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Thread: Rowdy (by Pirate) Odd Quirk

  1. #1
    Senior Member Wayne Nutt's Avatar
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    Default Rowdy (by Pirate) Odd Quirk

    I should say one of Rowdy's odd quirks. I cue my dogs on "mark" prior to launching birds when we arrive at the mat and he has had time to look around. All my previous dogs when I cue mark will perk up their ears. Not Rowdy. When he gets to the mat his ears are already up. When I cue "mark", he tilts his head slightly to the left and down for a brief sec.
    I guess this is his way of acknowlegding the cue. Anyone else noticed anything like this?
    Wayne Nutt
    Go Nutts with dog training

    HRCH Patton's Parker Co. Shadow "Shadow"
    HRCH Clineline Hijacker "Jack"
    HRCH Marks a Lot Midnight Hudson, SH "Hudson"-retired
    Castile Creek's Rawhide, SH "Rowdy"

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    Senior Member Breck's Avatar
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    Not him acknowledging your cue but when he spots gun and is thinking about what's to come. A dog that does that can only help you know when he's "got it dad".
    "Darla" AFC Candlewoods Lil Smokin Tequila (2002-2013)(fondly remembered)
    "Smoke" Smokin Auggies Menace, QAA (2003- )(retired nut case, ask Rando)
    "Simba" Humewood Simba (1999-2014)(my 1st dog)

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  3. #3
    Senior Member Wayne Nutt's Avatar
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    Thanks Breck.
    Wayne Nutt
    Go Nutts with dog training

    HRCH Patton's Parker Co. Shadow "Shadow"
    HRCH Clineline Hijacker "Jack"
    HRCH Marks a Lot Midnight Hudson, SH "Hudson"-retired
    Castile Creek's Rawhide, SH "Rowdy"

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    Senior Member Brad B's Avatar
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    I have similar behavior in a dog right now but he's not a pirate dog. I think it's kind of fun to watch. Sometimes I'll repeat "mark" and he cranks his head even further.

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    Senior Member huntinman's Avatar
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    Wayne, do you have a Rowdy and a Hank by a sire other than Pirate? Just curious... thanks
    Bill Davis

  6. #6
    Senior Member Wayne Nutt's Avatar
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    Bill, The answer is no. Rowdy is by Pirate and he is my dog. Hank (by Pirate) is my son's dog. My other active dog is Shadow (by Patton). Hudson is 12 and he just hangs out.
    Wayne Nutt
    Go Nutts with dog training

    HRCH Patton's Parker Co. Shadow "Shadow"
    HRCH Clineline Hijacker "Jack"
    HRCH Marks a Lot Midnight Hudson, SH "Hudson"-retired
    Castile Creek's Rawhide, SH "Rowdy"

  7. #7
    Senior Member Evan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wayne Nutt View Post
    I guess this is his way of acknowlegding the cue. Anyone else noticed anything like this?
    Wayne,

    I have a couple thoughts on Rowdy's behavior in this instance. I don't think what he's doing is a quirk. It's part of his own style of behavior, and each dog has its own. Since dogs are situational learners, we must understand that they respond to all stimuli during training as they are guided to respond by us in how we cause them to connect commands with uniform acts, and in how we consistently set up environmental elements in fieldwork. That's largely why behaviorist theory applies so well to dog training. I'm really glad you brought this up because it's an area many trainers presume to understand, but may not; at least completely.

    Cues are an interesting topic. I especially like your example for discussion of cues, and how they work best. Whether we mean to or not, we guide our dog's expectations in response to verbal cues. I say that because even when we meant to teach our dogs a cue like "Mark", the way we do it may produce a slightly different expectation than we intended. Let's look at a couple examples.

    A dog being groomed for field trial competition will tend to be taught that the "Mark" cue not only means something is about to fall (and he should watch for it and prepare to mark), but also that the direction he is been positioned to look (the standing gun) is where he should fix his gaze, as that will be the first bird down. That becomes the trial dog's consistent expectation.

    In contrast to that, a hunting dog, and therefore a dog that also is being prepped for hunt tests, will come to have a somewhat different expectation. As usual, "Mark" means something is about to fall, but he won't be fixed on a physical gun station because, when hunting, you are the gun station; the source of the shot. The fall may come from anywhere...fall anywhere, and in any direction. That means the dog must be alert to those probabilities, rather than being pointed toward a white object or person as the source of the mark.

    Here's where I believe this connects to what Rowdy is doing. He appears to be in prep for hunt tests, so the latter description of the "Mark" cue responses is what I would expect. Different dogs show their responses according to:

    1. Their own style of work
    2. How you've most consistently trained and applied your "Mark" cue
    3. Sometimes according to how often a trainer uses live flyers in daily training

    What I think you're seeing is Rowdy's expectations demonstrated by his head-turning physical response. He's a good retriever, and comes to the line expecting something fun to happen 'out there', and so he tends to arrive with his ears up already. The head-turning is a form of animation that is a component of his individual style. Just my take on it. If you began to run a predominant percentage of field trial set ups over the next few weeks, you might expect to see him change in that in some way. I see no reason to do it. I'm only mentioning it to illustrate how a dog's style can be altered sometimes by how we're doing things, even when we may be oblivious to it.

    Evan
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    Very interesteing topic. I have a 2.5 yr old female and her whole body language changes when I cue "dead". She loves running blinds. I have had several dogs that didn't and it showed. They would almost sulk like they were saying "oh crap he's gonna make me do what he wants me to do" not her,she looks like she's saying "ok boss lets go get it"
    Last edited by labman63; 03-21-2013 at 10:32 AM.

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