The RetrieverTraining.Net Forums The Retriever Academy
Total Retriever Training with Mike Lardy
Hawkeye Media Gunners Up Tritronics Gun Dog Broker
Page 7 of 10 FirstFirst ... 56789 ... LastLast
Results 61 to 70 of 91

Thread: Question for upland hunters

  1. #61
    Senior Member HNTFSH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    1,195

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Sharon Potter View Post
    Upland is my specialty, both pointing dogs and retrievers. The most efficient way for my pheasant dogs to work is to be steady to the flush, and break on the shot. That avoids a dog being in the way of the shot, yet it can be on the bird when it hits the ground.
    Unless the first shot is a 'miss' and the second and third shot follows. But I'd do that before 'releasing' a dog.
    We shoot dogs with a Canon

  2. #62
    Senior Member copterdoc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    NW IL
    Posts
    2,299

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by HNTFSH View Post
    You don't know anything about it do you?
    I don't know why the numbers are down. But, I know that they are.

    Maybe they are making a comeback. I don't know.
    But, I don't believe what I read, when I see something else. When I see more wild birds, I'll believe that there are more wild birds.

  3. #63
    Senior Member HNTFSH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    1,195

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Flint View Post
    That style of hunting holds no appeal to me whatsoever. Neither does the type of cover that HNTFSH showed in the earlier pic. If that’s what turns you on, I agree there’s no good reason to train your dog to be steady.

    I hunt these days solely for the dog work. I prefer to hunt either by myself or w/ on or 2 guys who appreciate the same things I do- watching a dog run according to the wind conditions, find birds w/ his nose from a long way off then driving in w/ a hard flush to present a sporting shot. Steadiness is a refinement that lets the dog mark the fall & I train year around on these skills so that if I do screw up & break a wing leaving the bird w/ his legs, I expect my dog to race to the AOF & pick up the trail to find the cripple. For me that’s all part of the enjoyment of a good dog & the ability to successfully trail a running bird separates the great ones from the rest.

    A long time ago, I realized that my shooting skill was the weak link in the team so I applied myself to getting better. I guess I don't understand training a dog to be exceptional at his job w/out doing the work to keep up your end of the bargain. One thing I’ve seen is that many hunters gear up w/ tight chokes & heavy loads suitable for shooting long birds that they don’t have the skill to hit. Then they either destroy or blow the wing off of the birds that they do shoot at 20 yds. I watched a couple years ago as a guy clobbered just such a bird only to have his dog come up empty. We were nearing the truck so I got my Springer out & took him back to the feathers. He put his nose down & took off down the hill about 100 yds bringing back a very lively rooster w/ one wing completely missing.

    Pheasants are a large bird and relatively slow getting off the ground. You’ve got more time than you think to let it pick a direction & kill it cleanly. Then you won’t need to have a dog play center fielder ready to catch the bird before it runs off.
    We don't have those wide open spaces here like SD does. We don't do drives either, not enough birds, too many escape routes (versus driving miles forward in 1,000 acre fields). I hunt alone or with one other guy/dog.

    As far a cover - switch grass is prime run and elude cover.
    We shoot dogs with a Canon

  4. #64
    Senior Member HNTFSH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    1,195

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by copterdoc View Post
    I don't know why the numbers are down. But, I know that they are.

    Maybe they are making a comeback. I don't know.
    But, I don't believe what I read, when I see something else. When I see more wild birds, I'll believe that there are more wild birds.
    You mean when you see a couple dozen by the road grabbing grit instead of working a dog out looking for them I presume.
    We shoot dogs with a Canon

  5. #65
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    2,897

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Flint View Post
    That style of hunting holds no appeal to me whatsoever. .

    .
    What style of hunting are you referring to?

  6. #66
    Senior Member Dave Flint's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Central Texas
    Posts
    495

    Default

    Driven hunts using flankers, & blockers. Cover where you can't see the dogs. Birds flush & everybody shoots. Party limits.

    Not my cup of tea.

    Reading the dog & going w/ him to take a runner is the ultimate team sport for me. I like the physicality of it. It lets me share in the legacy of the pre-historic human & his canine companion in working together to bring home a meal.
    Last edited by Dave Flint; 03-24-2013 at 10:03 PM.
    "The bird hunter watches only the dog, and always knows where the dog is, whether or not visible at the moment. The dog’ nose is the bird hunters eye. Many hunters who carry a shotgun in season have never learned to watch the dog, or interpret his reaction to scent."
    Aldo Leopold, Round River

  7. #67
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    2,897

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Flint View Post
    Driven hunts using flankers, & blockers. Cover where you can't see the dogs. Birds flush & everybody shoots. Party limits.

    Not my cup of tea.

    Reading the dog & going w/ him to take a runner is the ultimate team sport for me. I like the physicality of it. It lets me share in the legacy of the pre-historic human & his canine companion in working together to bring home a meal.
    Not my favorite way to hunt either. However it is a common hunting scenario.
    Whether it's your cup of tea or not, Having a dog trailing a cripple is not conducive to this common style of hunting

  8. #68
    Senior Member Dave Flint's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Central Texas
    Posts
    495

    Default

    I forgot to mention, cringing as 2 or 3 dogs struggle to bring back the same bird & the guy who couldn't hit the ground if he dropped his shotgun yelling "I got him!"
    "The bird hunter watches only the dog, and always knows where the dog is, whether or not visible at the moment. The dog’ nose is the bird hunters eye. Many hunters who carry a shotgun in season have never learned to watch the dog, or interpret his reaction to scent."
    Aldo Leopold, Round River

  9. #69
    Senior Member gdgnyc's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    2,230

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Flint View Post
    I forgot to mention, cringing as 2 or 3 dogs struggle to bring back the same bird & the guy who couldn't hit the ground if he dropped his shotgun yelling "I got him!"
    Sounds pretty chaotic to me. Up until now, I had wanted to try it.
    "I love the rod and gun and where they take me."

  10. #70
    Senior Member HNTFSH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    1,195

    Default

    Seems to me the method needs to match the madness. Wide open spaces with thousand acre plots and limited cut-off points require a much different tactic than 50/100 acre plantings. Birds would far prefer to run than fly.

    In our small spaces usually surrounded by farm or private property the goal is pinching the bird to flight. That requires a sometimes sophisticated dance with the dog and the bird, becoming your own blocker by spacing yourself relative to the dog and the bird in the best position to force a mistake.

    That's harder to do in the big spaces of the Plains.
    We shoot dogs with a Canon

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •