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Thread: Speaking of Global Warming

  1. #251
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    Let me tell you about where I grew up in W. Tn. 60 years ago, I doubt I even saw a deer there. Hit 2 in the last 11 months with my truck. Damage was $5,000. I almost never fail to see a deer when I go to the farm. Probably could kill one just by sitting outside my camper if I chose. More ducks than I can ever remember. Less than 10 years ago, you never saw a snow goose, now they are there in Lauderdale county alone by the 10's of thousands. Eating all the food the ducks used to eat so the number of ducks will probably decrease. Never saw a Bald Eagle but now see at least 2-3 every duck season. Hawks are always present when I am duck hunting. Doves are plentiful but there is so much food they are scattered and relatively hard to hunt. There are rabbits but the coyotes eat them. Also qual are for the most part non-existant due to the coyotes. When I was young they were plentiful. Never saw or heard of turkey when I was young but now they are there in significant numbers as well as turkey hunters.

    Just a few things I can think of at the moment. Maybe I should claim that climate change is responsible.

  2. #252
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    Quote Originally Posted by caryalsobrook View Post
    Let me tell you about where I grew up in W. Tn. 60 years ago, I doubt I even saw a deer there. Hit 2 in the last 11 months with my truck. Damage was $5,000. I almost never fail to see a deer when I go to the farm. Probably could kill one just by sitting outside my camper if I chose. More ducks than I can ever remember. Less than 10 years ago, you never saw a snow goose, now they are there in Lauderdale county alone by the 10's of thousands. Eating all the food the ducks used to eat so the number of ducks will probably decrease. Never saw a Bald Eagle but now see at least 2-3 every duck season. Hawks are always present when I am duck hunting. Doves are plentiful but there is so much food they are scattered and relatively hard to hunt. There are rabbits but the coyotes eat them. Also qual are for the most part non-existant due to the coyotes. When I was young they were plentiful. Never saw or heard of turkey when I was young but now they are there in significant numbers as well as turkey hunters.

    Just a few things I can think of at the moment. Maybe I should claim that climate change is responsible.
    Better blame the armadillos for some of the quail loss. They hunt for eggs of turtle and ground nesting birds. And of course all the cats that people turn loose out in the country. I have found one box turtle in a quail nest however the box turtle had not appeared to be eating the eggs yet when I found it. Armadillos seldom miss a turlte nest buried on our place............every bird dog should have a nose as good as an armadillos nose. And to those who believe that quail nests don't put out any scent............don't believe it.
    charly

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  3. #253
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    Quote Originally Posted by charly_t View Post
    Better blame the armadillos for some of the quail loss. They hunt for eggs of turtle and ground nesting birds. And of course all the cats that people turn loose out in the country. I have found one box turtle in a quail nest however the box turtle had not appeared to be eating the eggs yet when I found it. Armadillos seldom miss a turlte nest buried on our place............every bird dog should have a nose as good as an armadillos nose. And to those who believe that quail nests don't put out any scent............don't believe it.
    I forgot the armadillos and turkey buzzards we also have now. I also did not mention the beaver. My father said that they were brought in the area by Tn. Wildlife but they always denied it. He claimed that there had never been beaver in the area and like all farmers he hated them. When I was young they were protected but the farmers could care less and shot them anyway. I can remember taking dynamite and blowing up dams. When I was in high school, there was a beaver dam that the gov. prevented being destroyed. My father along with some other land owners decided to stop all duck hunting on their farms until it was destroyed. I can remember him telling me, "and you don't hunt down there either". The dam got destroyed. Today there is a bounty on beaver.

  4. #254
    Senior Member zeus3925's Avatar
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    From today's Marketwatch.com website:
    http://www.marketwatch.com/story/the...0?pagenumber=1
    Sarge

    I don't want to feed an ugly dog!

  5. #255
    Senior Member Gerry Clinchy's Avatar
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    Interesting sunspot activity. Lowest it's been in the last century.
    But scientists are watching the sun carefully to see whether cycle 24 is going to be an aberration -- or if this solar calmness is going to stretch through the next cycle as well.


    "We won't know that for another good three or four years," said Biesecker.


    Some researchers speculate this could be the start of a prolonged period of weak solar activity.


    The last time that happened, during the so-called "Maunder Minimum" between 1650 and 1715, almost no sunspots were observed. During the same period, temperatures dropped sharply on Earth, sparking what is called the "Little Ice Age" in Europe and North America.


    As the sunspot numbers continue to stay low, it's possible the Earth's climate is being affected again.
    But thanks to global warming, we're unlikely to see another ice age. "Things have not started to cooling, they just have not risen as quickly," Biesecker said.
    http://news.yahoo.com/calm-solar-cyc...213912384.html
    G.Clinchy@gmail.com
    "Know in your heart that all things are possible. We couldn't conceive of a miracle if none ever happened." -Libby Fudim

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  6. #256
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gerry Clinchy View Post
    Interesting sunspot activity. Lowest it's been in the last century.

    http://news.yahoo.com/calm-solar-cyc...213912384.html
    It's because of global warming...
    Bill Davis

  7. #257
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    U.S. spews 50% more methane than EPA estimate, research indicates

    By Seth Borenstein


    Associated Press


    WASHINGTON — The United States is spewing 50 percent more methane — a potent heat-trapping gas — than the federal government estimates, a scientific study says. Much of it comes from three states: Texas, Oklahoma and Kansas.

    That means methane may be a bigger global warming issue than thought, scientists said. Methane is 21 times more potent at trapping heat than carbon dioxide, the most abundant global warming gas, although it doesn’t stay in the air as long.

    Much of that extra methane, also called natural gas, seems to be coming from livestock, including manure, belches and flatulence, as well as leaks from refining and drilling for oil and gas. The study was published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science.

    The study estimates that in 2008, the U.S. poured 49 million tons of methane into the air. That means U.S. methane emissions trapped about as much heat as all the carbon dioxide pollution coming from cars, trucks and planes in the country in six months.

    That’s more than the 32 million tons estimated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency or the nearly 29 million tons reckoned by the European Commission.

    “Something is very much off in the inventories,” said study co-author Anna Michalak, an Earth scientist at the Carnegie Institution for Science in Stanford, Calif. “The total U.S. impact on the world’s energy budget is different than we thought, and it’s worse.”

    EPA spokeswoman Alisha Johnson said her agency hasn’t had time to go through the study yet.

    Although the world has a good handle on how much carbon dioxide is pumped into the air, scientists have been baffled by methane emissions, using computer models to estimate how much methane is going into that air.

    This study, however, was based on nearly 13,000 measurements from airplane flights and tall towers, the most of any such research.

    The information was collected in 2008. Scientists have yet to analyze data from 2012. Michalak said because of the way they measured methane — just looking for it in the air as opposed to tracking it from a source — it is hard to say what is putting more methane into the air. But she said by looking at concentrations — especially within Texas, Oklahoma and Kansas — the scientists have a good idea: Cows, oil and gas.

    Nearly a fourth of U.S. emissions came from those three states. Texas is by far and away the No. 1 state for refineries that turn oil into gasoline. Texas and Oklahoma are big oil and gas drilling states. Kansas is a big cow state.

    Cows seem to be spewing twice the methane than previously thought, Michalak said.

    While burps and flatulence are part of the methane emission from cattle, University of California Santa Barbara professor Ira Leifer said a bigger factor is manure.

    “If you shovel it into an artificial lagoon you are creating the perfect production for methane,” he said.
    Last edited by Golddogs; 11-26-2013 at 09:12 AM.
    Never trust a dog to watch your food!

  8. #258
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    Quote Originally Posted by Golddogs View Post
    U.S. spews 50% more methane than EPA estimate, research indicates

    By Seth Borenstein


    Associated Press


    WASHINGTON — The United States is spewing 50 percent more methane — a potent heat-trapping gas — than the federal government estimates, a scientific study says. Much of it comes from three states: Texas, Oklahoma and Kansas.

    That means methane may be a bigger global warming issue than thought, scientists said. Methane is 21 times more potent at trapping heat than carbon dioxide, the most abundant global warming gas, although it doesn’t stay in the air as long.

    Much of that extra methane, also called natural gas, seems to be coming from livestock, including manure, belches and flatulence, as well as leaks from refining and drilling for oil and gas. The study was published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science.

    The study estimates that in 2008, the U.S. poured 49 million tons of methane into the air. That means U.S. methane emissions trapped about as much heat as all the carbon dioxide pollution coming from cars, trucks and planes in the country in six months.

    That’s more than the 32 million tons estimated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency or the nearly 29 million tons reckoned by the European Commission.

    “Something is very much off in the inventories,” said study co-author Anna Michalak, an Earth scientist at the Carnegie Institution for Science in Stanford, Calif. “The total U.S. impact on the world’s energy budget is different than we thought, and it’s worse.”

    EPA spokeswoman Alisha Johnson said her agency hasn’t had time to go through the study yet.

    Although the world has a good handle on how much carbon dioxide is pumped into the air, scientists have been baffled by methane emissions, using computer models to estimate how much methane is going into that air.

    This study, however, was based on nearly 13,000 measurements from airplane flights and tall towers, the most of any such research.

    The information was collected in 2008. Scientists have yet to analyze data from 2012. Michalak said because of the way they measured methane — just looking for it in the air as opposed to tracking it from a source — it is hard to say what is putting more methane into the air. But she said by looking at concentrations — especially within Texas, Oklahoma and Kansas — the scientists have a good idea: Cows, oil and gas.

    Nearly a fourth of U.S. emissions came from those three states. Texas is by far and away the No. 1 state for refineries that turn oil into gasoline. Texas and Oklahoma are big oil and gas drilling states. Kansas is a big cow state.

    Cows seem to be spewing twice the methane than previously thought, Michalak said.

    While burps and flatulence are part of the methane emission from cattle, University of California Santa Barbara professor Ira Leifer said a bigger factor is manure.

    “If you shovel it into an artificial lagoon you are creating the perfect production for methane,” he said.


    Please, don't confuse us with facts. It makes us work extra hard to justify what we 'know' and how we 'feel' that science is wrong about this. I've got headache regards-Paul
    there's no good reason to fatten up a retriever.

  9. #259
    Senior Member Gerry Clinchy's Avatar
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    Interesting sunspot activity. Lowest it's been in the last century.
    But scientists are watching the sun carefully to see whether cycle 24 is going to be an aberration -- or if this solar calmness is going to stretch through the next cycle as well.


    "We won't know that for another good three or four years," said Biesecker.


    Some researchers speculate this could be the start of a prolonged period of weak solar activity.


    The last time that happened, during the so-called "Maunder Minimum" between 1650 and 1715, almost no sunspots were observed. During the same period, temperatures dropped sharply on Earth, sparking what is called the "Little Ice Age" in Europe and North America.


    As the sunspot numbers continue to stay low, it's possible the Earth's climate is being affected again.
    But thanks to global warming, we're unlikely to see another ice age. "Things have not started to cooling, they just have not risen as quickly," Biesecker said.
    http://news.yahoo.com/calm-solar-cyc...213912384.html
    G.Clinchy@gmail.com
    "Know in your heart that all things are possible. We couldn't conceive of a miracle if none ever happened." -Libby Fudim

    ​I don't use the PM feature, so just email me direct at the address shown above.

  10. #260
    Senior Member Gerry Clinchy's Avatar
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    Although the climate models did not anticipate the present cooling trend, whether you believe in their scientific accuracy or not, you will pay for it ...
    http://cnsnews.com/news/article/barb...nal-carbon-tax
    One problem: there hasn’t been any CO2-driven global warming in 17 years. And the current “pause” may extend another 20 years, according to a paper Curry published a in September with Dr. Marcia Wyatt in the peer-reviewed journal Climate Dynamics.
    Their research identified a natural 300-year-old climate “stadium wave” cycle that explains why 138 computer models all failed to predict that the Earth’s temperature would remain flat since 1996. (See Curry, Wyatt paper.pdf)
    “The growing divergence between climate model simulations and observations raises the prospect that climate models are inadequate in fundamental ways,” Curry said. But these are the same models that Shelanski refers to as “the best available science.”
    - See more at: http://cnsnews.com/news/article/barb....BKbzMLCF.dpuf

    (I tried to paste a portion of the article, but it wouldn't work)

    Basically, the EPA will deduct from environmental costs of regulations the amount of the Social Carbon Costs.
    One problem: there hasn’t been any CO2-driven global warming in 17 years. And the current “pause” may extend another 20 years, according to a paper Curry published a in September with Dr. Marcia Wyatt in the peer-reviewed journal Climate Dynamics.
    Their research identified a natural 300-year-old climate “stadium wave” cycle that explains why 138 computer models all failed to predict that the Earth’s temperature would remain flat since 1996. (See Curry, Wyatt paper.pdf)
    “The growing divergence between climate model simulations and observations raises the prospect that climate models are inadequate in fundamental ways,” Curry said. But these are the same models that Shelanski refers to as “the best available science.”
    - See more at: http://cnsnews.com/news/article/barb....BKbzMLCF.dpuf
    G.Clinchy@gmail.com
    "Know in your heart that all things are possible. We couldn't conceive of a miracle if none ever happened." -Libby Fudim

    ​I don't use the PM feature, so just email me direct at the address shown above.

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