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Thread: Cavalier King Charles Spaniels ??

  1. #11
    Senior Member Jennifer Henion's Avatar
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    I stick with my original statement. Most people know what a "responsible breeder" means.

  2. #12
    Senior Member Dave Flint's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jennifer Henion View Post
    I stick with my original statement. Most people know what a "responsible breeder" means.

    Jennifer, I disagree with that assumption. The OP stated that he was hoping to avoid (as much as possible) putting his wife through exactly the heart break that this particular breed is noted for. I cannot understand why someone would overlook the opportunity to rescue a dog if its primary purpose is to serve as a loving pet.

    From the link below:

    More than 80 percent of the dogs have heart defects, and half the dogs die from these heart problems.

    And yet, in a world in which dogs are routinely killed for no other reason than they are no longer puppies, we still have people flocking to Cavalier King Charles Spaniels despite the fact that it is nearly impossible to get a truly health dog.


    Added to the jaw-dropping numbers for heart mitral valve disease, we also have the latest bit of staggering data about syringomyelia, a disorder of the brain and spinal cord which may cause severe head and neck pain and possible paralysis.

    The American College of Veterinary Radiology is set to publish a new paper on The Morphology of the Caudal Fossa in Cavalier King Charles Spaniels.

    Not exactly a page-turner of a title, is it?

    That said, here's what the study shows: Out of 64 dogs examined, 59 had morphologic abnormalities of the craniocervical junction, 27 dogs had syringohydromyelia, and 15 presented with clinical signs of syringomyelia.


    http://terriermandotcom.blogspot.com...-are-mess.html
    "The bird hunter watches only the dog, and always knows where the dog is, whether or not visible at the moment. The dog’ nose is the bird hunters eye. Many hunters who carry a shotgun in season have never learned to watch the dog, or interpret his reaction to scent."
    Aldo Leopold, Round River

  3. #13
    Senior Member Sharon Potter's Avatar
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    I used to manage a horse farm for a lady who raises and shows Cavaliers, so I got to see a lot of them. They are sweet dogs and make nice lap dogs if you're just wanting a dog to pet and sit by you on the sofa. And they do come with a bucketload of health issues. Plus, for what they are, the price is very high from a reputable breeder (which she is).
    Sharon Potter

    www.redbranchkennels.net

    Chesapeake Bay Retrievers...too many to list.

    Team Huntsmith

  4. #14
    Member Lauren Koch's Avatar
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    I had a friend buy one from a backyard breeder around here. The pups had no health clearances and were not able to be registered so in turn they were "cheaper" than most Cavalier pups. Cheap being $600. Anyway, when the pup was about 5 months old it got Syringomyelia. She could not shut it's mouth. She could not chew correctly, drink, and she drooled constantly. For 4 months my friend had to use a dropper to give it water and spoon feed her mash so she lived. Her mouth almost shuts now, it is not perfect and probably never will be, but she can eat and drink on her own. I guess the point of my story is, if you are going to get a Cavalier, don't go down the same road my friend did. Find a reputable breeder with tons of references from past puppy buyers.
    Lauren Koch
    Shedhorn Labradors
    Kalispell, MT 59901

    http://www.shedhornlabs.com

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    HRCH What Can Brown Do For You MH
    Shedhorn's Amazing Grace SH

  5. #15
    Senior Member Jennifer Henion's Avatar
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    Dave,

    I'm glad you posted the information. It is important info to know. And as an active member of my local Humane Society, I agree it's great if you can adopt an otherwise unwanted dog.

    However, my 75 yr Mom just went through a 2 year ordeal with adopting a small dog from her local HS. Long story, but the dog was of the super dominant, pig headed variety. Mom took it to dog daycare for extra exercise and socialization, took it for walks three times a day (she also has a fenced in yard with squirrels to chase). Plus, she drove in snow and ice to attend obedience classes with it every week for 6 weeks. Dog was still a jerk and would escape and chase bicyclists and bite guests on the leg. She then hired a trainer to come to her house at a $100 a pop. Dog still a jerk. A female, too.
    My Mom's no dummy and was doing a good job plus plus plus. She wanted to do good by adopting/rescuing a small dog from death row. She wasn't the dog whisperer, but she put in the effort for nearly 2 yrs. It escalated into the dog escaping the back yard during pee breaks and terrorizing the neighbors and passers by.

    She ended up calling the shelter and waiting til a foster home could be found to take the dog. This dog was a companion she adopted 1 year after my Dad died. It was brutal!

    Now we're looking for something a little more predictable and reliable. Unfortunately, I live several states away and couldn't help her with the first situation.

    Not that all adoption are like this, but frankly, bad things can happen with any dog you buy or adopt. It's a crap shoot.

  6. #16
    Senior Member archer66's Avatar
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    I know two King Charles Cavalier dogs....one has heart problems and is prone to siezures and the other is deaf as a stone. Both walk like something is wrong with their necks and both are sweet and friendly as can be. Great lap dogs also...in fact they're such good lap dogs as soon as you sit down there they are ready to lay down and take a nap.

  7. #17
    Senior Member crackerd's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sharon Potter View Post
    (A) lady who raises and shows Cavaliers, so I got to see a lot of them. They are sweet dogs and make nice lap dogs if you're just wanting a dog to pet and sit by you on the sofa. And they do come with a bucketload of health issues. Plus, for what they are, the price is very high from a reputable breeder (which she is).
    Sharon, did/does she offer health guarantees? That usually adds another $1,000-$1,500 to the puppy price.

    Once again, Dave Flint's given the skinny (and the smushed) on a spaniel breed "ransacked and ravaged" by the American show fancy, but the overzealous purveyors of omniscience - sorry, former newspaper reporters - are telling him how wrong he is.

    The Cavvies that are worth having apropos their longstanding litany of health issues - at least by those I know who've insisted on getting them - come from the UK (and particularly Ireland), where the kennel clubs have gotten a little more health-conscious on behalf of the spaniel breeds. www.thecavalierclub.co.uk/ But it's still a gamble I wouldn't take.

    MG

  8. #18
    Senior Member EdA's Avatar
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    Before buying become acquainted with your local veterinary cardiologist, orthopedic surgeon, neurologist, and radiologist and read the exclusions on your pet health insurance policy. There is much to like about the breed except for all the potential health problems.

  9. #19
    Senior Member Sharon Potter's Avatar
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    The Cavalier club in the USA is quite health conscious as well. However, the rapidly increasing popularity of the breed in addition to its rather strange re-birth from extinction have contributed to a boatload of problems. And the show ring, as usual, compounds the problem. Add to that the puppy mills and it's no surprise the breed has so many issues.

    I don't know what health guarantee she offers, but I do know she has heart clearances done regularly and is heavily involved on both the regional and national level. I will be happy to PM her contact info to serious puppy buyers.
    Last edited by Sharon Potter; 03-07-2013 at 06:45 AM.
    Sharon Potter

    www.redbranchkennels.net

    Chesapeake Bay Retrievers...too many to list.

    Team Huntsmith

  10. #20

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    Please don't be discouraged by all the negative coments about this breed, yes they do have their share of problems however the breeders who care are doing right by the breed. I have my third Cavalier now and can't imagine myself being without one. I can tell you that my Cavaliers have won over many a macho man...... There are breeders in my state of Michigan that have dogs living well into their teens. If you want a puppy do your homework, go visit the breeders, see their dogs, ask about the health issues longevity etc. There are times when puppies are kept as show prospects that don't work out, or older animals are placed when they can be the "only Cavalier". They are wonderful little dogs that fit really well with retrievers - please don't rule them out.

    Kim & Chloe (aka "The Princess")


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