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Thread: Chronic Crooked Sit

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    Senior Member dgengr's Avatar
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    Default Chronic Crooked Sit

    Methods to correcting a Crooked sit? What are your fixes for this?

    Thanks,

    Dustin
    SHR Goodwins Hat Creek Hound "Gus"

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    Senior Member Wayne Nutt's Avatar
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    I follow TRT 2d and Mike Lardy does it with bird boy blinds. In his dvd he takes a FC dog that has a chronic crooked sit. Somewhere I previously posted this technique. I will look and see if I can find it.
    Wayne Nutt
    Go Nutts with dog training

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    Quote Originally Posted by dgengr View Post
    Methods to correcting a Crooked sit? What are your fixes for this?

    Thanks,

    Dustin
    Crooked how? Doesn't line up facing the marks or sits on one hip sort of thing?
    David Didier, GA

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    If you're talking about a front SIT out in front of you, (and your dog is on a checkcord), you can "snap" the cord with a little pressure on it to get the dog to move more squarely.

    You can walk out there and physically position the dog to a better SIT if you want, and if the dog is on a remote front SIT with no checkcord you can twirl a bumper by the rope to get it's attention and it'll normally square right on up.

    If you're talking about while at SIT beside you, you can use your HEELING Stick to aid you while re-positioning the dog with some lead control pulling up to get the dog to be more square.
    Dawgs are like Savings Accounts-
    You only get out of 'em what you put into 'em.

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    Senior Member Wayne Nutt's Avatar
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    I couldn't find the one I was looking for but did find this one. Hope it helps.

    http://www.retrievertraining.net/for...ht=Crooked+sit
    Wayne Nutt
    Go Nutts with dog training

    HRCH Patton's Parker Co. Shadow "Shadow"
    HRCH Clineline Hijacker "Jack"
    HRCH Marks a Lot Midnight Hudson, SH "Hudson"-retired

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    Senior Member truthseeker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dgengr View Post
    Methods to correcting a Crooked sit? What are your fixes for this?

    Thanks,

    Dustin
    I have tried to address this in the past and received a lot of back lash.

    So I will try a more diplomatic approach this time. If you wish to know more about using plate forms, ( Boards ) PM me and I will give you my phone number.
    Keith

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    Senior Member JoeOverby's Avatar
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    Waiting for Bora and his rope.....
    Joe Overby
    Candler Creek Retrievers
    www.candlercreekretrievers.com
    GRHRCH UH "Hooch" MH (HRC 1500 pt. club)
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    Senior Member Evan's Avatar
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    Anytime I've been asked about a "crooked sit" issue it's been stopping to a whistle, and having the dog fail to completely rotate 180 degrees to squarely face the handler, so that's what I plan to deal with here. As in a previous thread, it should be noted that some dogs are not chronic about this. And some rotate so nearly square that it doesn't affect most of their casting. In those cases it would be of only minimal benefit to spend focused time working on this.

    But, if you send your dog on retrieve and stop him to the whistle, and this is similar to what you see virtually every time...



    ...regardless of distance, I believe you should address it. You'll give fewer overall casts when your casts are more accurate. The further your dog needs to rotate while taking the cast, the less apt he'll be to execute it accurately. I should also mention that a dog that fits the chronic crooked sit description nearly always faces the same way - cocked to the right, or to the left. That is because this behavior reflects the dog's attitude toward this type of control. It may indicate he's lazy, or even resistant to being interrupted on retrieve. It is reasonable that those attitudes would also tend to be reflected in his casting habits as well. The great distance between dog & handler, the greater the likelihood of of poor casts.

    First, the better job the trainer has done teaching two-hands Back, the more readily an effective treatment can be implemented. In the picture above I would expect to be able to give any right-hand cast; Back, or any degree of angle, one thing I would both expect and require is that the dog rotate that way. One reason why this is therapeutic in this treatment is that the dog will not tend to enjoy rotating so far to take his casts, and will also not enjoy being corrected for not taking the rotation. As I lay out my treatment in the field it will become readily understandable why this is important.

    Let's just use this dog as a case study, and treat the situation relative to his constantly stopping and sitting facing left, as you see. For the near future I will stop running conventional blinds because they represent a single destination. That may not allow me enough repetition to work through this issue. So, in order to be more focused on the problem at hand, I'll run blind drills that involve fairly simple blinds in mostly featureless fields so as not to get mired in side issues. The layout of the drill will involve a line of bumpers about every 10 paces across the field. I don't care which one he gets. I care that he improves his fundamental performance, and all those blinds give me the choices I'll need to work on this.



    These don't need to be long blinds. But give yourself 150 yards or so to work with. You may get several handles in a single session. Set the dog up to be sent on the left hand blind so all the extra bumpers will be to your right, requiring him only to rotate correctly when cast. Don't nit pick about the blind. That's why there are many of them. It's assuring he must rotate all the way around to take the cast as given that matters here.

    Two things that appear to have made consistent difference for good in drilling on this are to cast quickly, as soon as the dog has settled into a sit. The second is that I'll make my first cast a right hand straight Back in keeping my casts slim, which gives the dog ample room to take the cast and be rewarded by easily getting a bumper. Usually within 3-5 days the dog is straightening himself up through attrition, rather than by being pressured.

    If it's a dog that may sit facing either direction (I've never had one) adjust your application accordingly so he's required to take a maximum rotation anytime he's cast. We went through this discussion a couple years ago with someone working on this problem, and they cleared it up with that dog in about a week. It's different with each one, and there are other things you can do as well. But I've attained lasting effects this way with quite a few.

    Evan
    "Prepare your dog in such a manner that the work he is normally called upon to do under-whelms him, not overwhelms him." ~ Evan Graham

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    Senior Member Wayne Nutt's Avatar
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    It should come as no surprise that there are different ways to approach a problem.
    Wayne Nutt
    Go Nutts with dog training

    HRCH Patton's Parker Co. Shadow "Shadow"
    HRCH Clineline Hijacker "Jack"
    HRCH Marks a Lot Midnight Hudson, SH "Hudson"-retired

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    Senior Member Evan's Avatar
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    A question I should have anticipated is whether or not you run more than one blind per session, and the answer is "No". And I don't suggest doing more than one session per day. Handle regardless of the line taken. You're running this with the intention of handling so you can deal with the central issue of the crooked sit. No marks with it. No other concepts.

    Evan
    "Prepare your dog in such a manner that the work he is normally called upon to do under-whelms him, not overwhelms him." ~ Evan Graham

    “People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.”

    ― George Bernard Shaw


    The Smartwork System for Retriever Training (link)
    http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?...59&ref=profile

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