The RetrieverTraining.Net Forums The Retriever Academy
Total Retriever Training with Mike Lardy
Hawkeye Media Gunners Up Tritronics Outdoor Media
Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 40

Thread: So how many of you guys do formal obedience, Show and feel that it is important?

  1. #11
    Senior Member chesaka's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Chugiak, Alaska
    Posts
    292

    Default

    I started out in the show ring and to date have achieved CH titles on five Chesapeakes, mostly handling the dogs in the show ring myself. Three of those dogs were of my breeding. I now strive to have titles on both ends of the dog, a CH on the front and a nice field title on the back.

  2. #12
    Senior Member PalouseDogs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Pullman, WA
    Posts
    275

    Default

    Obedience is my first love. My golden girl drug me into hunt tests because she's so crazy about swimming and retrieving. I think obedience at the highest level is very important for breeds in which intelligence and trainability are supposed to be important traits. OB looks deceptively easy from ringside, but getting a UD on a dog is a big challenge. I'll be showing my standard poodle (who is NOT the brightest bulb in the poodle pack!) in Utility for the first time in 5 weeks and my golden girl in Open.

    I've done agility and put a couple titles on a prior poodle, but the current poodle doesn't jump well enough and two dog activities (OB and hunt tests) are all I can handle with a full-time job.
    Kelly Cassidy (person)

    HR Maple Cassidy CDX JH RE (golden retriever)
    Alder Cassidy CDX RE (standard poodle chipmunk chaser)
    plus whacked-out weird Burka (elderly mix-breed rescue girl)

  3. #13
    Senior Member hotel4dogs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    SW of Chicago, IL
    Posts
    2,325

    Default

    Obedience is the foundation for everything. Doing it formally, and showing in it, may help keep you motivated to hold your standards very high, which carries over to field.

    Barb Gibson
    with
    CH Rosewood Little Giant UDX VER RA SH MXP MJP OFP VCX WCX CCA CGC FFX-OG
    also UCH HR UUD UJJ URO1 UHIT
    (golden retriever) born 3-10-07
    a.k.a. "Tito", "The Tito Monster"
    www.GoTeamTito.com

  4. #14
    Senior Member Pam Spears's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Western Colorado
    Posts
    670

    Default

    How do those of you who do field work along with obedience at the higher levels keep from mixing up commands? Heel for example: in the field, you don't expect a dog to do a heads-up heel maintaining eye contact, but in obedience that's what you want. Do you rely on the dogs to know the difference based on situation, or do you use different commands? My dogs both have RNs, but I've been holding off on showing in Novice Obedience because of (what I perceive to be) the differences. Both are capable of doing novice work, but it seems like the higher you go, the more complicated it gets.

    What about send-outs? Do you use back? or something else? I have purposely taught the dogs to release their ducks and dummies on the command "give" so that the word "out" will be available for obedience later, but maybe I'm just overthinking it.... LOL.
    Pam
    Roughwater Stacked & Packed, "Babe," MH, CD, RN, CGC, WDQ

  5. #15
    Senior Member gdgnyc's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    2,296

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Pam Spears View Post
    How do those of you who do field work along with obedience at the higher levels keep from mixing up commands? Heel for example: in the field, you don't expect a dog to do a heads-up heel maintaining eye contact, but in obedience that's what you want. Do you rely on the dogs to know the difference based on situation, or do you use different commands? My dogs both have RNs, but I've been holding off on showing in Novice Obedience because of (what I perceive to be) the differences. Both are capable of doing novice work, but it seems like the higher you go, the more complicated it gets.

    What about send-outs? Do you use back? or something else? I have purposely taught the dogs to release their ducks and dummies on the command "give" so that the word "out" will be available for obedience later, but maybe I'm just overthinking it.... LOL.
    I use a different heel command in the field.
    "I love the rod and gun and where they take me."

    "Do not judge a man until you have walked two moons in his moccasins."

  6. #16
    Senior Member PalouseDogs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Pullman, WA
    Posts
    275

    Default

    I use a different command and a different body position. For formal heeling, I hold my hand across my stomach and use "With me". Command doesn't matter as long as it sounds different than your field heel command and you will find that dogs quickly learn to respond not just to the command but the whole context. I have a big yard, so I usually do hunt training in one part and OB in another. Also, remember to not apply the same standards to a field heel as an OB heel. Since the dog is not looking at me in a field heel, I give verbal warning that I am turning right or left.

    I've found that there is much more confusion when you get to the higher levels of OB. The signal exercise and the directed jumping are especially confusing. Yesterday, I started training by working handling with the golden. Then I put her in the house and worked Utility with the poodle. Then I brought the golden out again for OB. She's gotten pretty good about distinguishing Utility exercises from Hunt work, but the last couple of weeks, I've been mostly concentrating on Open exercises and we haven't done much Utility. I sent her on a Go-Out, gave the Bar Jump command with a left arm out signal...and she went straight left (her right) across the back of the ring, out the corner of the ring, and went racing around looking for a bird. For the jump signals, I try to keep my elbow close to my body so it looks less like an Over signal, but, clearly, the difference is sometimes too subtle for her.

    You just have to be patient and work through the confusion without making it worse by letting yourself get mad or frustrated.
    Kelly Cassidy (person)

    HR Maple Cassidy CDX JH RE (golden retriever)
    Alder Cassidy CDX RE (standard poodle chipmunk chaser)
    plus whacked-out weird Burka (elderly mix-breed rescue girl)

  7. #17
    Senior Member suepuff's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    South Central Virginia
    Posts
    658

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by hotel4dogs View Post
    Obedience is the foundation for everything. Doing it formally, and showing in it, may help keep you motivated to hold your standards very high, which carries over to field.
    Ditto. I slacked up on one dog figuring I didn't need as precise heeling. I regret it. You have more control and steadiness with better heeling. Won't do without that strong obedience competition heeling foundation again.

    As to knowing the difference between heads up and heeling for bird work. One word....BIRDS. Once they figure out the bird thing I think it becomes a non-issue. And on the signals, I used to use straight up for down, but obviously now that is back. For down, I use a hand push. So my right hand is at waist level and I push forward. It is important to think about what colors you are wearing when you teach this and show. Wear a dark color so your hand stands out. Works fine! I think in an emergency situation the straight up down is best, but you have to compromise...

    As far as give or out. I use the same word for it all. If I want it, regardless of what it is, it is release. I've been a real slacker on go outs lately since I've been so tied up with field work, but it's the same think for me. Back is Back. Run forward until I tell you to stop.

    Hope that helps.

    Sue Puff
    Last edited by suepuff; 03-12-2013 at 11:33 AM. Reason: added something.
    Sue Puffenbarger
    Wirtz, VA
    www.boynelabradors.com

  8. #18
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Fall City, WA
    Posts
    4,622

    Default

    GCh on my bitch. I was forced to go to handling classes at night to coerce my handler(shut it Julie! ) into showing my dog. When a dog has been taught to sit at heal whenever you stop, re-teaching them to stand in front of you is nearly impossible.

    Talking with John Gunn about line manners last trial he credited his wife for all the work she does with his dogs.

  9. #19
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    northeast Pennsylvania
    Posts
    135

    Default

    In the beginning, I would have never believed that I would be able to do three different venues at the same time. I currently participate in obedience, agility, and hunt tests - but the dogs can learn to differentiate, and it does work. What I have found is that by doing all three, it has made me a better handler.

    Obedience at the highest level is very difficult and requires a bond between you and your dog that is far different that the field or agility. Let's face it....if a dog was left to do what he wanted to do, he might hunt ducks, perhaps jump over "obsticles" in the woods, but I don't think you would find many dogs doing attention heeling for fun. I like having to find a way to work with my dog to bring out that attention and it requires that I spend quality time each day trying to perfect things like perfect front and finish positions, as well as the ultimate heel position.

    There are other issues too....try teaching utility articles to a dog that has been through FTP. In the beginning it is a challenge, until they figure out the game. I am not sure what everyone else uses, but for articles I use "find it" so that I don't ever confuse it with a go and grab command. As already described some of the dogs in utility confuse the jump for over piles. I find that hand position is critical here. All my casting signals start from mid body, my jump signal starts from my side. I am currently actually doing pile work in my utility set up and my dog has learned to differentiate between over casts and jump signals.

    All of my other commands are pretty simple - the only other one that changes for hunt test work is "heel". For me, heads up, pay attention to me is heel. When I go to the hunt test line I do not have heads up attention, and nor would I expect it. I do expect that the dog stays with me, but there are birds in those fields....how could I even think my dog could heel with its head up eyes glued to mine when she thinks there is a bird. So my field word is "here", which still allows for good position, but relaxes the standard on the head position.

    I was very happy to see that so many people actually participate in obedience. I was just at a show this weekend and there was a handler there that I know does at least master level hunt tests with her dog if not field trials. While her dog wasn't perfect by ring standards, he was motivated, happy, lightning fast, and one awesome retriever. What a joy to watch - and it is nice to see the smiles on the judges' faces for the extreme effort.

    Happy Training!


    Where there is a will, there is a way.

  10. #20
    Senior Member swampcollielover's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    MO
    Posts
    1,535

    Default Labs are not always the best

    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Paye View Post
    I dont do any shows, But I do go to puppy class and go through novice ob and most of the time the labradors shine far above the rest of the class. This is all before six months old and before field training starts.
    I agree with Rob, as we too take our young dogs through a novice ob class with a qualified trainer. But, although the Labs we see in the class do well, the do not shine above the Golden Retrievers in the classes...at least those we have attended....

    But we all can agree that RETRIEVERS shine above the rest!...

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •