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Thread: Culling by Lab Breeders/Owners

  1. #1
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    Default Culling by Lab Breeders/Owners

    Fairly new to the lab world (6 year owner) and was curious to learn if most lab breeders/owners practice culling, that is, not breeding those dogs with undesirable traits. From my readings, it appears that the Brits do and the Americans try to breed the week traits out. Am I somewhat correct? My passed experience has been as a horseback fieldtrialer and breeder of one litter a year. Thanks and look forward to your responses.

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    I would like to believe no one practices culling. I know it's just a fantasy but I would like to believe there is a place for every pup.
    Gentle in what you do. Firm in how you do it.

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    By culling do you mean putting puppies down at birth, which was what happened at one time with yellows, or do you mean selective breeding. Choosing not to breed a female or male with undesirables traits, too much white, over or under bites, carrier of a gene for EIC or CNM etc. I chose not to breed my last female because she carriers EIC but I would never have bred a litter and culled puppies that were carriers. I do know someone who says he would cull chocolate puppies from his litters (not sure his wife would let him).

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    He explained that he meant breeders not breeding dogs with undesirable traits. I hope breeders are doing that.

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    Right. Traditionally the word "culling" meant putting puppies down at birth if they were deemed defective. Brutal. Who kills puppies??? Who does that??? But for those breeders who are performance oriented (FT, HT, hunting) the emphasis is absolutely to breed away from the carriers of diseases for which there is a genetic test.

    Breeding titled dogs (who are cleared of being carriers) to titled dogs (also non-carriers) really gives a good breeder an idea of performance that could be anticipated in the off-spring. On this forum, doubtless you'll see discussions of lines that produce exceptional marking dogs. Those should be bred. Other threads will discuss things like drive and "an off switch" (i.e., can my family live with this dog...).

    More power to them. It takes a lot of know-how to produce consistently highly successful litters.

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    If you will look at my earlier post, I said, not breeding dogs with undesirable traits, never would consider putting them down. I hope this clears this up from my end.

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    Senior Member Colonel Blimp's Avatar
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    Flatwalk,

    I would guess that it's as mixed a picture in the US as it is here; if there is money to be made from a potential breeding, even if the progeny are likely to be less than stellar, that breeding will go ahead.

    In very broad brush terms I'd say that the most conscientious breeders are those amateurs who might produce one or two litters a year and aren't in it for the money. I think that applies to all the sporting breeds, not just retrievers. If you know who these guys and girls are you can source some fine dogs.

    Eug
    Thank you, very kind, Mine's a pint.

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    Senior Member Rainmaker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1tulip View Post
    Right. Traditionally the word "culling" meant putting puppies down at birth if they were deemed defective. Brutal. Who kills puppies??? Who does that??? But for those breeders who are performance oriented (FT, HT, hunting) the emphasis is absolutely to breed away from the carriers of diseases for which there is a genetic test.

    Breeding titled dogs (who are cleared of being carriers) to titled dogs (also non-carriers) really gives a good breeder an idea of performance that could be anticipated in the off-spring. On this forum, doubtless you'll see discussions of lines that produce exceptional marking dogs. Those should be bred. Other threads will discuss things like drive and "an off switch" (i.e., can my family live with this dog...).

    More power to them. It takes a lot of know-how to produce consistently highly successful litters.
    Once again, there is nothing wrong with breeding carriers, there are plenty of fine dogs, titled dogs, National caliber type dogs, who are carriers, of something. We have some genetic tests we can use to breed around producing affecteds of EIC, CNM and PRA. That is the very simple part. Not producing bad hips, elbows, eyes is not so black and white. Those are just the physical. Add in the X factor needed for whatever particular venue one is pursuing and it gets ever more complex, and less predictable. For some, the emphasis is on a particular look, for others, getting a National Field Champion caliber dog trumps anything else.

    "Culling" is as individual as the breeder. Some will breed to add desirable or remove/improve upon less desirable, some will remove a dog from their breeding program completely. Mostly the "reputable" ones will remove the dogs that don't pass health clearances, but sometimes, not even that, if there is something about that dog that warrants breeding regardless of failed hips or whatnot. It's just too big and generic of a question to have any straight, simple answer.
    Kim Pfister, Rainmaker Labs

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    Quote Originally Posted by Flatwalk09 View Post
    If you will look at my earlier post, I said, not breeding dogs with undesirable traits, never would consider putting them down. I hope this clears this up from my end.
    I think you made that very clear in your original post, sometimes people respond without having read the original post.

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    Senior Member Mary Lynn Metras's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by EdA View Post
    I think you made that very clear in your original post, sometimes people respond without having read the original post.
    NO! does that really happen!
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