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View Poll Results: Should a FT Pro own a dog on his truck?

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  • Yes

    115 54.25%
  • NO

    97 45.75%
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Thread: Should a FT pro OWN a dog on his truck?

  1. #81
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    First I want to know about Shayne kissing his cousin.

    I think the real problem with a pro owning his own dog is not at the
    trial but what he does during the week. The pro's derby dog
    runs the bank so on Monday all the dogs on the truck do
    cheating singles. Next week the dog creeps so all of the
    dogs on the truck have steadying drills. The following week
    his poor dog goes back to an old fall so Monday everydog
    on the truck is doing over/under marks hoping to get a correction.
    What is happening is that all of the dogs are being trained
    based upon what the pro's dog needs not what the individual dog
    needs.

    An old time field trialer told me that he didn't mind his pro training on
    the things the pro's favorite dog needed as long as long as the favorite dog was his.

    Bull

  2. #82
    Senior Member Lisa Van Loo's Avatar
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    I think some of this discussion does Pros a disservice.

    Certainly, there are individuals who don't handle this sitaution well (see Vicki's example). But I think most Pros will set up training to benefit the majority of what the dogs on their truck need.

    When working a large number of dogs, it simply is not possible to set up a specific training situation for each individual dog. So most will set things up that the majority of dogs need work on, and then simplify, modify, change-up what needs changing for those that have slightly different needs.

    I've encountered identical situations in a training group of strictly amateurs. Someone will set up something with a gazillion concepts in it to "test" their dog, and the rest of us are left to struggle with making it work for our dogs.

    Lisa
    "Go sell crazy someplace else. We're all stocked up here." - Jack Nicholson in As Good As It Gets

    http://www.chessieinfo.net

  3. #83
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    [quote="Lisa Van Loo"]
    When working a large number of dogs, it simply is not possible to set up a specific training situation for each individual dog. So most will set things up that the majority of dogs need work on, and then simplify, modify, change-up what needs changing for those that have slightly different needs.
    Dogs of a variety of skill levels and/or problems can be trained for with the same set of marks
    You can move up or back, move the line to the left or right ,throw it as singles ,throw a different, harder or easier sequence, retire or not, or retire in route etc ,etc, etc.
    In training a large number of dogs per day we set up an AA setup then break it down as need be according to whats happening with the particular dog.
    I am sure that this is commonplace with most Pros.

    Some people , dog Pros among them, are just not trustworthy.
    I would like to believe that this is the exception rather than the rule.
    john
    "i guess the old saying 'those of us that think we know everything annoy those of you that does' " --bobbyb 9/13/06

    "A Good Dog is a Good Dog"

  4. #84
    Senior Member achiro's Avatar
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    I can see the rub here but I have to ask, what if the pro in question has 4...5...6 or more client owned FC's on his/her truck. So what if he/she owns a dog or two(especially if they are for sale) if the other dogs are still winning. I would think it should only matter to the owners of the other dogs and if they don't care, why should you?!?!?! Seems like "taint, nobody's bidness but dey own"

  5. #85
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    Russ,

    Most Pro's (esp ones that have several FCs) trucks are full.

    If they take a space on their truck for one of their dogs - then they are denying a space for a client dog. Which client/dog is going to be told - "No room on this winter/summer trip."

    How would that make you feel as an owner who has been waiting for a year for the breeding and shelled out $4K for the pup? Esp. if it was a pup you were very excited about?
    "You can train your dog any way ya want. It ain't my dog. "

  6. #86
    Senior Member Anthony Heath's Avatar
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    Ultimately I think you have to like, trust, and respect your trainer as a person and a professional. More than likely they did/did not have dogs of their own when you decided to pick them as a trainer.

    You in the above being no particular individual. 8)
    He's got a little Mississippi Leg-Hound in him. Once he starts though, it's best to just let him finish.

  7. #87
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gerard Rozas
    How would that make you feel as an owner who has been waiting for a year for the breeding and shelled out $4K for the pup? Esp. if it was a pup you were very excited about?
    There is no such thing as "full" for a field trial pro running the Open. Gun dog trainers, hunt test trainers, and young dog trainers might get "full". But a field trial pro will always make room for another possible bullet in the last series.

    They just want the best possible dogs and they want to win... and they don't care which dog they do it with.

    Shayne

  8. #88
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shayne Mehringer
    There is no such thing as "full" for a field trial pro running the Open. Gun dog trainers, hunt test trainers, and young dog trainers might get "full". But a field trial pro will always make room for another possible bullet in the last series.

    They just want the best possible dogs and they want to win... and they don't care which dog they do it with.

    Shayne
    No truer words have been spoken on this subject.

  9. #89
    Senior Member Noah's Avatar
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    I understand the superstar puppy syndrome...but if a pro trainer were so inclined wouldn't it occur wether he owned the puppy/dog or one of his clients???
    "A dog doesn't care how much you know, until it knows how much you care."

    Rick W Jackson D.V.M.
    Gunpowder Creek Retrievers
    Dakota Decoy Field Staff

  10. #90
    Senior Member Joe S.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shayne Mehringer

    There is no such thing as "full" for a field trial pro running the Open.
    Not so fast there, Byteman...

    No such thing as full? Really? So...how many hours in a day are there in your world?

    IMHDAO (ubp, K2, Inc.) there comes a point in time where The Good Pro has to evaluate the requirements for training against those that need the training. Over the long term, it's VERY difficult to stick 30 training dogs in a 20 training dog day.

    The "always room for one more" syndrome can lead to a very slippery slope where the quality of product can suffer. The Good Pro can find themselves doing things, or not doing things, because of all the dogs requiring training. It's easy, in the moment, to think, "I'll get that next time...just let me finish up here with the others." The problem becomes when the "next time" thay have as many or MORE dogs that need work.

    I feel the client, or prospective client, needs to evaluate the number of dogs the Pro has and balance that against the time required to train a dog, the level of the dog being trained, the location of the grounds, the number of people helping the Pro and the daily requirments (professional and personal) in the life of a Pro.

    Gotten Up After A Fall Regards,

    Joe S.
    "Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anais Nin

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