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Thread: Dog Food Dispenser

  1. #11
    Senior Member Swack's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by WapsiRanger View Post
    The food would be stored in a plastic hopper, which would be no different than how I have read most people store their food. I am thinking the hopper could store a bag at a time.
    Dude,

    It's not about convenience; it's about preserving the freshness of the product! High quality food can spoil if not sealed against oxidation. Go ahead and market your contrapation to the uninformed. It's not for me!

    Swack
    Jeff Swackhamer

  2. #12
    Senior Member FOM's Avatar
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    What a tough crowd....I wouldn't use one cause I only have 3 dogs, but I say if you got the desire I bet you can sell it. Think about humane societies and such....grey hound kennels, etc....good luck. I think it's awesome to see someone with entrepreneur spirit....

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  3. #13
    Member Chuck Wagner's Avatar
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    The idea is great, but the product is already out there. These are pricey, but if you've got a bunch of dogs to deal with on a daily basis...I'm sure they eventually pay for themselves. http://www.quickfeed.com/products/de...ic-Feeder.aspx.
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  4. #14
    Senior Member Steve Shaver's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck Wagner View Post
    The idea is great, but the product is already out there. These are pricey, but if you've got a bunch of dogs to deal with on a daily basis...I'm sure they eventually pay for themselves. http://www.quickfeed.com/products/de...ic-Feeder.aspx.
    I certainly wouldn't pay that much. I have 3 I bought from cabelas for $30 a piece. Easy enough to measure by how long you open and close the handle. Mine hold #40 wish they held more. Swack since we are all so uninformed why don't you spell out the danger of keeping food in a sealed plastic container for a week. I'd eat it myself if I had a taste for dog food.

  5. #15
    Senior Member Swack's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Shaver View Post
    I certainly wouldn't pay that much. I have 3 I bought from cabelas for $30 a piece. Easy enough to measure by how long you open and close the handle. Mine hold #40 wish they held more. Swack since we are all so uninformed why don't you spell out the danger of keeping food in a sealed plastic container for a week. I'd eat it myself if I had a taste for dog food.
    Steve,

    Thanks for asking. I am not an expert in the field of canine nutrition, so I'll relate portions of an article written by Steve Brown, a dog food formulator, researcher, and author on canine nutrition. The two books he has authored on canine nutrition are See Spot Live Longer (now in its 8th printing) and Unlocking the Canine Ancestral Diet. Here are some quotes from the article Fat's Chance which appeared in the December 2012 issue of The Whole Dog Journal.

    "As soon as a food is manufactured, it begins to undergo a variety of chemical and physical changes. It's a basic law of the universe (the second law of thermodynamics) that everything degrades over time. This includes the proteins and vitamins in dog foods, but it's the fats I worry about the most."

    "Dogs require fats in their diet. However, fats are among the most chemically fragile nutrients in dog food; they are the limiting factor to the shelf life of most dog foods. Fats that have degraded - gone 'rancid' - can cause all sorts of health problems for dogs." "All fats chemically react to and degrade with exposure to oxygen; this is called oxidation. Oxidized fats are said to be rancid; they have degraded from a nutritionally beneficial substance to one that is actually toxic to animals."

    "Rancid fats reduce the nutritive value of the protein, and degrade vitamins and antioxidants. That bears repeating: rancid fats can so vastly reduce the benefit your dog can get from the proteins and vitamins present in his food, that he can suffer from protein and vitamin deficiencies. Rancid fats can also cause diarreha, liver and heart problems, macular degeneration, cell damage, cancer, arthritis, and death. It's a good policy to avoid feeding rancid fats to our dogs."

    "All of the omega-3 fats are fragile - they turn rancid quickly - with the long-chain omega-3 fats EPA and DHA among the most fragile."

    "If using a food container, keep the food in its original bag and place the bag in the container."

    This is a very brief synopsis of the article highlighting the potential dangers of allowing dog food to spoil. Leaving dog food in a sealed plastic container is not adequate to preserve the freshness of the dog food we all pay good money for. The "dead air space" within the container has plenty of free oxygen in it and will hasten oxidation. The natural antioxidants that are commonly used in today's dog food formulations are not as effecitive as some of the chemical antioxidants used in the past, such as ethoxiquin. For these reasons I choose to store openned dog food in the bag, rolled tightly closed with as much of the air squeezed out as possible, with a weighted object on top of the bag to keep it closed.

    In the interest of fairness to the author and the publisher I feel I must add that reproductions of the article are available from The Whole Dog Journal; 800-829-9165 or on-line at whole-dog-journal.com/cs.

    Swack
    Jeff Swackhamer

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Swack View Post
    Steve,

    Thanks for asking. I am not an expert in the field of canine nutrition, so I'll relate portions of an article written by Steve Brown, a dog food formulator, researcher, and author on canine nutrition. The two books he has authored on canine nutrition are See Spot Live Longer (now in its 8th printing) and Unlocking the Canine Ancestral Diet. Here are some quotes from the article Fat's Chance which appeared in the December 2012 issue of The Whole Dog Journal.

    "As soon as a food is manufactured, it begins to undergo a variety of chemical and physical changes. It's a basic law of the universe (the second law of thermodynamics) that everything degrades over time. This includes the proteins and vitamins in dog foods, but it's the fats I worry about the most."

    "Dogs require fats in their diet. However, fats are among the most chemically fragile nutrients in dog food; they are the limiting factor to the shelf life of most dog foods. Fats that have degraded - gone 'rancid' - can cause all sorts of health problems for dogs." "All fats chemically react to and degrade with exposure to oxygen; this is called oxidation. Oxidized fats are said to be rancid; they have degraded from a nutritionally beneficial substance to one that is actually toxic to animals."

    "Rancid fats reduce the nutritive value of the protein, and degrade vitamins and antioxidants. That bears repeating: rancid fats can so vastly reduce the benefit your dog can get from the proteins and vitamins present in his food, that he can suffer from protein and vitamin deficiencies. Rancid fats can also cause diarreha, liver and heart problems, macular degeneration, cell damage, cancer, arthritis, and death. It's a good policy to avoid feeding rancid fats to our dogs."

    "All of the omega-3 fats are fragile - they turn rancid quickly - with the long-chain omega-3 fats EPA and DHA among the most fragile."

    "If using a food container, keep the food in its original bag and place the bag in the container."

    This is a very brief synopsis of the article highlighting the potential dangers of allowing dog food to spoil. Leaving dog food in a sealed plastic container is not adequate to preserve the freshness of the dog food we all pay good money for. The "dead air space" within the container has plenty of free oxygen in it and will hasten oxidation. The natural antioxidants that are commonly used in today's dog food formulations are not as effecitive as some of the chemical antioxidants used in the past, such as ethoxiquin. For these reasons I choose to store openned dog food in the bag, rolled tightly closed with as much of the air squeezed out as possible, with a weighted object on top of the bag to keep it closed.

    In the interest of fairness to the author and the publisher I feel I must add that reproductions of the article are available from The Whole Dog Journal; 800-829-9165 or on-line at whole-dog-journal.com/cs.

    Swack
    So do you vacuum pack portions to avoid exposure to oxygen? Practically speaking, a covered bin is meant to keep critters out, not oxygen.

  7. #17
    Senior Member Swack's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Olliedog View Post
    So do you vacuum pack portions to avoid exposure to oxygen? Practically speaking, a covered bin is meant to keep critters out, not oxygen.
    Olliedog,

    No, I don't vacuum pack portions to avoid exposure to oxygen, but it would be a good thing to do to preserve the quality of the food. The Orijen dog food I buy comes vacuum packed in foil bags, which are more effective at keeping oxygen out than are the typical paper/plastic dog food bags.

    As you point out, a covered bin isn't meant to keep oxygen out and that's why I choose not to store my dog food in such a container.

    Swack
    Jeff Swackhamer

  8. #18
    Senior Member mitty's Avatar
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    Once you open the vacuum packed bag, the fats are subject to oxidation.

    An open bag of dog food vs a clean food safe bin...as far as oxidation how are they different?
    Renee P

  9. #19
    Senior Member Steve Shaver's Avatar
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    Well all I know is that I have been storing my dog food the same way for years without any effect. Just cant believe it could go bad almost instantly upon opening. Maybe some one could make a liquid food in a sealed container with a straw and the dogs could learn to suck it right out of the bag to avoid oxidation. Think I'll also devlope a helmet for my dog to wear while running and get him a life jacket for swimming. Think I'll also keep him in on days of bad air quality. Also going to request our retriever club treat the ponds on our training grounds, cant have my dog swimming in the yucky water. They also need to clear the grounds of all the goose poop before a trial so my dog wont be eating any of it and I want contestants wearing sterile booties on their shoes and every dog should have a current health certificate before entering the grounds. I could go on and on but it's just making me more paranoid

  10. #20
    Senior Member mitty's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Shaver View Post
    Well all I know is that I have been storing my dog food the same way for years without any effect. Just cant believe it could go bad almost instantly upon opening. Maybe some one could make a liquid food in a sealed container with a straw and the dogs could learn to suck it right out of the bag to avoid oxidation. Think I'll also devlope a helmet for my dog to wear while running and get him a life jacket for swimming. Think I'll also keep him in on days of bad air quality. Also going to request our retriever club treat the ponds on our training grounds, cant have my dog swimming in the yucky water. They also need to clear the grounds of all the goose poop before a trial so my dog wont be eating any of it and I want contestants wearing sterile booties on their shoes and every dog should have a current health certificate before entering the grounds. I could go on and on but it's just making me more paranoid
    If you take a whiff of your dog food container and it smells nasty, that's a sign but otherwise I think it's safe to go with the dates printed on the bags of dog food. Fats in human foods go off, too. Shelf life is not a problem unique to dog food.
    Renee P

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