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Thread: RTF-An observation & A Suggestion

  1. #131
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shawn White View Post
    I've ate a lot of hot dogs with cheese on them. But i don't professionally compete in hot dog eating contests,....so I guess I am not.

    cream cheese, onion and sauerkraut on a dog. mmmmmm

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    I enjoy CIVIL spirited discussion. Ad hominem attacks are pretty much never helpful. First one to call "stupidhead" loses the argument and my respect. No one, including me, likes being told they are wrong, but I resent name calling and ignore (only reason I ever put anyone ON ignore) those who resort to it.
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  3. #133
    Senior Member luvalab's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul "Happy" Gilmore View Post
    cream cheese, onion and sauerkraut on a dog. mmmmmm
    I am trying to keep an open mind, but cream cheese belongs on a bagel, or a jelly sandwich (white bread).

    Hot dog: Yellow mustard only, Gulden's is best, but French's is fine as well. Sweet pickle relish is acceptable on a poor-quality dog.

    I confess I may need some education and practice on the Chicago dog; I will keep an open mind until I can spend some quality time with a dog-loving native. I hear there could be piccalilly (sp) involved.
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  4. #134
    Senior Member Ken Bora's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marvin S View Post
    Please see comment above - All cheese turns color with aging including Goat cheese - finding the right spot in that process is the key to good tasting cheese.

    I have some award winning Goat cheese that is so hard it can only be used in soups, but is pretty cool there.

    Why is Wisconsin Cheddar Orange?



    There's no law that says Wisconsin cheddar has to be orange, but much of it is. While most cheddars coming from Vermont and New York are white, the majority of Wisconsin cheddar is colored. Why? No one knows for sure, but two prevailing theories suggest it's all about marketing.



    First of all, what makes cheddar orange? All cheese is naturally white, or off white, or even a golden yellow, depending on the type of milk used. But you'll never find a cow that gives orange milk. The color instead comes from the flavorless Annatto seed, which gives Wisconsin cheddar that pumpkin orange hue.



    Sid Cook, fourth-generation owner of Carr Valley Cheese in LaValle, Wis., believes the state's cheddars were tinted orange as far back as the late 1800s. In the early days of Wisconsin cheesemaking, cows dined on carotene-rich pasture, and their milk naturally produced a cheese with a rich golden color. Gradually, some dairies moved their cows off pasture and onto dry feed, with the resulting milk yielding paler cheese. Because consumers already associated the gold color with quality, cheesemakers used Annatto to bring back the color.



    Another theory holds that Wisconsin cheesemakers wanted to differentiate their cheddars from those coming from New York, so they used Annatto seed and turned their cheddars orange, using it as their own claim to fame and capturing a portion of the market.



    No matter the color - white, yellow or orange -- Wisconsin cheddar rules. Today, a handful of the state's cheesemakers are even turning back the clock and crafting Bandage Wrapped, or Cloth-Bound Cheddar, the way cheddar was made in England before the days of refrigeration. Two of my favorites:

    • Eagle Cave Reserve, made by Meister Cheese near Muscoda -- crafted in 6.5 pound "mini" truckles, and aged 6-9 months, this new cheese on the market is one to watch.
    • Cave-Aged Bandage-Wrapped Cheddar by Willi Lehner, Bleu Mont Dairy, near Blue Mounds. A perennial favorite and award-winner. Can't go wrong with this one.


    Both of these cheddars are a natural whitish color and you can find both varieties at Fromagination in Madison. If you're looking for a good aged cheddar, Wisconsin has the corner on that market -- my favorites are:

    • 10-Year Cheddar, Hook's Cheese in Mineral Point
    • 6-Year Cheddar by Widmer's Cheese Cellars in Theresa
    • 4-Year Cheddar by Carr Valley Cheese in LaValle


    All of these cheddars are orange and are widely available in specialty cheese shops. No matter the color, it's hard to go wrong with Wisconsin cheddar.


    Posted by cheese underground lady at 6:54 AM Email ThisBlogThis!Share to TwitterShare to Facebook







    5 comments:

    Mary at LoveTree said... According to international cheese expert, Steven Jenkins,(a.k.a. "Cheese God", "Cheese Guru" "Cheese Wizard"):

    "wisconsin cheddar is orange because ALL american cheddars started out orange -- the early immigrant cheesemakers (300 years ago) were dying their milk with annatto or achiote because it was english farmhouse CHESHIRE that created the market (in london) for english farmhouse CHEDDAR from somerset. ALL cheesemakers wanted their cheese to look like CHESHIRE! and cheshire looked that way (orange) because of the vein of iron in the sub-stratum of soil beneath the pastures of cheshire. the grass that grew was infused with the vitamin D from the grass and the soil, and it tinted the milk and the subsequent cheese a natural, very light ORANGE. cheshire-makers were so proficient at cheesemaking, i.e. their cheeses tasted so good, that their cheeses ruled the london market and fetched the highest prices. the customers became inured to seeking the orange-est cheeses. "

    A bit more in regard to "orange-izing cow milk"
    In regards to dying fluid milk....the Babcock test (which test the true level of butterfat in the milk ) was developed in Wisconsin over one hundred years ago because farmers were paid for their milk based on how "orange/buttery" the milk was, denoting how much butter was in the summer milk. Before the routine use of the Babcock test honest farmers were not getting fair compensation for their milk and dishonest farmers learned how to simmer carrots on the kitchen burner and strain off the liquid, adding it to the fluid milk which dyed the butter fat a pale orange.
    The jersey cow milk that I use from grass fed cows makes for a beautiful creamy orange cheese, at least until the killing freeze, then the milk goes into a deep ivory color once the grass stops growing or once the animals are switched to hay, which, ironically, is when the butterfat is typically the highest.
    Sad to think that Wisconsin commodity cheddar market is based on the practie of "duping" the customer.
    Last edited by Ken Bora; 07-08-2013 at 10:18 PM.
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  5. #135
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    Quote Originally Posted by luvalab View Post
    I am trying to keep an open mind, but cream cheese belongs on a bagel, or a jelly sandwich (white bread).

    Hot dog: Yellow mustard only, Gulden's is best, but French's is fine as well. Sweet pickle relish is acceptable on a poor-quality dog.

    I confess I may need some education and practice on the Chicago dog; I will keep an open mind until I can spend some quality time with a dog-loving native. I hear there could be piccalilly (sp) involved.
    Right on the money! Polish dogs too!
    Bill Davis

  6. #136
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    when you come to Seattle you'll find the street venders at all the ball games selling dogs the way I've described. Try it at your next BBQ- btw- onions must be grilled.

  7. #137
    Senior Member Pals's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul "Happy" Gilmore View Post
    cream cheese, onion and sauerkraut on a dog. mmmmmm
    Now that sounds yummy. I am going to try that. With my whine.

  8. #138
    Senior Member luvalab's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by huntinman View Post
    Right on the money! Polish dogs too!
    I refuse to believe you are from TN.
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  9. #139
    Senior Member Sharon Potter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pals View Post
    Does a heart good how we can still come together to GDG a thread.......I like cheese.
    Specifically, Wisconsin Smoked String Cheese.
    Sharon Potter

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  10. #140
    Senior Member luvalab's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul "Happy" Gilmore View Post
    when you come to Seattle you'll find the street venders at all the ball games selling dogs the way I've described. Try it at your next BBQ- btw- onions must be grilled.
    If you can get it at a (baseball) park, it's probably okay...
    --Greta Ode
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