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Thread: Hunting a 10 month old pup?

  1. #21
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    I did hunted my pup at 8 months old and he retrived ducks and some were cripples but he picked up a lot of bad habbits
    One being not steady dnt think i wld do it that way again its very hard trying to steady him now just my thghts

  2. #22
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    I would never hunt a young dog on doves. Too many things can go wrong and out of your control. One thing I've noticed, is even older dogs aren't crazy about picking them up, especially when they (the dog) are hot and panting.

    Hunt a young dog on ducks? You bet and make sure the dog is in a place where they can see the birds and watch the action. Very important to maintain your training standards and don't be afraid to do the walk of shame back to the truck to put Fido up if he becomes uncontrolable or a distraction in the blind.

    Below is a pic of Glenhoma's El Chupacabra "Chupa" @ 8 months with a 5 man limit. He would later win his first derby @ 16 months and become QAA @ 25 months. We had to work like hell to put the control back into him after hunting him at such an early age but man did we have fun for 3 months. Thinking back on it I wouldn't change a thing.



    All the best!

    RD
    Official Launcher of the 2005, 2006,2007,2008,2009 & 2010 HRC Fall & Spring Grand!

  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by BonMallari View Post
    I see this question asked every season at least half a dozen times from first timers with a young pup who is a "tweener"...OP gets good advice from people who have been there in the same situation, and then OP tries to justify that their dove hunt will be different because they are going to put the gun down and just hunt....

    To the OP, dove hunting can be fast and furious or dove hunting can be boringly slow...both extremes are very hard on a young dog in the Sept heat...everyone wants to hunt, after all its why you probably got a dog..If you decide to hunt your dog you take a real chance of undoing any training you may have already done, and if you have never even killed a fresh pigeon over the dog you are asking for problems down the road

    Hunt the dog..dont hunt the dog..the choice is yours, just give your dog the best chance to succeed and have a long career afield

    bring lots of cool fresh water for your dog both for inside of the dog and his outside too

    I understand the points everyone is saying not to hunt him. I don't see how it can be much different than the training except I won't have to buy the birds. We have started having him retriever shot flying pigeons that were shot right over him and having good success on land and water. I plan on taking out him on a couple nice afternoon/evening hunts and just having him heel and look for a few hours and hopefully see a live bird come in shot and retrieved.

    I have never really thought about the feathers and smallness of the doves. I won't be able to go opeining day but will have family than can give more some birds to show him and have him retrieve em.

    Hows the best way to teach the dog to sit next to you and 'hunt'? I have been practicing it with him by having him just stay at heel for lenghts of time. I think by taking him out to 'hunt' an hour or two once or twice a week will hunt him learn how to hunt. With hopefully some associated reward like a live bird shot.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by straightsix View Post
    I don't see how it can be much different than the training except I won't have to buy the birds. We have started having him retriever shot flying pigeons that were shot right over him and having good success on land and water. I plan on taking out him on a couple nice afternoon/evening hunts and just having him heel and look for a few hours and hopefully see a live bird come in shot and retrieved.

    I have never really thought about the feathers and smallness of the doves. I won't be able to go opeining day but will have family than can give more some birds to show him and have him retrieve em.

    Hows the best way to teach the dog to sit next to you and 'hunt'? I have been practicing it with him by having him just stay at heel for lenghts of time. I think by taking him out to 'hunt' an hour or two once or twice a week will hunt him learn how to hunt. With hopefully some associated reward like a live bird shot.
    It's your dog, so do what you think is best. That said, unless you have an exceptional dog, you will quickly find out that there is a LOT of difference between hunting and training. Primarily, you don't have full control of the hunting scenario like you do in training. You probably won't do anything worse than train in some habits that you have to spend time training out later, but the question is are you willing to take that chance for a couple dove hunts early in the dog's career vs. waiting until the dog is really ready to hunt. Ask me how I know.

    Another word to the wise: a dove will slide down a good-sized Lab's throat with a quickness. Be ready to get out there and pull a couple out by the feet, particularly if all you have worked with are larger birds like ducks.

    Be sure and keep the dog cool. Where I live it's not uncommon for temps to be well into the 90s for dove hunts, and the added excitement and bird feathers do not help that any. Ice and/or frozen water bottles are probably a good idea.

    Good luck with your pup.
    Steve Wyatt

    HR Belle's Rolling Big Rig "Jimmy"

  5. #25
    Senior Member BlaineT's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by straightsix View Post
    I understand the points everyone is saying not to hunt him. I don't see how it can be much different than the training except I won't have to buy the birds. We have started having him retriever shot flying pigeons that were shot right over him and having good success on land and water. I plan on taking out him on a couple nice afternoon/evening hunts and just having him heel and look for a few hours and hopefully see a live bird come in shot and retrieved.

    I have never really thought about the feathers and smallness of the doves. I won't be able to go opeining day but will have family than can give more some birds to show him and have him retrieve em.

    Hows the best way to teach the dog to sit next to you and 'hunt'? I have been practicing it with him by having him just stay at heel for lenghts of time. I think by taking him out to 'hunt' an hour or two once or twice a week will hunt him learn how to hunt. With hopefully some associated reward like a live bird shot.
    not trying to be a jerk or anything but were you looking for people to give you good sound advice from experience on this or just affirmation that you should take your puppy hunting? Because the vast majority have said- wait.

    Your first part of this post screams to me- you and the dog need a little more work, when you said, "I dont see how it could be much different than training...."

    that's not a slam on you, just saying to not rush it. You've got a decade or more of great times in the field with your dog, why risk any of the things that some have warned you about to take him hunting one season early.

  6. #26
    Senior Member BonMallari's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by straightsix View Post
    I understand the points everyone is saying not to hunt him. I don't see how it can be much different than the training except I won't have to buy the birds. We have started having him retriever shot flying pigeons that were shot right over him and having good success on land and water. I plan on taking out him on a couple nice afternoon/evening hunts and just having him heel and look for a few hours and hopefully see a live bird come in shot and retrieved.

    I have never really thought about the feathers and smallness of the doves. I won't be able to go opeining day but will have family than can give more some birds to show him and have him retrieve em.

    Hows the best way to teach the dog to sit next to you and 'hunt'? I have been practicing it with him by having him just stay at heel for lenghts of time. I think by taking him out to 'hunt' an hour or two once or twice a week will hunt him learn how to hunt. With hopefully some associated reward like a live bird shot.

    that may not be the best idea, even though they have good intentions, they may not hold the dog to the standards you want, what are they going to do when they click that safety and stand up to shoot and WHAM your dog takes off expecting a dove to drop

    the best way to teach a dog to hunt....hunt the dog...teach the dog that you may not see a bird in the sky...some of best hunts with Mirk have been when it was so slow that he just laid his head in my lap and let me scratch his head and feed him snacks...the time a dog spends in the field is part of the learning experience, he doesnt need to be sitting at heel ready to explode the whole time, let him relax, but when its GO time then its on..
    All my Exes live in Texas

    Quote Originally Posted by lanse brown View Post
    A few things that I learned still ring true. "Lanse when you get a gift, say thank you and walk away. When you get a screwing walk away. You are going to get a lot more screwings than gifts"

  7. #27
    Senior Member afdahl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlaineT View Post
    You've got a decade or more of great times in the field with your dog, why risk any of the things that some have warned you about to take him hunting one season early.
    There you have it in one sentence.

    I usually advise people to skip dove hunting the first year, and to use caution duck hunting. Something I haven't seen anyone else mention is that young dogs lack the resistance to cold more mature dogs have--so it's important to pay attention to temperature, wind, and your puppy's comfort. You don't want him to be miserable.

    It's obviously very tempting to take your new retriever out for doves, having worked on his training for several months. Those of my training customers who have done this against my advice have told me they regretted it. In addition to the confusion of other shooters and dogs in the field:

    Doves tend to promote bad bird handling (playing with, eating), while ducks tend to promote good bird handling (if not shot-up). Which do you think would be better training for an inexperienced dog?

    Missed shots, resulting in no retrieve, can confuse a dog and make him stop paying attention to the gun.

    Doves on the ground are often hard to find, especially for inexperienced dogs. Do you want to risk teaching him, "you won't find it--give up now!"?

    Amy Dahl

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by afdahl View Post
    There you have it in one sentence.

    I usually advise people to skip dove hunting the first year, and to use caution duck hunting. Something I haven't seen anyone else mention is that young dogs lack the resistance to cold more mature dogs have--so it's important to pay attention to temperature, wind, and your puppy's comfort. You don't want him to be miserable.

    It's obviously very tempting to take your new retriever out for doves, having worked on his training for several months. Those of my training customers who have done this against my advice have told me they regretted it. In addition to the confusion of other shooters and dogs in the field:

    Doves tend to promote bad bird handling (playing with, eating), while ducks tend to promote good bird handling (if not shot-up). Which do you think would be better training for an inexperienced dog?

    Missed shots, resulting in no retrieve, can confuse a dog and make him stop paying attention to the gun.

    Doves on the ground are often hard to find, especially for inexperienced dogs. Do you want to risk teaching him, "you won't find it--give up now!"?

    Amy Dahl
    You bring up a lot of good points about the doves. We have an early Teal season that starts the same time, maybe I should focus my efforts that way. If I sit him out till regular duck season he would be just under 1 yr.

  9. #29
    Senior Member blackasmollases's Avatar
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    I've got to agree with BlaineT. I've got a pup who is 14mos. old now an never been on a hunt yet. You have the best years of their lives ahead of you why push it? It has been tough not taking him but I am positive it will pay off. In the end you have final call .
    Black as mollases, call name Strap

    Sire: Fc Afc Land ahoy "PIRATE"

    Dam: Ten bears little bit "BUTTON"

  10. #30
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    Here is a side question for young pups going hunting for the first time. Would you have them wear their e-collar? or leave them without and just keep them on a short lead? Can you please explain any reasons you have for either wearing e-collar or not?

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