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Thread: Pointing labs!!

  1. #1
    Junior Member misarskennels's Avatar
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    Default Pointing labs!!

    Am I crazy or is there an over abundant amount of "pointing labs" on the RTF?

  2. #2
    Senior Member Kevin Eskam's Avatar
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    Your crazy!!
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  3. #3
    Senior Member yellow machine's Avatar
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    your crazy
    A cold nose feels good on a hot day.....
    Majestic Oaks Liberty Belle JH

  4. #4
    Senior Member hotel4dogs's Avatar
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    Can someone help me out here?
    What is the reason for a pointing lab?
    Aren't upland retrievers supposed to flush game, not point at it?
    I expect the boy to flush the bird then sit on his fuzzybutt until sent to retrieve the bird. He will point small game (rabbits, mice) around my yard, but never a bird in the field. He flushes those.
    Sorry to sound dumb, just don't get it. Probably just lack of knowledge and/or experience on my part.

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  5. #5
    Senior Member yellow machine's Avatar
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    Barb my same thoughts.
    A cold nose feels good on a hot day.....
    Majestic Oaks Liberty Belle JH

  6. #6
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    I think we all have our thoughts and it relates to what we do with our dogs. I don't have pointing labs, mine flush, but I have hunted with a number of older gentlemen (70's) that have great pointers allowing them to have a great duck dog and then an extremely hard charging upland dog that will wait for them to catch up and make a shot. As a wild bird hunter too, I can't say that having a dog that sits on the flush is too beneficial as those big roosters routinely hit the ground with legs and will be a mile away when you send your dog. I understand sit to flush for a guide dog on a game farm or for something to put as a requirement for a test but in my eyes (just my personal opinion for my needs) it isn't a trait for a gun dog. Again we all have our own opinions and needs and I would love a good pointing lab that can

  7. #7
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    Sorry, closed windo to soon, a pointing lab that can be competitive in the rest of the games that help is pass time until hunting season.

  8. #8

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    My lab points naturally. Hunted him with a few a few master hunter titled dogs over the years and it was quite embarrasing for the owners of the titled dogs. He can out hunt any dog alive in the uplands. He can't run a 400 yd blind but he can trail a crippled rooster for a mile.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sadie & Ruby View Post
    I think we all have our thoughts and it relates to what we do with our dogs. I don't have pointing labs, mine flush, but I have hunted with a number of older gentlemen (70's) that have great pointers allowing them to have a great duck dog and then an extremely hard charging upland dog that will wait for them to catch up and make a shot. As a wild bird hunter too, I can't say that having a dog that sits on the flush is too beneficial as those big roosters routinely hit the ground with legs and will be a mile away when you send your dog. I understand sit to flush for a guide dog on a game farm or for something to put as a requirement for a test but in my eyes (just my personal opinion for my needs) it isn't a trait for a gun dog. Again we all have our own opinions and needs and I would love a good pointing lab that can
    I agree. I want my dog on top of a rooster the second it hits the ground.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Dave Flint's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hotel4dogs View Post
    Can someone help me out here?
    What is the reason for a pointing lab?
    Aren't upland retrievers supposed to flush game, not point at it?
    I expect the boy to flush the bird then sit on his fuzzybutt until sent to retrieve the bird. He will point small game (rabbits, mice) around my yard, but never a bird in the field. He flushes those.
    Sorry to sound dumb, just don't get it. Probably just lack of knowledge and/or experience on my part.
    Pointing labs are the ideal dog for a shooting preserve. They work close & are easier to control than true pointing breeds and the pen raised birds tend to hold much better than wild birds do. The typical customer of these facilities isn’t likely to be a very sophisticated connoisseur of fine dog work so he or she is easily impressed that the dog “tells” them when he’s found a bird. The novice shooter is also more likely to make the shot when they have the chance to get closer & prepare for it. When the bird is hit, the dog (being a Lab) is also more likely to make the retrieve which results in a happy customer.

    For wild pheasant hunting however, a hard driving flushing dog will present more birds for the gun.
    "The bird hunter watches only the dog, and always knows where the dog is, whether or not visible at the moment. The dog’ nose is the bird hunters eye. Many hunters who carry a shotgun in season have never learned to watch the dog, or interpret his reaction to scent."
    Aldo Leopold, Round River

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