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Thread: Coyote danger? (GDG)

  1. #41
    Senior Member badbullgator's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HPL View Post
    I haven't heard about any quail dogs getting taken by yotes around here and you's think that they would be the most vulnerable of the hunting dogs. I had the good fortune of having four different yotes coming to the photo site where I put out trimmings I get from the local game processor for vultures and hawks. This is the third photo contest year that I have baited for the birds and finally, this time I got yotes. I wound up with over 400 images of yotes and was pretty thrilled. Even with me completely concealed in a permanent blind, they were pretty wary and any time I became visible to them they were gone like a scalded cat. Twice I allowed myself to be seen at well over 100yds, and the yotes hightailed it. I will be careful when running my knucklehead out there though. I am really more concerned about Javelinas. They can really tear a dog up.
    Coyotes prefer something a bit smaller than a pointer or lab. They like rabbit, terrier, opossum sized food. A single coyote is probably not challenging a dog over 35 pounds. The average size of coyotes is 35-50 pounds and they are not known for taking animals larger than themselves.
    A couple of years ago we had 10-11 little dogs killed in one golf course community with several being taken right off the leash. All were toy dogs in the 10 pound range.
    Views and opinions expressed herein by Badbullgator do not necessarily represent the policies or position of RTF. RTF and all of it's subsidiaries can not be held liable for the off centered humor and politically incorrect comments of the author.
    Corey Burke

  2. #42
    Senior Member HPL's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by badbullgator View Post
    Coyotes prefer something a bit smaller than a pointer or lab. They like rabbit, terrier, opossum sized food. A single coyote is probably not challenging a dog over 35 pounds. The average size of coyotes is 35-50 pounds and they are not known for taking animals larger than themselves.
    A couple of years ago we had 10-11 little dogs killed in one golf course community with several being taken right off the leash. All were toy dogs in the 10 pound range.
    I don't really get that part. I'm fighten ANYTHING that tries to snatch my dog and if he only weighed 8 or 10 lbs, he'd be up over my head in a flash. Of course, I'm still pretty fit and a bit over 6', and been around animals, including big dogs, all my life. I've dived into more than one dog fight and gotten bitten once or twice for my trouble, but I'm not letting some other animal beat up my dog without a fight.
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  3. #43
    Senior Member HuntinDawg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HPL View Post
    I don't really get that part. I'm fighten ANYTHING that tries to snatch my dog and if he only weighed 8 or 10 lbs, he'd be up over my head in a flash. Of course, I'm still pretty fit and a bit over 6', and been around animals, including big dogs, all my life. I've dived into more than one dog fight and gotten bitten once or twice for my trouble, but I'm not letting some other animal beat up my dog without a fight.
    I thought the same thing. The only way I can imagine losing out on that one is if I was caught so unaware that I didn't have time to tighten my grip on the leash or if pup's collar was so loose he just came out of it. Otherwise, it's ON.

    Seriously though, coyotes are a big problem in Georgia, but I've not seen any yet that aren't scared of humans. That isn't to say they won't come around where we live, but the ones I've encountered on my dad's farm take off if they think you've seen them. As for the "city folk moving to the country" talk, when it comes to coyotes it doesn't apply. They are incredibly adaptable. There is a breeding population in every county in Georgia and has been for a long time (10-15 years minimum). Occasionally there is a funny bit on local TV news about a coyote causing problems in Buckhead (downtown Atlanta basically). Folks down there don't know what to think about it and the news reporters are always so uninformed and naive about how many coyotes we have here. I've seen them dead on I-285 (the perimeter highway around Atlanta) many times and also on I-75 and I-85 INSIDE the perimeter). I haven't had any trouble in my subdivision, but if the rabbits start thinning out (they are everywhere) or I hear any concerning news I'll have to go outside every time the dog wants to go out. You wouldn't think my 84 lb. lab would be too tempting of a target, but you never know. They'll probably get my neighbor's Boston Terrier's first and then I'll know what's up. I didn't bother to train my dog on our invisible fence until he was about full grown just in case - I always went out with him.

    Calling and shooting them is great fun and I encourage it, but I don't think you can knock the population down except by trapping. The guy who processes my deer is a serious trapper and he says he has more people wanting him to trap yotes than he could ever get around to. He says the only thing that knocks them down around here is the demodectic mange, but I don't know anything about that.

    They are trying to reduce the number of doe deer killed in Georgia this coming season due to lack of doe/fawn survival which is believed to be due to coyotes.

    The only good coyote is a dead coyote.
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  4. #44
    Senior Member badbullgator's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HPL View Post
    I don't really get that part. I'm fighten ANYTHING that tries to snatch my dog and if he only weighed 8 or 10 lbs, he'd be up over my head in a flash. Of course, I'm still pretty fit and a bit over 6', and been around animals, including big dogs, all my life. I've dived into more than one dog fight and gotten bitten once or twice for my trouble, but I'm not letting some other animal beat up my dog without a fight.
    Most were older people and at least one apparently had a tug of war. I don't recall who won. I tried looking it up in our local paper but they just changed to a pay site and even though I subscribe I can seem to access the archives without signing up and paying.
    Views and opinions expressed herein by Badbullgator do not necessarily represent the policies or position of RTF. RTF and all of it's subsidiaries can not be held liable for the off centered humor and politically incorrect comments of the author.
    Corey Burke

  5. #45
    Senior Member badbullgator's Avatar
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    This is the leash one. Looking through this stations archives I see over 12 dog attacks locally.

    http://www.nbc-2.com/story/10692790/...yote-with-cane
    Views and opinions expressed herein by Badbullgator do not necessarily represent the policies or position of RTF. RTF and all of it's subsidiaries can not be held liable for the off centered humor and politically incorrect comments of the author.
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  6. #46
    Senior Member Mark Teahan's Avatar
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    Don't care.....
    Man has tried for a very long time to bring coyote numbers to acceptable levels using bounties, aerial gunning, poisons, hunting, and trapping to no avail. They are like cockroaches, you cannot kill them all.
    They will survive and multiply no matter what and adapt and learn how to make an easy living off man.

    I can hear a 55 grain v max right now turning one inside out.

    Oh, and sheep and antelope sure are bigger than your quoted preferred size!
    Just sayin.....
    Last edited by Mark Teahan; 06-09-2013 at 10:58 PM.

  7. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pals View Post
    I think the problem is worse where there is no more country left, urban encroachment into habitat is a recipe for disaster. We are overloaded with yotes, more get taken out by cars then guns around here. I live in the boonies, lots of space and still they are constantly coming up to the yard from the wetland. Fair game Marvin-if they stay down there and eat geese we could call a truce. As it is-no animal gets to threaten my Weezie.
    Nancy - When we get a pet we assume a responsibility for that pet as we are changing their lifestyle to conform with ours. They are unconditional in their love for us & we should do our best to reciprocate. As we learn from their mannnerism's they signal all sorts of things to us, if we observe.

    What I haven't read on this thread is that all folks are keeping up their end of the bargain. I got a PM from someone who said they live next to a State Park. Like us the predators like those areas as well as most of us who appreciate having no neighbors.

    I'm just saying the predators perform a service, free of charge, except for an occasional meal. We have a lot of critters from the predator side of the food chain - the herons eat our frogs, the harriers eat our chickens, the redtail hawks leave everything alone eccept the rodents, the bobcat eats the weasels, a young bald eagle came through about 3 weeks ago, you'd have enjoyed how the ducks all scattered into the coves on the pond. We have relatively few mosquito's as there is a population of tree swallows & I mow on high to leave the snakes alive. The only trait I disliked in our heeler was her killing of all snakes, & she was very quick & thorough about it.

    We have a little Mini Pinscher, had your litter from 2 years ago had a female I would have put in a bid on it, but ended up with this little dog shortly after that. None of our dogs get out of our sight, we feel we owe them that for their loyalty & the help they provide.

    I'm not saying there are no problem predators, but what I saw on this thread was a lack of recognition of the predators contribution to society & our contribution toward the crowding of the coyotes.

    We get a lot of wolf stuff in this part of the country - I have a greater concern that they may take up residence in civilized areas. They are real predators with the size & pack instincts to do real damage. Tim talks of the coyotes singing, anyone ever heard a wolf, you'll never forget it.

    Have a nice night, I've rambled far too long, but do feel strongly toward keeping nature in balance with as little assist as possible from humans .
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  8. #48
    Senior Member badbullgator's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Teahan View Post
    Don't care.....
    Man has tried for a very long time to bring coyote numbers to acceptable levels using bounties, aerial gunning, poisons, hunting, and trapping to no avail. They are like cockroaches, you cannot kill them all.
    They will survive and multiply no matter what and adapt and learn how to make an easy living off man.

    I can here a 55 grain v max right now turning one inside out.

    Oh, and sheep and antelope sure are bigger than your quoted preferred size!
    Just sayin.....
    I said preferred, nothing more. Seen them do some damage to calves too
    Views and opinions expressed herein by Badbullgator do not necessarily represent the policies or position of RTF. RTF and all of it's subsidiaries can not be held liable for the off centered humor and politically incorrect comments of the author.
    Corey Burke

  9. #49
    Senior Member PalouseDogs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marvin S View Post
    I find it interesting that many of you would move to the country & then attempt to citify your surroundings. Predators are there for a purpose, had nature not intended them to thrive, she would not have nurtured their development. The two legged predators in the city are much worse than the 4 legged & winged are in this setting.

    We have always lived where there are not a lot of people around, by choice. The wildlife we view on a daily basis, & their trust in our presence, says something about how one conducts themselves in their environment. At no time do we try to make them so unwary that they cannot exist in their environment.

    Coyotes have tried for a couple of our laying hens & gotten a mouthful of tail feathers as a result. Funny how the hens stay by the house when out of their pen, which in turn keeps the household bugs down.

    Predators serve a purpose, they eat lots of rodents & feral cats, don't leave things out that they might like to eat & they will no longer cruise your area on a regular basis. A blank pistol, such as you use for training, will make them keep a healthy distance or at the least, eat the neighbors stuff .

    You folks remind me of those who move to the boonies, yet expect nothing to interfere with the way of life enjoyed by the city folk. If you don't eat it, shooting it is only the choice of last resort.
    Need a like button. I live in the country. The coyotes sing every night. I'm a biologist. I don't see coyotes as cuddly Disney characters. I know they could be a threat to my dogs. I don't have a problem with selective killing of coyotes that get too bold. But, I'm not that eager to live in a world where the only mammals are people, domestic pets and farm animals. I didn't move into the country just to turn it into a little piece of suburbia.
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  10. #50
    Senior Member HuntinDawg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PalouseDogs View Post
    Need a like button. I live in the country. The coyotes sing every night. I'm a biologist. I don't see coyotes as cuddly Disney characters. I know they could be a threat to my dogs. I don't have a problem with selective killing of coyotes that get too bold. But, I'm not that eager to live in a world where the only mammals are people, domestic pets and farm animals. I didn't move into the country just to turn it into a little piece of suburbia.
    Here's the thing: We CAN'T get rid of them. If you fear for the coyote, your fears are unfounded. They are prolific in reproduction and incredibly adaptable. My opinion is that we should kill all we can just to keep from being completely overrun by them. They are wreaking absolute havoc on fawn recruitment (survival rates) in Georgia & South Carolina (other places too, I'm sure, but specific studies have been done in GA & SC) not to mention turkey (which I don't hunt), quail (which are on the brink anyway), ducks, geese, etc. Also, they are not indigenous to Georgia so they should not be here. They are also bad for the fox population and foxes (red & gray) are indigenous to Georgia. I have lived in Georgia since 1968 and became an avid hunter in the 1980's and never saw my first coyote until 1992. They just weren't here. In the 1980's and prior I never heard anyone even talk about a coyote in Georgia. I will kill every one I get an opportunity to kill. I just regret that I don't have time to specifically hunt them.
    ---------------------------------------------
    HRCH "Boomer" MH
    UH HR "Hunter" SH (RIP)

    "When you go to a test or a trial, your dog should be underwhelmed." ~ Evan Graham

    "It is unreasonable to expect a dog to be more precise than you are." ~ Rex Carr

    "You own what you condone." ~ Mike Lardy

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