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Thread: Question for upland hunters

  1. #51
    Senior Member HNTFSH's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by copterdoc View Post
    I do.

    But, it's nothing like it used to be. Not even close. Hardly even worth it.
    No it isn't but when it comes to DOG WORK - I'll take the one in Knotheads mouth there in the avatar over 2 dozen pen birds - any day.
    We shoot dogs with a Canon

  2. #52
    Senior Member copterdoc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HNTFSH View Post
    No it isn't but when it comes to DOG WORK - I'll take the one in Knotheads mouth there in the avatar over 2 dozen pen birds - any day.
    Not me.

    Around here, any "wild" bird you shoot, probably came from a pen. They're just more spread out. The notion of hunting wild pheasants, is delusional.

  3. #53
    Senior Member HNTFSH's Avatar
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    Yours must travel hundreds of miles from game farms and find refuge in habitat and be sourced up to flush the same year. Pretty incredible.
    We shoot dogs with a Canon

  4. #54
    Senior Member copterdoc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HNTFSH View Post
    Yours must travel hundreds of miles from game farms and find refuge in habitat and be sourced up to flush the same year. Pretty incredible.
    How long do you think that Ohio would continue to have pheasants in huntable numbers, if not for stocking efforts, and game farms?
    Honestly?

  5. #55
    Senior Member HNTFSH's Avatar
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    It's been on the rise for 10 years. It's about HABITAT not releases and game farms.
    We shoot dogs with a Canon

  6. #56
    Senior Member copterdoc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HNTFSH View Post
    It's been on the rise for 10 years. It's about HABITAT not releases.
    I didn't say that hunting is the culprit.

    But, if not for the preserves, they'd be gone.

  7. #57
    Senior Member HNTFSH's Avatar
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    You don't know anything about it do you?
    We shoot dogs with a Canon

  8. #58
    Senior Member Sharon Potter's Avatar
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    Upland is my specialty, both pointing dogs and retrievers. The most efficient way for my pheasant dogs to work is to be steady to the flush, and break on the shot. That avoids a dog being in the way of the shot, yet it can be on the bird when it hits the ground.
    Sharon Potter

    www.redbranchkennels.net

    Chesapeake Bay Retrievers...too many to list.

    Team Huntsmith

  9. #59
    Senior Member HNTFSH's Avatar
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    Copdoc - when the pheasant hunting was pretty good back in the 50's and 60's - do you think it was because of game farms? It was about HABITAT.

    It still is.

    Goin' to bed.
    We shoot dogs with a Canon

  10. #60
    Senior Member Dave Flint's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mjh345 View Post
    Thats one strategy, but you better have your track shoes on and be prepared for quite a workout. Additionally this strategy can lead to disturbing way more cover and scattering way more birds than its worth for me.
    This strategy is also not suitable for a driven hunt utilizing drivers, flankers & blockers
    Experience has taught me that it is far more efficient to have that dog running from the get go to get that bird captured ASAP. When a wing shot bird hits the ground they generally have a split second of confusion, which the breaking dog takes advantage of to get the bird.
    If you want to give a winged wild pheasant with two good legs under it a bit of a headstart, then you have vastly underestimated that bird IMHO
    That style of hunting holds no appeal to me whatsoever. Neither does the type of cover that HNTFSH showed in the earlier pic. If thatís what turns you on, I agree thereís no good reason to train your dog to be steady.

    I hunt these days solely for the dog work. I prefer to hunt either by myself or w/ on or 2 guys who appreciate the same things I do- watching a dog run according to the wind conditions, find birds w/ his nose from a long way off then driving in w/ a hard flush to present a sporting shot. Steadiness is a refinement that lets the dog mark the fall & I train year around on these skills so that if I do screw up & break a wing leaving the bird w/ his legs, I expect my dog to race to the AOF & pick up the trail to find the cripple. For me thatís all part of the enjoyment of a good dog & the ability to successfully trail a running bird separates the great ones from the rest.

    A long time ago, I realized that my shooting skill was the weak link in the team so I applied myself to getting better. I guess I don't understand training a dog to be exceptional at his job w/out doing the work to keep up your end of the bargain. One thing Iíve seen is that many hunters gear up w/ tight chokes & heavy loads suitable for shooting long birds that they donít have the skill to hit. Then they either destroy or blow the wing off of the birds that they do shoot at 20 yds. I watched a couple years ago as a guy clobbered just such a bird only to have his dog come up empty. We were nearing the truck so I got my Springer out & took him back to the feathers. He put his nose down & took off down the hill about 100 yds bringing back a very lively rooster w/ one wing completely missing.

    Pheasants are a large bird and relatively slow getting off the ground. Youíve got more time than you think to let it pick a direction & kill it cleanly. Then you wonít need to have a dog play center fielder ready to catch the bird before it runs off.
    "The bird hunter watches only the dog, and always knows where the dog is, whether or not visible at the moment. The dogí nose is the bird hunters eye. Many hunters who carry a shotgun in season have never learned to watch the dog, or interpret his reaction to scent."
    Aldo Leopold, Round River

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