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Thread: Question for upland hunters

  1. #1

    Default Question for upland hunters

    When pheasant hunting do you train your lab to be steady on shot and or flush? Or do you just let him get on it? Up until this point I haven't trained it and I can't complain. Only ever lost one bird since I've had the dog. He gets on any cripples really fast. I started teaching it today with bumper launcher and whistle and he picked it up real quick. With some live birds and a lot of training I could have him steady next season. Not sure if I should though. I got him for duck hunting and trained with smartworks but by accident he became an amazing flushing dog. We mostly pheasant hunt now. Any opinions?, pros and cons to teaching steady on shot/flush?

  2. #2
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    I want mine on the move for those roosters

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    Senior Member HNTFSH's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mjh345 View Post
    I want mine on the move for those roosters
    Ditto - just take care on those uphill lie flushes.
    We shoot dogs with a Canon

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    Senior Member copterdoc's Avatar
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    If I say the dog's name, the dog goes after the bird.
    If I blow the whistle, the dog has to sit.

    Early on, I want the sit response to flush/shot to be automatic.
    I can relax the standard later.
    I can't enforce and maintain a standard that I haven't set.

    It's easy enough to release the dog on it's name, before the bird is on the ground and running.
    It's not easy to stop or steady a dog that has been programmed to break on the flush, or the shot.
    Last edited by copterdoc; 03-24-2013 at 03:15 PM.

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    Senior Member HNTFSH's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by copterdoc View Post
    It's not easy to stop or steady a dog that has been programmed to break on the flush, or the shot.
    Sure it is my friend. Whoa or whistle sit. An experienced dog (at least on Pheasant) learns not to chase too far on a 'no shot' hen anyway. A crip bird who runs it's owns escape routes everyday can easily outpace a dog to safety, they do it with fox and coyote all the time. Every second counts.
    We shoot dogs with a Canon

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    Quote Originally Posted by HNTFSH View Post
    Sure it is my friend. Whoa or whistle sit. An experienced dog (at least on Pheasant) learns not to chase too far on a 'no shot' hen anyway. A crip bird who runs it's owns escape routes everyday can easily outpace a dog to safety, they do it with fox and coyote all the time. Every second counts.
    You are correct HTNFSH. My dogs upland hunt {WILD}Pheasants about 100 days a year and I have them take after the bird almost all of the time. When I do blow the whistle On the rare occasion where I want them steady, it is not a problem.
    My experience comes from actual upland hunting in the fields of S Dak though; whereas I suspect CopterDocs experience comes mainly from behind his computer screen

  7. #7
    Senior Member copterdoc's Avatar
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    I look at it kind of like swim by.

    Over accomplish the objective, ​FIRST and then you are "free" to relinquish control as needed.
    A balance can be easily struck, because you have already put the "weight" on the side of the scale that it's most difficult to add it.

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    Senior Member HNTFSH's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mjh345 View Post
    whereas I suspect CopterDocs experience comes mainly from behind his computer screen
    "Oh No you didn't!"

    Yes - wild birds and boy our few get pounded. Quite a few days we'll hit a field at the roadside ditch to roust the birds pushed there from an earlier group and at that point I do hunt whistle in mouth. But - most can't trust their dog that close to a road so we take advantage.

    If I ran tests only, hunted game farm birds, or guided strangers...I'd train sit to flush. it's safer. Hitting a sit whistle on the HRC upland test is as easy as the rest of the test looks.

    I mean really - mark how?

    We shoot dogs with a Canon

  9. #9
    Senior Member HNTFSH's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by copterdoc View Post
    A balance can be easily struck, because you have already put the "weight" on the side of the scale that it's most difficult to add it.
    On a hard working upland dog it has the same effect of slowing your dog on a mark. You can take it out but you can't put it back in.
    We shoot dogs with a Canon

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    Senior Member copterdoc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HNTFSH View Post
    On a hard working upland dog it has the same effect of slowing your dog on a mark. You can take it out but you can't put it back in.
    I've hunted with a lot more dogs that won't stop, than dogs that are reluctant to go.

    If your dog reliably stops, that's what matters. It doesn't matter to me how you achieved it.

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