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Thread: Obamacare ... the legal stuff

  1. #81
    Senior Member Gerry Clinchy's Avatar
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    TN believes that O-care "navigators" have some credentials
    Although the agency contends it does not limit advice given by navigators and counselors, the rules do state that they may not “discuss the benefits, terms and features of a particular plan over any other health plans and offer advice about which health plan is better or worse or suitable for a particular individual or employer.”


    The rules also require navigators and counselors to be fingerprinted and undergo background checks. Penalties of up to $1,000 for each violation were set in the rules.

    “Our focus is on protecting Tennesseans and taking reasonable and responsible steps to provide consumer safeguards,” said Julie McPeak, commissioner of the Tennessee Department of Commerce and Insurance. “The emergency rules filed on September 20, 2013, require those individuals who will be accessing Tennesseans’ most sensitive personal financial and medical information to have been subject to a criminal background check as mandated by Tennessee Public Chapter 377. These rules are those reasonable and responsible steps.”
    Considering that these people will gather pretty sensitive info (like SS #s), it seems reasonable to weed out any with criminal intent. And it could be reasonable not to expect these people to be able to give advice on choosing different plans. Some on this forum are in this business, and it isn't as easy as it might sound to explain the ins and outs of different plans.

    The Federal govt does not require background checks, but the states are allowed to require them. (that may only apply to states that have agreed to set up state exchanges?)

    So, TN is being sued, for infringement of freedom of speech.
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  2. #82
    Senior Member Gerry Clinchy's Avatar
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    Problems in states that did not opt into a state exchange, which would have expanded Medicaid. This from TX:
    http://conservativestates.com/
    By a quirk in the healthcare law passed in 2010, legal residents who earn less than the federal poverty level aren’t eligible for tax credits on the exchange. The ACA originally required states to enroll citizens making less than 138 percent of the federal poverty level in Medicaid, the joint state-federal health care program for the poor and disabled.


    But the U.S. Supreme Court last year ruled that the federal government could not force the states to expand Medicaid, which Perry has described as already broken.
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  3. #83
    Senior Member Buzz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gerry Clinchy View Post
    Some info that I had not been clear on:

    We must also remember that the employer has an upper cap on how much they can contribute to the employee's coverage (a %-age of compensation, as I recall). If the employer provides insurance, the employees will not be able to join public exchanges. Thus, depending on the final rates, the employees could find themselves more out-of-pocket for their health insurance.
    I don't know of a limit to what employers can contribute toward premiums. There IS a limit to how large a contribution employers can get a credit for. In other words, if you give a very generous contribution you cannot get a tax credit for all of it.

    Also, if your employee contribution exceeds 9.5% of their income, they are entitled to leave their employer plan and buy insurance on the exchange.

    Quote Originally Posted by Gerry Clinchy View Post
    Problems in states that did not opt into a state exchange, which would have expanded Medicaid. This from TX:
    http://conservativestates.com/

    Those people can thank asshats like Perry.
    Last edited by Buzz; 09-30-2013 at 08:40 PM.
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  4. #84
    Senior Member Raymond Little's Avatar
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    Currently min employer contribution is 50%, Ocare pushes that to 60%. Both employers and employees will pay more and get less under the law. Many companies in the oil patch pay 100% for employee and family to attract and keep qualified help but it will become cost prohibitive in 2014. The devils always in the details.
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