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Thread: Pointing labs!!

  1. #11
    Senior Member Richard McCullough's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by misarskennels View Post
    Am I crazy or is there an over abundant amount of "pointing labs" on the RTF?
    Your Crazy
    The Style, flush or point is totally up to what the owner wants. I hunted for years over a pair of flushing labs and loved it. Then I got my Pointing Lab in 2007. I do not think I will get any other type Lab again.
    This fall they spent numerous days duck hunting in the morning only to come out of the marsh right into an upland hunt
    4XGMPR HRCH Lankas Labs Brandys Maximillion MH "Max"

    GMPR HR Rick's Rooster Smasher of DRL SH "Eli"

    APR Bearpoint's They Call Me The Breeze SH "Breeze"

    The New Club; Piedmont Pointing Labrador Club

  2. #12
    Senior Member jd6400's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Flint View Post
    Pointing labs are the ideal dog for a shooting preserve. They work close & are easier to control than true pointing breeds and the pen raised birds tend to hold much better than wild birds do. The typical customer of these facilities isn’t likely to be a very sophisticated connoisseur of fine dog work so he or she is easily impressed that the dog “tells” them when he’s found a bird. The novice shooter is also more likely to make the shot when they have the chance to get closer & prepare for it. When the bird is hit, the dog (being a Lab) is also more likely to make the retrieve which results in a happy customer.

    For wild pheasant hunting however, a hard driving flushing dog will present more birds for the gun.
    Man Dave after 30 yrs in the hunting preserve industry I guess I got it all wrong. Jim

  3. #13
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    My current dog is a flusher, but after having the opportunity to hunt with a pointing lab last fall. I have no doubt that my next lab will come from pointing lines! As of now, I'm completely sold it. Narrowed the breeders down to a couple. Just waiting for the OK from the wife!

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Flint View Post
    Pointing labs are the ideal dog for a shooting preserve. They work close & are easier to control than true pointing breeds and the pen raised birds tend to hold much better than wild birds do. The typical customer of these facilities isn’t likely to be a very sophisticated connoisseur of fine dog work so he or she is easily impressed that the dog “tells” them when he’s found a bird. The novice shooter is also more likely to make the shot when they have the chance to get closer & prepare for it. When the bird is hit, the dog (being a Lab) is also more likely to make the retrieve which results in a happy customer.

    For wild pheasant hunting however, a hard driving flushing dog will present more birds for the gun.
    Great observation from a Texas native. I live in western Kansas and I find your post to be totally false.

  5. #15
    Senior Member Dave Flint's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sadie & Ruby View Post
    As a wild bird hunter too, I can't say that having a dog that sits on the flush is too beneficial as those big roosters routinely hit the ground with legs and will be a mile away when you send your dog. I understand sit to flush for a guide dog on a game farm or for something to put as a requirement for a test but in my eyes (just my personal opinion for my needs) it isn't a trait for a gun dog.


    There are a lot of reasons for a steady upland dog.
    • It’s safer.
    • It doesn’t distract the shooter.
    • It doesn’t block the shot on a low flying bird.
    • It doesn’t flush other birds while chasing a hen.
    • It doesn’t run across the road after a missed bird or hen.
    • It marks the fall better.
    • It saves energy (on misses or fly aways).
    • It’s a more “refined” performance.
    • It doesn’t steal the other dogs retrieves.

    There is typically only one reason given for not having a steady upland dog and that really is inconsequential for one reason; you can send the dog early if you cripple the bird.
    "The bird hunter watches only the dog, and always knows where the dog is, whether or not visible at the moment. The dog’ nose is the bird hunters eye. Many hunters who carry a shotgun in season have never learned to watch the dog, or interpret his reaction to scent."
    Aldo Leopold, Round River

  6. #16
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    A lot of people who would like to have a pointing dog are intimidated by range and think the dog will run off. It won't, but this is an ever-present fear for many novices. Ergo, the PL.

  7. #17
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    In all reality I think that the lab is the most versatile dog out there, everyone here has great points of what works for their needs and the beautiful thing is that we can all find a breeding out there that can give us what we all want and desire.

  8. #18
    Senior Member Bubba's Avatar
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    Pointing Labs is easy. Yas just take an afternoon and teach um to stand real still when they smell birds.

    There ain't no such thing as a Pointing dog in an asparagus field regards

    Bubba
    There are three classes of people: those who see...those who see when shown...and those who do not see. - Leonardo da Vinci

  9. #19
    Senior Member Dave Flint's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by westksbowhunter View Post
    Great observation from a Texas native. I live in western Kansas and I find your post to be totally false.
    Which part?
    "The bird hunter watches only the dog, and always knows where the dog is, whether or not visible at the moment. The dog’ nose is the bird hunters eye. Many hunters who carry a shotgun in season have never learned to watch the dog, or interpret his reaction to scent."
    Aldo Leopold, Round River

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Flint View Post
    There are a lot of reasons for a steady upland dog.
    • It’s safer. Only if hunting with unsafe shooters, in which we should never do
    • It doesn’t distract the shooter. That's interesting
    • It doesn’t block the shot on a low flying bird. True, but not often
    • It doesn’t flush other birds while chasing a hen. But it going to flush other birds while ranging
    • It doesn’t run across the road after a missed bird or hen. In 35 years of upland this is a non issue
    • It marks the fall better. False
    • It saves energy (on misses or fly aways). Four leaps a flush, thats a lot of energy wasted
    • It’s a more “refined” performance. May impress a novice
    • It doesn’t steal the other dogs retrieves. Stop whistle
    I'm sorry I found your list a little amusing and half of it seems like you were trying to think up anything just to add to your list.
    Last edited by mngundog; 03-10-2013 at 07:49 PM.

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