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Thread: Anyone here have a pond areator?

  1. #1
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    Default Anyone here have a pond areator?

    I am looking at putting a Vertex system in my ponds to help the fish and cut down on the filamentous alge. Anyone here have much experience with these systems in dog training ponds?Chad
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    Senior Member Noah's Avatar
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    Call Adam at Jones Fish hatchery in Newport, KY 859-623-3679. I do some work with them and they are very good at pond management. I do know a bottom diffusing system wont interfere with training. Also, when put into an existing pond you need to gradually increase the amount of time the aerator is on overtime to prevent the possilbility of a fish kill.
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    Senior Member Sabireley's Avatar
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    You might look at adding Tilapia to eat the algae. They only live in warm water, breed quickly, and eat lots of algae. You need a permit to buy them in some states. You can read more about it on the pond boss forum http://www.pondboss.com. There is also good information about aerators.

    Edit: The Tilapia die when the water gets cold, so they will not take over the pond. You must add them every year in the Spring to keep the algae under control.
    Last edited by Sabireley; 04-08-2013 at 12:15 PM.

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    Senior Member Dan Wegner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sabireley View Post
    You might look at adding Tilapia to eat the algae. They only live in warm water, breed quickly, and eat lots of algae. You need a permit to buy them in some states. You can read more about it on the pond boss forum http://www.pondboss.com. There is also good information about aerators.
    And they're pretty good eatin' too! Real mild fish....
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    Senior Member Ken Bora's Avatar
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    Pond Air? wouldent you TN. folk just call your cousin Rufus
    who lives down the holler to come on up with his Chevy???

    "So what is big is not always the Trout nor the Deer but the chance, the being there. And what is full is not necessarily the creel nor the freezer, but the memory." ~ Aldo Leopold

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    Depends on what kind of fish you want to keep. Assuming you're talking bass/crappie pond simply adding a circulation system which has multiple zones usually is enough. I've worked on a system which had multiple diffusers and circulation pumps but, the guy was raising KOI and planned on having up to 100 in the pond. Another was a penguin display at a zoo but, that was just for looks.

    Fish friendly chemicals to target undesireable weeds aren't a bad idea either-

  7. #7
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    Ken if you only knew my buddy Rufus!! And yes where I live we have plenty of hollers and four wheel drives!
    No kidding I'm working with Greg Grimes from Lakework systems to install it for me next week, I have about 6 acres of ponds we are going to have like 12 stations setup with two pumps. I have alot of bass already just wanting to get a little better environment for them, the dogs, and the kids swimming hole. Also looks like I can keep the small duck hole opened up when everyone else is froze up at a very cheap price. My ponds are only like 6 yrs old but they are telling me the system will get rid of the muck on the bottom of the pond over a short amount of time and all the bad pond smells when you are swimming at 2 in the morning!
    CB
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    Senior Member Keith Stroyan's Avatar
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    I have a small photo-electric areator - runs air down a little tube to a diffuser.

    As far as I can tell it doesn't do anything for the filamentous algae... I use Cutrine+ expensive, but it works.

    I had a major problem with coontail and finally treated that with an aquatic herbicide. Then we had a major drought....

    I'm considering grass carp, but had been trying to have some vegetation for the ducklings. (And for hunting-training a little cover is nice. For the technical FT stuff, I guess bare banks are better.)

  9. #9
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    I put on waders and took samples of the weeds in the ponds where I live and shipped them off the week before last. Coontail and one other were the main problems.(can't remember the name for the life of me at the moment) The boss man is ordering chemicals. It's going to take two different types. One pellet and one spray. Once risk of flooding is over and water warms up to the recommended 55 degree mark...hope it makes a difference. They are too clogged to train by mid-late summer. Till then the weed-wacking, tree trimming and brush cutting is never ending. Folks will be happy this year and hopefully many more to follow. It's been a long while since the ponds have had much attention. Also working on earthwork permits with the county to make some changes but, in ever-liberal-land-tree-hugger-ville it's going to be tough. Hopefully getting a meeting with the permitting lady in two weeks. Between my unpaid/unofficial groundskeeper position, a real job bidding/installing liners all across the USA, training and pups, I'm a busy guy.

    After chemicals are applied and evidence is gone I'm going to put in for a permit to purchase the sterile grass carp as well- We have to go through the State Fish and Wildlife and I might not be able to get them because when it floods they can get into the river...

  10. #10
    Senior Member PalouseDogs's Avatar
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    The most effective long-term way to reduce filamentous algae (which, I'm guessing, is some type of blue-green algae, aka cyanobacteria) is to reduce the flow of excess nutrients into the pond. Sources of nutrients are fertilized grass, gardens, or farm fields that drain into the pond, or nearby livestock that add nutrients via both manure and churning up the ground. If you have control of adjacent lands, avoid or limit fertilizers and fence livestock away from most of the shorelines. If you can't control the runoff, it can help to have a buffer of unmowed vegetation around as much of the edge of the pond as feasible. The unmowed vegetation will help intercept silt and nutrients. Of course, you will have to balance nutrient reduction against the ideal retriever training pond design.

    If you are supplying food for the fish in the pond, you will also be adding loads of nutrients.

    If you go with an aerator, the extra oxygen will help prevent low dissolved oxygen that can occur especially towards the end of summer. More oxygen will support more fish, too. On the other hand, if the added oxygen allows your fish population to get really high and the aerator malfunctions..... You'll have a whole lot of fish you can scoop up and use for fertilizer.
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