The RetrieverTraining.Net Forums The Retriever Academy
Total Retriever Training with Mike Lardy
Hawkeye Media Gunners Up Tritronics Outdoor Media
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 21 to 30 of 30

Thread: dog barks one time when sending on marks.

  1. #21
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Illinois Wisconsin border
    Posts
    884

    Default

    Yeah the noise thing wasn't all Cosmo. Abe pups had a tendency to be vocal ( Webshire's Honest Abe) . My guy was out of him and my Criquet, barked in the crate, got on him, whined a little through the Derby, got on him. Started to run the all-age with him, multiple mark started to yodel, howl, you name it. Did all the standard correct things, no bird if he makes noise, staked him out in a hlding blind, , bark collars worn with regular collar. Once shot 20 flyers during the week
    Got them for 4 bucks a piece. He was quiet for the weekend Jammed a Amateur. Ran the following weekend Lance Brown judged, had to release so many birds on the private property where the trial was held. Lance released a flying poison bird to run with a blind, they flew all over. He started to bird chirp on the honor a little. Ok not bad ran at Manitowoc , he was so loud he scared a puppy 100 yards away. Picked him up no bird. Gunned with Mike Lardy at a amateur, picked Mike's brain on the noise issue. Gave me some thoughts said finally, I would sell him for a lot if money Earl. Was offered a lot of money, National caliber dog, turned it down. Noise got worse, I can fix it. Ran him again, Dennis Voight and Vickie Worthington judged him. Bragged a little about what I was offered. After he went nuts on the line, Vickie said he was worth about 28 cents now. Pros wouldn't take him. He was a marking machine and a water blind master, of course never did it in training. It went on and on finally retired him after he one whistled a 350 yard multiple entry water blind at the Iron Range trial, Virgina, Mn. In a big open, then went nuts in the water quad and double handled him. What a heartbreaker. He was my buddy and hunting partner after that. Now tell ne about noise issues.
    The more he was corrected for noise the more unruly he became on the line. Push in one area, comes out in another.
    Should have jumped on it when he was nine months old.
    Last edited by Criquetpas; 03-25-2013 at 12:09 PM.
    Earl Dillow

  2. #22
    Senior Member John Robinson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Bigfork, Montana
    Posts
    3,210

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by blake_mhoona View Post
    the noise i'm talking about is after marks are down and the dog is in position and waiting on his name to be released. right after you say his name he launches off the mat/stand/box and gives a little yelp. it is a prey drive and it is instinctual. but i dont think it should be tolerated. instinct and prey drive says to get to the bird the fastest way possible (run the bank) and to avoid the water if you can. it shouldnt be tolerated. same applies.

    why would lardy (or any other pro) correct this behavior and make a point to show it on his dvd if it is no big deal?

    now granted if its an older dog then its going to be near impossible to overcome. if its a pup i think it is easily corrected.
    I'm certainly not going to argue with Mike Lardy, it's been years since I watched the tapes so I don't remember that part, I'm just passing on my personal experience with dogs. Dog training is an interesting mix of art and science. On the one hand we all know that it is important to set high standards and consitantly uphold those standards with your dog in training and trialing, on the other hand, as Stan says, in dog training you need to pick your battles. Add to that you need to read dogs and dog problems to know when a certain fix has potential to create a large problem elsewhere.

    Having seen dogs that were truly vocal and watching very experienced trainers struggle to fix the problem, seen other dogs where a small problem was ignored until it turned into a big problem, and others where what really wasn't a problem was dealt with wrongly, then turned into a problem, it sometimes hard to read. The art is being able to recognize each situation early on and decide the correct approach. Based on the short description in the OP's post I don't think it is a problem worth dealing with, but that's the problem with internet training advise, you really need to see it in person before you offer advise.

    John

  3. #23
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Benton, AR
    Posts
    771

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by road kill View Post
    I am anxious to learn how.
    my original post (#2 on thread) this is exactly what lardy does and describes. and what i did. i guess i should of prefaced my "easily" comment by saying for me it was.

  4. #24
    Senior Member road kill's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    New Berlin, WI
    Posts
    10,654

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by blake_mhoona View Post
    my original post (#2 on thread) this is exactly what lardy does and describes. and what i did. i guess i should of prefaced my "easily" comment by saying for me it was.
    A dog with a high anxiety noise issue will not be corrected that easily.
    Like Earl has stated (and he has earned some stripes) there are different kinds of noise.
    Some are in the genes pretty deeply.
    In our case, there was no 1 quick fix, and I don't think there is for a true HI-Dog.
    They just go places that can't easily be reached.



    I have lived it and I still am.
    It is an issue we deal with every day, every training session, every test.

    It is a lot better, but I believe it is just in some dogs soul.

    The want them some more bird.


    JMO
    Stan b & Elvis

  5. #25
    Junior Member Fran Seagren's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Pacific NW
    Posts
    18

    Default

    I want to hear! THANKS.

  6. #26
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Benton, AR
    Posts
    771

    Default

    I would consider mine a high drive dog. To him not getting the retrieve is more pressure than any cuff on the chin or nick. With him it was all about timing the millisecond after a yelp it was a no here and he knew what he did. Again like I said we ran into it when he was like 8 months and nipped it then.

  7. #27
    Senior Member Randy Bohn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Pa.
    Posts
    340

    Default

    Most young dogs that have desire to retrieve are noisy sometime thru there training. When you run JH there isn't much for a dog to hate about that part of his life. Issues could really start down the road when multiples are thrown, as a trainer you need to figure out if noise is because manners are bad (obedience) or genetics is taking over(good luck) A little yelp off line never hurt anybody BUT if you could look into the crystal ball you may wish you fixed the dog real early in the dogs career. My guess for this dog is tighten up on some obedience and the yip off line will probably go away, but that's just a guess...Randy
    CHRIS ATKINSON...PLEASE don't QUIT CHANGING MY PROFILE PAGE!!

    "And if you have a golden, bring TWO towels!"

  8. #28
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by John Robinson View Post
    I wouldn't try to stop it, by putting pressure on it, (attrition is pressure), you may make it worse. A little yelp of excitement as the dog launches is no big deal in AKC, as a judge I actually like seeing that kind of energy. Also that problem will go away by itself as the dog matures and running marks becomes routine.

    John
    Thanks John. Thats what I needed know.

  9. #29
    Senior Member badbullgator's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    somewhere between Boca Grande and Mims
    Posts
    7,112

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by John Robinson View Post
    I think we need to make a distinction between the typical vocal dog that whines or even barks on line in anticipation versus the little yelp or bark as the dog launches. I believe that stopping the dog in the second scenario and using a zero tolerance approach is more likely to lead to that first situation problem dog. That's just my opinion, maybe Randy B can pipe in on this.

    John
    This is my opinion as well. There is a difference between a single bark on release and excessive noise on the line. A good way to turn a single bark into excessive noise is to spend time trying to correct the single bark. In most young dogs it goes away by itself.
    A bark or yelp is not "barking" in my book. When I judge pay no attention to a single bark or yelp off the line.
    Views and opinions expressed herein by Badbullgator do not necessarily represent the policies or position of RTF. RTF and all of it's subsidiaries can not be held liable for the off centered humor and politically incorrect comments of the author.
    Corey Burke

  10. #30
    Senior Member gdgnyc's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    2,317

    Default

    In my opinion, the vocal issue can be a result of one of many causes. 1) Bark of joy 2) Anxiety 3) Extremely high prey drive 4) Totally genetic 5) Pressure from force fetching 6) The dog views noise as more rewarding than anything you have to offer (self reinforcing and of high value) 7) Attention getter

    My own personal experience---bark of joy, leave it alone; pressure from force fetching, it goes away; anxiety, can be dealt with but you must stay on top of it; self reinforcing, can't deal with it; genetic, you have got problems.

    Two of the best threads on this was one by Randy Bohn and another by road kill.
    "I love the rod and gun and where they take me."

    "Do not judge a man until you have walked two moons in his moccasins."

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •