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Thread: Speaking of Global Warming

  1. #241
    Senior Member huntinman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by paul young View Post
    After 49 years as a hunter, it still amazes me that a fellow hunter would have a problem with a wild predator killing a prey species (not domesticated livestock). As humans, we have the ability to get our food from a market or, if we choose, we can be like the wolf and kill our food ourselves. The wolf doesn't have that choice.

    I have no problem with wolf hunting to control their numbers, or hunting any other species, as long as it's done ethically. I have done plenty of killing myself, and hope to do some more!-Paul
    Who said I have a problem with the wolf doing what wolves do? Not me? My problem is with idiots who want to manage wildlife populations by emotion rather than common sense.... Politics rather than wildlife biology.
    Bill Davis

  2. #242
    Senior Member BonMallari's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by paul young View Post
    After 49 years as a hunter, it still amazes me that a fellow hunter would have a problem with a wild predator killing a prey species (not domesticated livestock). As humans, we have the ability to get our food from a market or, if we choose, we can be like the wolf and kill our food ourselves. The wolf doesn't have that choice.

    I have no problem with wolf hunting to control their numbers, or hunting any other species, as long as it's done ethically. I have done plenty of killing myself, and hope to do some more!-Paul
    I have a HUGE problem with what the wolves have done to the elk populations in Montana,Idaho,Wyoming and their encroachment into other western states...After getting further education in Alaska this summer from those who see it closer than most, I wont shed a tear for any wolf that is dispatched
    All my Exes live in Texas

    Quote Originally Posted by lanse brown View Post
    A few things that I learned still ring true. "Lanse when you get a gift, say thank you and walk away. When you get a screwing walk away. You are going to get a lot more screwings than gifts"

  3. #243
    Senior Member Gerry Clinchy's Avatar
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    Only a few of the young'uns on this Forum will be around by then to see if it turns out that way

    OTOH, we also know that Greenland was not always a frozen tundra; and places once underwater are now dry land ... for better or worse. If ancient creatures figured out a way to adapt and migrate, shouldn't we be able to do the same? Of course, they didn't have to contend with govt's central planning to "assist" them.
    G.Clinchy@gmail.com
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  4. #244
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    Quote Originally Posted by huntinman View Post
    Who said I have a problem with the wolf doing what wolves do? Not me? My problem is with idiots who want to manage wildlife populations by emotion rather than common sense.... Politics rather than wildlife biology.
    Wolves are wildlife right? Ask the wildlife biologists about wolf management in Alaska. All politics indeed. http://archive.audubonmagazine.org/i...ncite0907.html.

    What do you know about wildlife biology to be an expert? You and Bon seem to be exactly the type of people that want wildlife to be managed by emotion not science, kinda like your view on climate change.

  5. #245
    Senior Member BonMallari's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Henry V View Post
    Wolves are wildlife right? Ask the wildlife biologists about wolf management in Alaska. All politics indeed. http://archive.audubonmagazine.org/i...ncite0907.html.

    What do you know about wildlife biology to be an expert? You and Bon seem to be exactly the type of people that want wildlife to be managed by emotion not science, kinda like your view on climate change.
    You know nothing about my past: I have actually spent countless hours with two very qualified people involved with wildlife biology,my brother's college roommate and my friend the late Dan Boone was a wildlife biologist for the Texas Parks & Wildlife, he was the project manager on restoring the Eastern turkey in SE Texas, I have been on alligator surveys, bird count surveys, deer herd surveys and was taught to appreciate more than the animals we shoot for sport. I happen to have an affection for the peregrine falcon, and the red tailed hawk,saw my first Golden Eagle in Moab Utah two years ago, it was breath taking

    One of my retrieving mentors was George Wilson , he too was a game biologist for the Utah Div Natural Resources. I was along for the ride when he helped find and get access to what are now the summer field trial grounds in the Uintas

    I am no expert by any stretch of the imagination, but I have learned to talk to and listen to the REAL experts, the people who actually live in the areas on a day to day basis in the areas affected, they know more than any game biologist because its their backyard

    FTR : I am also against the stocking of the striper in many fisheries,because any time you introduce the apex predator, you are bound to affect another species in its place,,The introduction of the striper into Lakes Mead and Powell have killed off what used to be very good bass and trout fisheries
    All my Exes live in Texas

    Quote Originally Posted by lanse brown View Post
    A few things that I learned still ring true. "Lanse when you get a gift, say thank you and walk away. When you get a screwing walk away. You are going to get a lot more screwings than gifts"

  6. #246
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gerry Clinchy View Post
    ..................................................

    .................................................. ..............................Of course, they didn't have to contend with govt's central planning to "assist" them.
    Yes ! Exactly correct. Most countries governments are just like ours.......not very good at all. Ours is getting worse all the time. Evidently the old "saying" about people who refuse to study history ( and learn from it ) are doomed to repeat it's mistakes is true.............those people are alive and well in DC by all accounts.
    charly

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  7. #247
    Senior Member JDogger's Avatar
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    Can anyone say Haiyan?
    One cannot reason someone out of something they were not reasoned into. - Jonathan Swift

  8. #248
    Senior Member huntinman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Henry V View Post
    Wolves are wildlife right? Ask the wildlife biologists about wolf management in Alaska. All politics indeed. http://archive.audubonmagazine.org/i...ncite0907.html.

    What do you know about wildlife biology to be an expert? You and Bon seem to be exactly the type of people that want wildlife to be managed by emotion not science, kinda like your view on climate change.
    I've told you before... I don't suffer fools... So, I don't feel the need to explain anything to you. But, as for Alaska, lived up there over 20 years and had hunting partners and dog training partners who were wildlife biologists. So, got to hear a lot about the wolf issue over the years.

    As for your source.... Audubon? Really?
    Bill Davis

  9. #249
    Senior Member T. Mac's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JDogger View Post
    Can anyone say Haiyan?
    Huracán San Calixto

  10. #250
    Senior Member Golddogs's Avatar
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    Minnesota

    Report warns of climate threat to big game


    Conservation groups raise concerns



    By Steve Karnowski


    Associated Press


    Climate change threatens the big game animals that call Minnesota home — from moose to deer to bears — and the state needs to plan for how protect those species and the outdoor recreation economy that depends upon them, conservation groups warned Thursday.

    The National Wildlife Federation has released a report titled “Nowhere to Run: Big Game Wildlife in a Warming World,” which examines how “climate change is already having significant impacts on big game and their habitats” across the country due to higher temperatures, droughts, more frequent wildfires and other factors.

    “Moose are the poster child of climate change and Minnesota is demonstrating that,” said the study’s author, Doug Inkley, senior scientist with the federation.

    The report notes that moose are “superbly adapted” for deep snow and bitter cold. But the big, fuzzy animals are prone to heat stress, and they eat less when they suffer from it. The moose population in northwestern Minnesota, which had numbered around 4,000 in the mid-1980s, has nearly died out as summer temperatures have increased by 3 to 4 degrees. Meanwhile, northeastern Minnesota’s moose population has plummeted by 52 percent since 2010 to an estimated 2,760 last winter.

    Research indicates winter ticks and other parasites that survive mild winters, nutritional deficiencies resulting from a changing food supply in the forests, and drier bogs where moose could otherwise cool off may be among the reasons why Minnesota is losing its moose. The exact reasons aren’t clear. But those factors are all associated with climate change, said Leslie McInenly, big game program leader with the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.

    Moose aren’t the only big game animals in danger in Minnesota. Inkley and McInenly said even highly adaptable species such as white-tailed deer and black bears are at risk. So is the state’s small elk population. They cited threats from diseases, drought and habitat changes that a warmer climate could bring.

    The report cited epizootic hemorrhagic disease as a particular threat to deer. It has devastated populations in some other states. The disease is carried by midges, tiny biting insects also known as no-see-ums. During droughts, deer tend to concentrate in wet areas that support midge reproduction, Inkley said.

    The disease hasn’t been found in wild deer in Minnesota yet, McInenly said, but one case was confirmed in a cow last year. It has also turned up in neighboring states.

    “Certainly it’s here and it’s all around us. So I anticipate that’s something we will be facing soon,” she said.

    Changing forests and other habitat could also lead to more conflicts between humans and deer, bears and elk as the animals move into populated or agricultural areas in search of food, McInenly and Inkley said.

    The report said solutions require cutting carbon dioxide emissions, which are the root cause of climate change, by switching to cleaner sources of energy. It also calls for smarter approaches to wildlife management and habitat that take climate change into account. Inkley said Minnesota’s wildlife professionals began preparing “way ahead” of many other states.

    “What we need to look out here for are surprises,” Inkley said. “There will be surprises with climate change. And you don’t know what you don’t know. This is why it’s important that Minnesota is trying to look ahead with their management plans.”

    The federal government estimates Minnesotans spend about $260 million a year on big game hunting, noted Gary Botzek, executive director of the Minnesota Conservation Federation.

    The DNR has already sold nearly 450,000 licenses for the firearms deer season, which opened Saturday. And those figures don’t account for the growing spending by people who head into the outdoors just to observe wildlife, he said.

    “We have to rely and expect that our outdoor community will step forward and be part of the solution,” Botzek said.
    Never trust a dog to watch your food!

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