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Thread: Looking for ideas to get dog to keep his nose off the ground on the way to the line

  1. #11
    Senior Member Wayne Nutt's Avatar
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    I wouldn't do it with a female that is in heat.
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  2. #12
    Senior Member Huff's Avatar
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    You can have the female in heat run first to give that scent on the line and in the holding blind. That will give you opportunity to work on the problem. Only do this after working on the basics without the added scent of a female in heat. Whenever my female is in we run her first so all dogs get to work on this.

    The retrievers online issue is the spring 2012 issue page 20. It is his warm up and cool down procedure that he writes about.

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  3. #13
    Senior Member truthseeker's Avatar
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    To late, That habit should have been taken care of long ago. Now all you have, is to manage it.

    Keith

  4. #14
    Senior Member mostlygold's Avatar
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    I don't believe it is ever too late to work out a problem. If the dog is a MH at 3 yrs of age, he is obviously a trainable dog. I would do more attention work as suggested, even do some formal heel work with distractions. When we do obedience work, we heel around and by other dogs and demand the dogs attention. Putting bird scent on or near the holding blind and line is also good, as well as putting the bird drying rack right on the way to the line. You can sit him at the holding blind, walk forward 4-5 paces and call him into heel. A here nick correction if he slows down or tries to sniff. Mix it up and keep him guessing.

    Dawn
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  5. #15
    Member Oldfield Retrievers's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mostlygold View Post
    I don't believe it is ever too late to work out a problem. If the dog is a MH at 3 yrs of age, he is obviously a trainable dog. I would do more attention work as suggested, even do some formal heel work with distractions. When we do obedience work, we heel around and by other dogs and demand the dogs attention. Putting bird scent on or near the holding blind and line is also good, as well as putting the bird drying rack right on the way to the line. You can sit him at the holding blind, walk forward 4-5 paces and call him into heel. A here nick correction if he slows down or tries to sniff. Mix it up and keep him guessing.

    Dawn
    x 2............. Heal nick Heal when he puts his nose down.

    Limit the collar pressure to a separate obedience training session focusing on this problem.

    Possibly more singles
    Faster training pace
    birds
    Reduced training/work schedule
    Shorten things up a little to add some excitement
    Less collar pressure at the line.

    Maybe a bugging issue, boredom or basic refusal.

    Ken
    Ken Arbogast

  6. #16
    Senior Member DarrinGreene's Avatar
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    I'd bet this isn't the only avoidance behavior the dog has.

    His working life doesn't sound like a whole lot of fun if she's constantly correcting him on the way to the line.

    He's either avoiding the work because of the constant nagging or didn't care about it in the first place.

    It's a job for a pro or a really experienced amateur IMHO.

    If he were mine I would see if making his work more fun solved the problem. Give him a duck to carry to the line then graduate to me carrying the duck and him focusing on me, then finally fade the duck out. If he's carrying a duck and puts it down to sniff you have a good clear fetch correction on a force fetched dog. One or two of those thoroughly applied ought to get his head in the game.

    This may be a dumb approach but you will know in one or two series whether or not it affects his attitude, so to me, one day's training to experiment with it is worth while.

    The alternative would be the Bohn approach to line manners and obedience, which, if you look it up there are numerous threads referring to it. Search for Randy's postings of "noisy dogs" or something like that and you should come up with them.

    Some good old fashioned prong collar heeling wouldn't hurt him either by the sounds of it.
    Last edited by DarrinGreene; 07-30-2013 at 07:46 PM.
    Darrin Greene

  7. #17
    Senior Member truthseeker's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=mostlygold;1131485]I don't believe it is ever too late to work out a problem. If the dog is a MH at 3 yrs of age, he is obviously a trainable dog. I would do more attention work as suggested, even do some formal heel work with distractions. When we do obedience work, we heel around and by other dogs and demand the dogs attention. Putting bird scent on or near the holding blind and line is also good, as well as putting the bird drying rack right on the way to the line. You can sit him at the holding blind, walk forward 4-5 paces and call him into heel. A here nick correction if he slows down or tries to sniff. Mix it up and keep him guessing.

    Dawn[/QUOT

    No one ever read the whole post, just the part to argue.

    You must be a good manager.

    The point I was trying to make was that, in the future, if the OP was to take care of this during the heeling stage of training. There would not be a problem and they would not need our advise. When you are teaching heel and the dog head goes to the ground jerk up on the lead and say no. ( Do not let their head go to the ground) SOUND SIMPLE DOESN'T IT.

    Keith

  8. #18
    Senior Member Sabireley's Avatar
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    I might treat it in training like bugging. He is not focusing on the task at hand and is avoiding the task by sniffing the ground and not paying attention.

    If he is very food oriented, you might try OB drills with the food bowl down and in sight. The food creates a very intense distraction. Demand a high standard of compliance and do it every day at dinner time. I do it every day with one of my strong willed dogs and it made a big difference in training and in trials. The first week of the food bowl drill was a struggle and now she is a soldier. It credit it for improving our communication and teamwork.
    Last edited by Sabireley; 07-30-2013 at 08:30 PM.

  9. #19

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    Thanks to all for digging in and coming up with some great ideas. She's already working with the idea that Wayne posted and will add some of the others as well. Thanks to everyone. I also understand why at times we tend to think there's not much we can do, but I learned a very important lesson from a long time field trialer, you can always step back, revisit training, and then move forward. She's doing that now. I don't always post on the site, but read it often. The shared knowledge between everyone is great. Thanks again.

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