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Thread: GDG Way Off topic. Foundation and water.

  1. #1
    Senior Member MooseGooser's Avatar
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    Default GDG Way Off topic. Foundation and water.

    WOW!

    Our neighbors have had problems in the past with water in their basement. They put a sump pump in, but the silly thing runs pretty much constantly.

    The slab is cracked bad in some spots.

    They decided to have it all redone. The old slab removed, and perimeter drains installed.

    The work crew that is doing the concrete work, removed the old slab, and the plan was to remove 12 inchs of dirt under the old slab, fill that area back in with a good base, then repour the new slab. They also discovered that becuae of the ground heaving in the past,,the main drain was broken and split in two.

    What hashappened now, as they have dug down the extra foot, there is water seeping up and this morning , there is 1" of new water standing in the dirt..

    You guys that work concrete,, have you ever encountered this?

    Who would you call to find out where the natural water table depth is?

    The concrete forman says he has never seen this, and HIS paln is to fill most all of the area with 1" rock, then follow that with the new base..
    It is far easier to spit on the work of others than it is to produce something better yourself.
    Brynmoors Prairie Sage JH ​(Sage) Just a dang fool huntin Dawg
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    I have gone by "Gooser" since I was a "gossling"

  2. #2
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    If you guys are on septic systems, the plan for their system should indicate the high groundwater level. If they don't have the plan (or it's old and they don't have it on the plan) a soil evaluator should be able to estimate it from a test pit, or they could check with board of health or whatever agency regulates septics in your area, they might have some records. Also could check with soil conservation service or state soil mapping, may be able to tell you based on soils type. If high water is a couple of feet or more above the floor not much you can do but lots of stone under and around the slab, pipe to a deep sump and pump it as far away from the house as he can. (See lots of people whose sump pumps discharge a foot from the foundation - just end up pumping in circles.

    Good luck

  3. #3
    Senior Member PalouseDogs's Avatar
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    Did they build their house on top of a spring? No advice except maybe talk to a hydrologist. Maybe they could tap the source of the water and use it to fill a holding tank. But I'm guessing they live in a suburban neighborhood and don't need a source of irrigation water. Sounds like a real expensive problem.
    Kelly Cassidy (person)

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  4. #4
    Senior Member FOM's Avatar
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    Maybe they should just let the basement flood and you would have a nice training pond to use! hehehehehe
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  5. #5
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    You say the main drain is is damaged but the water is still draining into the sump pit? Assuming the broken main line is not the problem and the lot is relatively flat and a pump is necessary to discharge the water to grade, they have either encountered the high end of the water table or they have water moving through the area of their foundation (spring, perched water or old field tile, etc.). My recommendation would be to install two deep sump pits, install a high quality pump in each and use a battery back up system.

    The undercutting of the material below the slab and new granular base will aid in eliminating settlement of the slab due to any soft spots that have developed and/or bridging over deeper bad areas of soil but will do nothing to eliminate the water issue.

    May also consider discharging the sump pumps way beyond the area of the foundation (hard pipe to lower elevation) to minimize the likelihood of the water running back into the foundation.

    Also make sure that the heaving is not due to an expansive soil issue which will only get worse as you expose more virgin soil. You can google "soil engineer" or "soil testing" to find a local resource.
    Last edited by RetrieverNation; 06-07-2013 at 11:31 AM.
    Erik B.

  6. #6
    Senior Member MooseGooser's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RetrieverNation View Post
    You say the main drain is is damaged but the water is still draining into the sump pit? Assuming the broken main line is not the problem and the lot is relatively flat and a pump is necessary to discharge the water to grade, they have either encountered the high end of the water table or they have water moving through the area of their foundation (spring, perched water or old field tile, etc.). My recommendation would be to install two deep sump pits, install a high quality pump in each and use a battery back up system.

    The undercutting of the material below the slab and new granular base will aid in eliminating settlement of the slab due to any soft spots that have developed and/or bridging over deeper bad areas of soil but will do nothing to eliminate the water issue.

    May also consider discharging the sump pumps way beyond the area of the foundation (hard pipe to lower elevation) to minimize the likelihood of the water running back into the foundation.

    Also make sure that the heaving is not due to an expansive soil issue which will only get worse as you expose more virgin soil. You can google "soil engineer" or "soil testing" to find a local resource.
    This is basically what they have decided to do.

    An "engineer" came out with maps and such, and said water table is way deeper in this area.. He felt a spring, or possible a broken storm drain from areas above where his,and MINE sit..

    A soil engineer also came out and siad area is known to have severe problems with bentenite(sp) expansive soil.

    Thy are going to remove old rusted broken main drain, cap it off,and replace that drain with a new one that wont be burried under the new slab.

    New "french drains" around perimeter, and One across the middle, leading to drains that will direct water to sump pumps (heavy duty, battery back up, commercial grade).
    Those sump pumps will direct water through drains to a central cistern well away from the house, that will also have a pump in it to divert water to a rock drain to guide water off the property..


    They are going to add rock and then heavily compact the subbase, top that with old road bed,, compact that, then pour a new slab.

    Pricy,, I'm glad its not us!
    We are in suburbia.... this is not rural property.

    Thanks all..
    It is far easier to spit on the work of others than it is to produce something better yourself.
    Brynmoors Prairie Sage JH ​(Sage) Just a dang fool huntin Dawg
    HRCH Calypso Seven Bales High SH (Bailey)
    HR Calypso Zoomin Loosies Mad Hader (Maddi) We loved you baby. R.I.P.
    FlatLanders Broken Pistol Ricochet SH (Flinch)


    My Christian Name is Michael Baker..
    I have gone by "Gooser" since I was a "gossling"

  7. #7
    Senior Member Socks's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RetrieverNation View Post
    You say the main drain is is damaged but the water is still draining into the sump pit? Assuming the broken main line is not the problem and the lot is relatively flat and a pump is necessary to discharge the water to grade, they have either encountered the high end of the water table or they have water moving through the area of their foundation (spring, perched water or old field tile, etc.). My recommendation would be to install two deep sump pits, install a high quality pump in each and use a battery back up system.

    The undercutting of the material below the slab and new granular base will aid in eliminating settlement of the slab due to any soft spots that have developed and/or bridging over deeper bad areas of soil but will do nothing to eliminate the water issue.

    May also consider discharging the sump pumps way beyond the area of the foundation (hard pipe to lower elevation) to minimize the likelihood of the water running back into the foundation.

    Also make sure that the heaving is not due to an expansive soil issue which will only get worse as you expose more virgin soil. You can google "soil engineer" or "soil testing" to find a local resource.
    Great answer!

    Quote Originally Posted by MooseGooser View Post
    This is basically what they have decided to do.

    An "engineer" came out with maps and such, and said water table is way deeper in this area.. He felt a spring, or possible a broken storm drain from areas above where his,and MINE sit..

    A soil engineer also came out and siad area is known to have severe problems with bentenite(sp) expansive soil.

    Thy are going to remove old rusted broken main drain, cap it off,and replace that drain with a new one that wont be burried under the new slab.

    New "french drains" around perimeter, and One across the middle, leading to drains that will direct water to sump pumps (heavy duty, battery back up, commercial grade).
    Those sump pumps will direct water through drains to a central cistern well away from the house, that will also have a pump in it to divert water to a rock drain to guide water off the property..


    They are going to add rock and then heavily compact the subbase, top that with old road bed,, compact that, then pour a new slab.

    Pricy,, I'm glad its not us!
    We are in suburbia.... this is not rural property.

    Thanks all..
    Make sure they put those sock things on the drains to filter out any small dirt that can work its way into the drain.
    Joe Dickerson

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  8. #8
    Senior Member copterdoc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MooseGooser View Post
    He felt a spring, or possible a broken storm drain from areas above where his,and MINE sit....
    We had a broken water main, between the house and the curb, trying to flood our basement for about a month.

    We noticed it because the sump pump was running a lot more than it should have been.
    We never lost water pressure, and the city had no idea about the break.

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