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Thread: Pups vs Started dogs

  1. #1
    Junior Member
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    Default Pups vs Started dogs

    I was doing some research on pups VS started dogs. My conclusion led me to believe started dogs might be the way to go given my situation. New baby on the way, 6 year starting tee-ball, shift work and odd days off to meet up with others and train. It seems litters range from the $600-1200 range. Plus all things considered to get the pup to a started dogs level. This simple math adds up to $2000-2500 depending on how much is taught and it's level compared to starters. I have seen starters in that pricing neighborhood. Just a hard pill to swallow up front. Either way the research needs to be done on both dogs, the breeder and trainers/training(dog). There is a breeder here that has a grandson of Dakota's Cajun Roux. From what I read, this dog was amazing. This is all new to me so forgive my ignorance if that is incorrect reference the Roux dog.

    Just want to make an informed decision before making the purchase. Which will be a bit before I pull the trigger. Thoughts on pups VS starters?

    Thanks,
    Rocky

  2. #2
    Senior Member sdnordahl's Avatar
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    Sounds like a started dog might be they way to go. However "started" is a loose term. The word started can mean so many different lvls of training. You need to know what you want. I would also strongly recommend you see the dog work in person so you can see what your buying. And 2k might be a little low. Depending on the training lvl your looking for.

    I pulled this from a different forum but its some food for thought.
    Two grand would be a steal.
    $800 (or more) for a well bred dog that has a health guarantee
    $200-$300 for vet bills
    $300 in food expenses (just a guess)
    $100 in misc training equuipment (ducks, primers...)
    $300 in gas to take the dog training
    $???? for your time training the dog.
    Last edited by sdnordahl; 03-24-2013 at 08:18 AM.
    Steven

    Nordahl's First Flight (Sadie)

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    Wild Meadow Retrievers

  3. #3
    Senior Member Mark Teahan's Avatar
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    I, like you, didn't have the time to start with a puppy, nor the knowledge, to properly train a puppy.
    You did't make it clear of what your intended purpose of your lab would be.
    Mine was a buddy and waterfowl hunting partner. I went the started dog route, and couldn't be happier.
    We have bonded really well, he's a retrieving machine, and all around great dog.
    He has 2 passes towards his Jr hunt test and will run again the end of April.
    We are also doing the doggie games.

    Go started and don't look back. Make sure you make the time to bond.
    Last edited by Mark Teahan; 03-24-2013 at 08:22 AM.

  4. #4
    Senior Member DropinBack's Avatar
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    You can also have the best of both worlds... A Puppy for the kids for a couple of months and then "send it away" to get well trained by a trainer... Not all up front at once and the result should be similar then a started dog... and you have have it trained for your needs....

  5. #5
    Senior Member grnhd's Avatar
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    It sounds to me in your situation that a started dog might be the way to go. Here's a thought,you could spend $800-$1000 on puppy plus shots,feeding etc and at the end up not having what you really wanted because you didnt have the time to get it there or you could spend $2500 and have a dog you want. Which one seems more like a waste of money?

  6. #6
    Senior Member sdnordahl's Avatar
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    I dropped $1500 on a pup just under a yr ago. Feed+vet+training gear+my time and gas I'm well over 2500. Started sounds like the way to go for you. Just remember you have to find time to train even a started dog. They all need maintained and depending on the lvl further training.

    Im speaking from experience. Get the dog b4 the kid shows. After that it will become a harder pill to swallow.
    Steven

    Nordahl's First Flight (Sadie)

    Nordahl's Dream in Extreme JH (Dixie)

    Nordahl's Flyin High (Sky) RIP


    Wild Meadow Retrievers

  7. #7
    Senior Member Steve Shaver's Avatar
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    A started dog is cheaper in the long run. With the started dog there is more up front cost but if you do your home work you will also know what kind of dog your getting up front. A started dog from the right trainer could be much better than what you may end up with from a pup depending on your level of experience in training. Not trying to be offensive here. I can give you a few places to look if your interested just send me a PM

  8. #8

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    If I had it to do over, and if $ is a concern started may be the best route. In my case, I pad $1k for a pup (from 2 Grand dogs) and got him at 7 weeks. The family and kids all had a ball with him, he chewed off many wood corners, leather couch legs, pillows, laptop charger cords, etc After spending another $500 or so on shots, vet visits, food etc I sent him off to a HT pro at 6 months old. He's now been there for 6 +months----- so grand total invested so far is about $5100 (who's counting) and he's not yet done any handling work, but about to start. He is stepping on 300 yard marks and has been a while--- but a ways to go to get a handler I'd imagine. Understand that most pros take it slow and steady, and learning reasons as much as income reasons. Another thing, if you originally bought the pup as a family pet, and then send it off for months the fam will worry the heck out of you when they are gonna get their dog back. My next purchased dog will be started for sure, and know what I'm getting--- and then send to a pro if need be..... And be about $2500 ahead (4 months of training to add transition handling) to a started dog and have a happy family that our pup was not off at a trainer for 10 months of his first 16 months.

  9. #9
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    sdnordahl, the numbers you came up with were very close to what I came up with. As far as dog before kiddo, that ain't happenin. Doc may induce tomorrow. Thanks all for the advice odds are I will begin with a started dog. Level of training obviously depends on how much I want spend. Not 100% sure of the direction I'll take my lab. May try duck hunting on ocasssion. It's not my cup of tea as previously discussed. May go to events in the futre. ONe thing for sure is he/she will work at their given sport. I really have longed, since childhood, for the companionship of a lab. You know load up, go to the woods, plant food plots, hike around, camp fires, stuff and etc...

    Droppin Back, love the idea. Especilly for the pup's NAMEsake. When the boys (6 and newborn)get attached to the pup they probably wouldn't understand that it will go to school later. Me, I'd be fine, but it would be rough not having my buddy around.

    Steve I'll probably hit you up soon. At least I can start my homework.

    Thanks,
    Rocky

  10. #10
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    Started to me typically means ff, cc and ob work done. The ones i sell also have seen marks from day one. But I can't get it to pencil out from my perspective for much less than $4000. Start with a nice pup(1000), food, shots, etc., but the variable people miss is the compensation for socializing/working with the puppy in age 2-5 months. Figure 300 per month to get them going right. Then 3 months of quality training (600) to be ready to sell at around 8-9 months old. Ad to boot that I'm taking the risk on a puppy being a dud, and it does happen. If you can buy a good one for 2500 your getting one hell of a good deal! Do a search as this topic has been discussed several times before. Do remember that usually you get what you pay for. Make sure you have enough input to determine a good deal vs. someone else's problem.

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