The RetrieverTraining.Net Forums The Retriever Academy
Total Retriever Training with Mike Lardy
Hawkeye Media Gunners Up Tritronics Outdoor Media
Page 9 of 10 FirstFirst ... 78910 LastLast
Results 81 to 90 of 91

Thread: Question for upland hunters

  1. #81
    Senior Member HNTFSH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    1,195

    Default

    And BTW Dave - couldn't agree more with your sig line. It's the focus on the dog and readability that tells you everything you need to know about the bird. And why I'm not a conversationalist when working behind my dog.
    We shoot dogs with a Canon

  2. #82
    Senior Member HNTFSH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    1,195

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by RetrieverNation View Post
    Here are a couple of good articles on Illinois Ringnecks. The first one is from 2010 and a lot of good information on the population. Second one is current stats.
    http://www.gameandfishmag.com/2010/1..._il_aa111604a/

    http://www.dnr.illinois.gov/hunting/...rtPheasant.pdf

    Fifteen years ago I could walk ditches and railroad tracks to get wild ringnecks in my area, but today those some places do not produce. When I call the farmers I know, they tell me if the farm has birds or not and whether it is a waste of time. Pheasant Farms should be called dog training, not real hunting but in my area a lot of people think going to the Game Farm is hunting.

    I dont see a problem holding a high standard in training and letting the dog slide a bit when the conditions warrant, like your wild bird hunts with incredible cover and/or multiple dogs. Allowing the dog to get loose during hunting season keeps the pro trainers in business retraining them every spring for test/trial season!
    Thanks for posting the articles. Pretty consistent with what we see in Ohio. I've been at 10-12 roosters bagged a year, 3 times the hen flushes and probably another 10-12 wild rooster flushes. Can't think of any day over the last 10 years we weren't at least 'birdy' 6 times in an outing. None of those game farm refugees or released, rogue birds.

    It's work but it's fun dog work. Makes hunting up a duck cripple seem pretty easy from a perseverance perspective.

    It's the hunting 'blinds' I have to retrain at season end. Those are sloppy but fit the situation.
    We shoot dogs with a Canon

  3. #83
    Senior Member copterdoc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    NW IL
    Posts
    2,428

    Default

    There wasn't a dramatic and sudden change in "habitat" that pretty much flat-lined the wild pheasant population in the mid 90's.

    Something did. But, it wasn't "habitat".

  4. #84
    Senior Member HNTFSH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    1,195

    Default

    It wasn't a hard southeast drop and you can see the rebound a bit. Some of it's cyclical, a few region droughts can be devastating as a few very wet, colder springs can be. Poult aren't waterproof and chill to death quickly in an overly wet spring.
    We shoot dogs with a Canon

  5. #85
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Northern IL
    Posts
    129

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by copterdoc View Post
    There wasn't a dramatic and sudden change in "habitat" that pretty much flat-lined the wild pheasant population in the mid 90's.

    Something did. But, it wasn't "habitat".
    My guess is predators. See a lot more of everything that eats them. Heck, I cannot even identify all the different hawks I see these days. Would need to carry a bird book with me. Redtails and owls were about all I could spot 15 years ago, and it was something to talk about. Have also noticed a new hawk that is built like a tank and hunts under the canopy. Never seen these until a few years ago.
    Erik B.

  6. #86
    Senior Member copterdoc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    NW IL
    Posts
    2,428

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by HNTFSH View Post
    It wasn't a hard southeast drop and you can see the rebound a bit. Some of it's cyclical, a few region droughts can be devastating as a few very wet, colder springs can be. Poult aren't waterproof and chill to death quickly in an overly wet spring.
    From what I see in field, I believe the minor rises and falls since the mid 90's, are rather insignificant. I believe they can be attributed primarily to inconsistencies in data collection.

    I don't know what happened in the mid 90's. But, something happened. And they aren't bouncing back from it.

  7. #87
    Senior Member HNTFSH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    1,195

    Default

    Go find one or two and consider your dogs hunted! It's the 'test' a bird creates and not a judge.
    We shoot dogs with a Canon

  8. #88

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Flint View Post
    I’ve seen this happen quite often when hunting w/ multiple “non-steady” dogs. They get accustomed to chasing a bird but having another dog get there first. Quite often they give a cursory search, then they figure somebody must have got it already so they just peel off & start hunting for another one. There’s no sense of responsibility to come up w/ the bird.

    In my opinion, the dog that found & flushed the bird deserves the retrieve, even if the bird falls closer to another dog. The primary difference between a productive dog & a laggard is that the productive dog has a stronger desire to find birds. If every bird he produces gets stolen by a breaking dog, he can lose some of his motivation to find them.

    I doubt many of us send multiple dogs on a single retrieve in training but what do you think would happen if you did? One dog will prove to be faster or more aggressive & the other will eventually accept it & lose enthusiasm. That’s what happens when you hunt w/ non-steady dogs. You end up w/ one dog that gets most of the retrieves. Sometimes he’ll even start to pay more attention to the other dogs to see if they produce a bird so he can steal it rather than trying to find his own birds.
    Yes I saw this poaching behavior start to form over a couple days of hunting. Even when my dog found ground scent the other two dogs would show a little interest but would rather just hang out and let my dog work it out and then try to steal the retrieves. Many times when a bird was shot they would start the chase and the bird would take a change of direction before going down. My dog would beat them to the retrieve beacuse she saw where the bird had landed and the other two dogs ran to where thay saw the bird get shot. That could send them 30 - 40 yrads in the wrong direction. I also learned really quick to keep a dead bird in my vest and would toss it as a reward if my dog had a retrieve stolen. Like the one you saw in that short video. Seocnds before that bird flushed you could see my dog spring up out of the grass and look at me she was on that bird and looked to see where I was. The bird ran back to me and then flushed. When that bird was shot and landed it ran back past us and my dog tracked it down about 80 yards later and got another flush and harvested it that time. The golden stole it that time. My dog got a tossed dead reward bird. And a huge amount of praise from me.

    And as you saw in the video my dog is steady to flush and gun fire no whistle needed. I don't own an e-collar either.
    Last edited by Im_with_Brandy; 03-25-2013 at 04:18 PM.
    New retriever Champ 5/10/2014
    UH HRCH Brandywine Sue MH
    & GLSD: Finished Upland, Finished Retriever
    2013 GLSD Finished High point dog of the year.

  9. #89
    Senior Member Tim Mc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Elyria, Ohio
    Posts
    110

    Default

    I belong to a club in Ohio where we hunt pen raised birds. I will only put out planted birds for a guest, especially if we have a youth hunter. I want to make sure they get some opportunities and have fun. Otherwise, I hunt the stray birds that others have left behind. It's more of a challenge for the dogs, as opposed to ten birds in three strips of cover and a half hour hunt. We may hunt for a couple hours for a flush or two, sometimes nothing. It's as close to hunting natural birds as I can get around here. Hopefully, that will be changing as I have seen a few farmers get with the PF program . Nice to see those wide grassy hedgerows starting to show up. Hopefully, it will gain some momentum and make a difference.

  10. #90
    Senior Member HNTFSH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    1,195

    Default

    Tim - agreed that is the best way (residual birds) to train a solid upland retriever in non-producing states like ours.
    We shoot dogs with a Canon

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •