The RetrieverTraining.Net Forums The Retriever Academy
Total Retriever Training with Mike Lardy
Hawkeye Media Gunners Up Tritronics Outdoor Media
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 16 of 16

Thread: Internal bleeding warning

  1. #11
    Senior Member windycanyon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    WA State
    Posts
    3,762

    Default

    Here's to a speedy recovery! I'd like to add one more thing. Years ago, my vet recommended doing annual bloodwork once they hit that "senior" status (7 yrs). Recently a friend's 11 yo became lethargic, just off... I asked him when the last time was he had bloodwork and he'd never had any done. He goes to the same clinic as I do but has been seeing a different vet and they never mentioned it when they've done shots etc. He had bloodwork the next day and his liver enzymes are extremely high. They thought inflammation, gave antibiotics and a supplement, and when he went back for follow up bloodwork (which no one mentioned but me again..), they were even higher. He saw my vet who recommended an ultrasound, and it was ugly. Now there is nothing that can be done. So do that preventative screening and know what your baselines are. I think the blood panel w/ T4 runs ~$150 total w/ the draw.

  2. #12
    Senior Member uplandbird's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    St Paul, MN
    Posts
    223

    Default

    Sorry about Tank, never easy. Glad to hear Sirius is doing better. Any idea what caused the ulcer so it can be prevented in the future? Be well Sirius!

  3. #13
    Senior Member badbullgator's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    somewhere between Boca Grande and Mims
    Posts
    7,055

    Default

    He has been on Rymadil and Tramadol for a couple years and they are prime suspects. Damned if you do and damned if you don't.
    Views and opinions expressed herein by Badbullgator do not necessarily represent the policies or position of RTF. RTF and all of it's subsidiaries can not be held liable for the off centered humor and politically incorrect comments of the author.
    Corey Burke

  4. #14
    Senior Member uplandbird's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    St Paul, MN
    Posts
    223

    Default

    Boy I wish I could help, I just don't know if those drugs individually or together can cause an ulcer that bad.
    However I can ask a very talented 3rd year vet student who is with us for the summer,
    She loves to tackle medical mystery in animals.
    Why both tramadol and rimadyl combo? Arthritic, hips, knees? You can PM me if you want her opinion and any added info

  5. #15
    Senior Member badbullgator's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    somewhere between Boca Grande and Mims
    Posts
    7,055

    Default

    NSAID's such as Rymadil are known to cause ulcers.

    Side affects include

    Black, tarry stools or flecks of blood in the vomit
    Drowsiness
    Staggering, stumbling, weakness or partial paralysis, full paralysis, dizziness, loss of balance.[7]
    Change in urination habits (frequency, color, or smell)
    Change in skin (redness, scabs, or scratching)
    Change in behavior (such as decreased or increased activity level, seizure or aggression).[8]


    Excess use of Rimadyl can lead to gastritis and ulcer formation.[9] It is also believed that in some breeds of dogs it may induce kidney and liver damage.
    Views and opinions expressed herein by Badbullgator do not necessarily represent the policies or position of RTF. RTF and all of it's subsidiaries can not be held liable for the off centered humor and politically incorrect comments of the author.
    Corey Burke

  6. #16
    Senior Member Julie R.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Orlean VA
    Posts
    2,821

    Default

    Very glad you caught this in time; many including myself, would have just attributed his lethargy/loss of appetite to grief and hoped time was all he needed. I know several people that have had problems from extensive use of rimadyl and other pain meds for dogs, but know others who've had their senior guys on them long term with no ill effects. I'm guessing dogs are like people: some tolerate those meds quite well, even long term, and others get nasty side effects.

    Julie R., Hope Springs Farm
    Chesapeake Bay Retrievers since 1981

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •