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Thread: Speaking of Global Warming

  1. #391
    Senior Member JDogger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by huntinman View Post
    I can give them the number one reason without doing a study.... It's COLDER OUTSIDE!!!!!
    It's called weather Bill, and it happens. Might be cold where you are and warm someplace else. 70 degrees here today and getting warmer the next few days. Two years ago the same week we were -0. Is it climate change? I don't know.
    When it is 90 and 90 in June in TN and you can only train at dawn and dusk you can comment again...
    Me...? I can drive in the summer when it is 100 in the valley to the high country where it is only in the 80's and mostly dry. JD
    One cannot reason someone out of something they were not reasoned into. - Jonathan Swift

  2. #392
    Senior Member huntinman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JDogger View Post
    It's called weather Bill, and it happens. Might be cold where you are and warm someplace else. 70 degrees here today and getting warmer the next few days. Two years ago the same week we were -0. Is it climate change? I don't know.
    When it is 90 and 90 in June in TN and you can only train at dawn and dusk you can comment again...
    Me...? I can drive in the summer when it is 100 in the valley to the high country where it is only in the 80's and mostly dry. JD
    EXACTLY... That's why the whole CLIMATE CHANGE movement is so much tripe.
    Bill Davis

  3. #393
    Senior Member JDogger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by huntinman View Post
    EXACTLY... That's why the whole CLIMATE CHANGE movement is so much tripe.
    Ah....Tripe... we call it menudo. A little red chile, some oregano, it's a hardy bowl, served mostly on wednesday's. Your cold, my hot, might just be weather, but weather extremes do seem to be occuring. Que no ???

    Climate change may well be just a menu item regards, JD
    Last edited by JDogger; 02-13-2014 at 10:17 PM.
    One cannot reason someone out of something they were not reasoned into. - Jonathan Swift

  4. #394
    Senior Member huntinman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JDogger View Post
    Ah....Tripe... we call it menudo. A little red chile, some oregano, it's a hardy bowl, served mostly on wednesday's. Your cold, my hot, might just be weather, but weather extremes do seem to be occuring. Que no ???

    Climate change may well be just a menu item regards, JD
    Eat all you want...
    Bill Davis

  5. #395
    Senior Member HuntClub's Avatar
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    It's like taking a tablespoon of water from the Mississippi river, analyzing it and building a predictive model based on that tablespoon. Just the fact that model predictions are constantly being modified or completely wrong leads me to believe the data and research that's being sold as gospel, is just grasping at straws. Is there something changing in the climate? Maybe, maybe not. The problem is, I don't think anybody can tell with any certainty and even if they could we would be stuck the results. I've said this before, nobody is prepared to do what it would take curb a severe problem if it did exist.

  6. #396
    Senior Member starjack's Avatar
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    Let see Here in wis. its cold and snow in Feb. But in July is hot. Nope no climate change here

  7. #397
    Senior Member road kill's Avatar
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    More facts that dispute the settled science!


    The Great Lakes are almost completely covered with ice
    Feb 14th 2014 4:55PM
    13797242



    CHEBOYGAN, Mich. (AP) - From the bridge of the Coast Guard cutter Mackinaw, northern Lake Huron looks like a vast, snow-covered field dotted with ice slabs as big as boulders - a battleground for the icebreaker's 58-member crew during one of the roughest winters in memory.
    It's been so bitterly cold for so long in the Upper Midwest that the Great Lakes are almost completely covered with ice. The last time they came this close was in 1994, when 94 percent of the lakes' surface was frozen.
    As of Friday, ice cover extended across 88 percent, according to the federal government's Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory in Ann Arbor.
    Sections of the lakes, which hold nearly one-fifth of the freshwater on the world's surface, harden almost every winter. That freezing keeps the Coast Guard's fleet of nine icebreakers busy clearing paths for vessels hauling essential cargo such as heating oil, salt and coal. But over the past four decades, the average ice cover has receded 70 percent, scientists say, probably in part because of climate change.
    Still, as this season shows, short-term weather patterns can trump multi-year trends. Winter arrived early and with a vengeance and refuses to loosen its grip.
    "That arctic vortex came down, and the ice just kept going," said George Leshkevich, a physical scientist with the federal lab.


    The deep freeze is more than a novelty. By limiting evaporation, it may help replenish lake water levels - a process that began last year after a record-breaking slump dating to the late 1990s. Also getting relief are cities along the lakes that have been pummeled with lake-effect snow, which happens when cold air masses suck up moisture from open waters and dump it over land.
    Buffalo, N.Y, got nearly 43 inches of snow in January, but this month just 13 inches have fallen, a decline resulting largely from the freeze-over of Lake Erie even though Lake Ontario has remained largely open, said forecaster Jon Hitchcock of the National Weather Service.
    Heavy ice can also protect fish eggs from predators, and it has delighted photographers, ice anglers and daredevil snowmobilers.
    At Apostle Islands National Lakeshore in Wisconsin, the rock-solid cover has allowed around 35,000 visitors to trudge miles over Lake Superior to explore caves featuring dazzling ice formations. It's the first time in five years the lake surface has been firm enough to allow passage.
    With no letup in the cold, the ice hasn't experienced the usual thaw-and-freeze cycle, so nature's artistry is even more delicate and beautiful, with needle-like hoarfrost crystals sprinkled across sheets that dangle from cave ceilings like giant chandeliers.
    "Seeing them like this is almost a once-in-a-lifetime experience," Superintendent Bob Krumenaker said.
    There's even an (apparently) tongue-in-cheek Facebook page inviting people to join a convoy of snowmobiles, cars and other vehicles on a nearly 80-mile trek across Lake Michigan. Never mind that its waters remain partly open and experts warn the ice can be dangerously unstable.
    "If it freezes, and you miss this chance, when will it happen again?" the page says. "Feel free to invite more folks!"
    For Coast Guard icebreaker teams, it's all business. They've logged four times more hours this season than the average for the same period in recent years, said Kyle Niemi, spokesman for the agency's Cleveland district headquarters.
    The 240-foot-long Mackinaw began its duties Dec. 16 - several weeks earlier than usual - and worked nonstop until Feb. 8, when traffic slowed enough to allow a break.
    "As you can imagine, the crew's tired," Cmdr. Michael Davanzo said this week during a tour of the ship in its home port of Cheboygan.
    A 35-year Coast Guard veteran who has spent 12 years on the lakes, Davanzo said this winter is the toughest he's experienced because the ice came so soon and is so thick and widespread, and the weather has been constantly bitter.
    The Mackinaw, commissioned in 2006 to replace an older vessel with the same name, is designed specifically for duty on the Great Lakes. It's propelled by two "Azipod" thrusters that can spin 360 degrees and fire jets of water at adjacent ice, weakening it. Sometimes the crew will drive the ship's bow onto an ice sheet to crack it with sheer weight. Or they'll go backward, chopping up ice with the propeller blades.
    When the going gets tough, there's the battering-ram option - hurling the reinforced hull directly against walls of ice that can be several feet thick.
    The workload typically drops sharply after navigational locks on the St. Marys River, the link between Lakes Superior and Huron, close in mid-January and most large cargo haulers dock for winter. But the ice was so thick this year that a number of freighters were still struggling to complete final deliveries days later. Even now, demand for road salt and heating oil in the Midwest is keeping some icebreakers busy.
    One day last month, the Mackinaw spent 16 grueling hours helping a freighter squeeze through a narrow 3.5-mile section of the St. Marys. As the Mackinaw attacks the ice, the engines roar and the ship vibrates. The noise and motion are "like living in an earthquake 16 hours a day," Petty Officer 3rd Class Ryan Alderman said.
    Davanzo hopes for rain and warmer temperatures that would melt some ice before the locks reopen in late March, when the Mackinaw will venture onto Lake Superior and clear paths for iron ore and coal haulers.
    "But if the weather stays like this," he said, "we could be breaking ice all the way to the middle of May."
    Despite the inconvenience, there's a silver lining for shippers. Since the low-water period began in late 1990s, they've been forced to carry lighter loads to avoid scraping bottom in shallow channels and harbors. Heavy snow and rain in 2013 finally raised water levels.
    Ice cover blocks evaporation, the leading cause of low water. It also will keep the lakes cooler for a longer time this year, delaying the onset of heavy evaporation season, scientist John Lenters reported in a paper last month, although the benefit is partially offset by stepped-up evaporation shortly before the ice forms.
    In Lake Superior, snowbound Isle Royale National Park is home to a dwindling and inbred wolf population that is usually trapped on the island. Biologists hope a newcomer or two will venture to the park now that the lake is almost entirely frozen over. The park's first wolves are believed to have crossed an ice bridge from Canada, 15 miles away, in the late 1940s.
    There's also a chance that one or more of the island's wolves could grab the rare opportunity to escape.
    "They are inveterate travelers," veteran wolf expert Rolf Peterson said. "And they don't need a reason that would make sense to us."

  8. #398
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    Obama proposes $1 billion climate fund

    By Zachary A. Goldfarb and Lenny Bernstein


    Washington Post


    FRESNO, Calif. — President Barack Obama said here Friday that he will propose a $1 billion fund in his fiscal 2015 budget to help communities prepare for the effects of climate change and to fund research and technology to protect against its impact.

    The president announced the “climate resilience fund” during a meeting with farmers and ranchers in Fresno, Calif., who have been severely affected by a drought in the state’s San Joaquin Valley.

    As of Tuesday, 91.6 percent of the state was experiencing severe or exceptional drought.

    Obama is expected to release his proposed 2015 budget in early March.

    The prospects for the climate fund are uncertain in a Republican-controlled House. But Obama, who made preparation for climate change one of the major themes of the climate action plan he released in June, will continue to press for the need to adapt, according to the White House.

    Obama also announced a series of near-term measures to help Western farmers and ranchers recover from the drought, which is now in its third year.

    They include $100 million in livestock disaster assistance for California feed producers, $60 million for food banks to help California families affected by the water shortage and $15 million in conservation assistance for Texas, Oklahoma, Nebraska, Colorado and New Mexico, as well as California.

    Cities across the country are formulating and, in some cases, enacting their own plans to protect against rising water, increased temperatures and more frequent severe weather. New York City, for example, last year announced a $19.5 billion plan to protect its 520 miles of shoreline against rising sea waters, and the Gulf Coast of Louisiana released a $50 billion plan in 2012.

    Obama would spend the $1 billion to “better understand the projected impacts of climate change,” encourage local action to reduce future risk, and fund technology and infrastructure that will be more resilient to climate change, according to briefing documents released by the White House.

    Paul Bledsoe, senior fellow on energy and society at the German Marshall Fund of the United States, said that Democrats and Republicans in Congress “don’t have to agree” on whether the combustion of fossil fuels is causing climate change. “ We just need to agree we have a problem that must be dealt with,” said Bledsoe, who was an Interior Department official under President Bill Clinton.
    Never trust a dog to watch your food!

  9. #399
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    R K,
    thanks for the interesting weather report.

    here is one from Russia this winter. http://m.rbth.ru/society/2014/01/15/...ing_33275.html
    Last edited by Henry V; 02-15-2014 at 12:42 PM.

  10. #400
    Senior Member huntinman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Henry V View Post
    R K,
    thanks for the interesting weather report.

    here is one from Russia this winter. http://m.rbth.ru/society/2014/01/15/...ing_33275.html
    It happens... That's life. Next year, they'll probably freeze their buns off.
    Bill Davis

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