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Thread: Crate training for the impossible puppy - getting my donkey kicked right now, folks

  1. #1
    Senior Member PennyRetrievers's Avatar
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    Default Crate training for the impossible puppy - getting my donkey kicked right now, folks

    Ok friends,
    Just picked up a new pup on Sunday. This is the fourth dog I've had at around this age, and the fourth that I've had to do crate training with - but this little guy is giving me fits.

    He's in a box in the garage, and sees regular contact from myself, my wife, or one of the kids. We've been getting him out about every 2 hours, plus those times when we seem to hear him yelping. The poor guy just can't seem to get the concept that he's supposed to be crapping outside and not in his box.

    I've tried shrinking the size of his kennel by putting a large milk crate in the back of it. I'm taking him out after feedings. I've tried running with him in the back yard to increase the urge to go. When he goes out, we stay in the yard until he makes a deposit - but usually he'll take 20 minutes before he decides he needs to go. When he goes in the kennel, it gets cleaned and disinfected scupulously so that no odor of mess lingers.

    The last pup had a few accidents, but generally seemed to get the concept after a few days. But this little guy is making want to pull my hair out.

    Any veterans out there with some sort of unconventioal tips? HELP!!

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    Senior Member roseberry's Avatar
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    with a pup at this age if the doo is dark and runny make sure to not let him get dehydrated and take him to vet. it could be (cock-sid-ee-uh).

    if not dark and runny take your time and be patient and put a good towel in too. in my experience males can be a little more tolerant of the circumstances they create and for a little longer. i see you can't pm yet but if you want to share the breeding we could investigate common past ancestors and doo-doo traits!
    john mccallie

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    Senior Member PennyRetrievers's Avatar
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    Turds have been totally normal. And he's on the same food his breeder started him on - I'm at work and can't remember exactly what it is right now, but I'm pretty sure it's a Purina product.

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    Senior Member M&K's Retrievers's Avatar
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    Sometimes a change in water will upset their stomach for a day or two.
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    Senior Member Rainmaker's Avatar
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    I would keep him in the house vs the garage, spend more time with him and get him bonded and settled in more before separating him so much from you. He sounds stressed. Also might have something going on gut-wise and he can't control the going, which would be compounded by stress. If he's in the house, you can monitor him closer and get him out when he has to go, start helping him make that connection vs letting him soil his crate then taking him out. If you're putting him back in right after he goes, then you're also teaching him as soon as he goes, playtime outside is over. Let him run around for a while after he goes, if you aren't already. If you are letting him out when you hear him yelping, you're teaching him to vocalize to get out. You need to be able to see him to judge when he needs out, before the accident happens, and to teach him quiet when you know he doesn't have to go, and needs to learn to settle. All puppies are different, some take longer to adjust to their new homes and being in a crate alone, this one maybe is going to make you work harder to help him adjust. Might also try an xpen in the house so he can be contained and around you guys more but not necessarily crated. Build into longer periods of crating as he gets more confident and physically able to control himself, assuming he doesn't have stool issues caused by something else. It's a fine line sometimes to walk, between caving into a drama queen and realizing a pup needs more than what he's currently getting to help him settle into his new home.
    Kim Pfister, Rainmaker Labs

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    Senior Member PennyRetrievers's Avatar
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    Solid advice.

    Quote Originally Posted by Rainmaker View Post
    It's a fine line sometimes to walk, between caving into a drama queen and realizing a pup needs more than what he's currently getting to help him settle into his new home.
    Truth.

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    Senior Member Novemberwitch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rainmaker View Post
    I would keep him in the house vs the garage, spend more time with him and get him bonded and settled in more before separating him so much from you. He sounds stressed. Also might have something going on gut-wise and he can't control the going, which would be compounded by stress. If he's in the house, you can monitor him closer and get him out when he has to go, start helping him make that connection vs letting him soil his crate then taking him out. If you're putting him back in right after he goes, then you're also teaching him as soon as he goes, playtime outside is over. Let him run around for a while after he goes, if you aren't already. If you are letting him out when you hear him yelping, you're teaching him to vocalize to get out. You need to be able to see him to judge when he needs out, before the accident happens, and to teach him quiet when you know he doesn't have to go, and needs to learn to settle. All puppies are different, some take longer to adjust to their new homes and being in a crate alone, this one maybe is going to make you work harder to help him adjust. Might also try an xpen in the house so he can be contained and around you guys more but not necessarily crated. Build into longer periods of crating as he gets more confident and physically able to control himself, assuming he doesn't have stool issues caused by something else. It's a fine line sometimes to walk, between caving into a drama queen and realizing a pup needs more than what he's currently getting to help him settle into his new home.

    Great Post!!
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    Rainmaker - solid advice!

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    Senior Member Rhenee Fadling's Avatar
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    Great advice from Rainmaker, but what is this pups feeding schedule and how much is the pup fed? Overfeeding and free - feeding, in my opinion, equal too much and hard to regulate pooping. Accidents happen, but I would check the bag of food for amounts, I personally cut what's posted by 15%, get on a feeding schedule -feeding several hours before bed, we feed three times a day until 10-12 weeks and then go to twice a day, picking up any uneatten food after 15 minutes. Set up your schedule so the pup can air for awhile afterwards and have opportunities to air before going down for the night. Water the same thing, pick up water a couple of hours before bed, unless the pup has had a lot of activity and needs a drink.

    It will get better as the pup gets more physically developed! As you're experiencing, as we've all experienced, pups are different, some are easier to get over this hump than others - patience friend!
    Last edited by Rhenee Fadling; 05-03-2013 at 08:30 AM.
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    Senior Member yellow machine's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rainmaker View Post
    I would keep him in the house vs the garage, spend more time with him and get him bonded and settled in more before separating him so much from you. He sounds stressed. Also might have something going on gut-wise and he can't control the going, which would be compounded by stress. If he's in the house, you can monitor him closer and get him out when he has to go, start helping him make that connection vs letting him soil his crate then taking him out. If you're putting him back in right after he goes, then you're also teaching him as soon as he goes, playtime outside is over. Let him run around for a while after he goes, if you aren't already. If you are letting him out when you hear him yelping, you're teaching him to vocalize to get out. You need to be able to see him to judge when he needs out, before the accident happens, and to teach him quiet when you know he doesn't have to go, and needs to learn to settle. All puppies are different, some take longer to adjust to their new homes and being in a crate alone, this one maybe is going to make you work harder to help him adjust. Might also try an xpen in the house so he can be contained and around you guys more but not necessarily crated. Build into longer periods of crating as he gets more confident and physically able to control himself, assuming he doesn't have stool issues caused by something else. It's a fine line sometimes to walk, between caving into a drama queen and realizing a pup needs more than what he's currently getting to help him settle into his new home.
    Yes Yes Yes follow this advice or you could develop a dog with separation anxiety!
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