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Thread: Off topic...Fawns

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    Senior Member dogcommand's Avatar
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    Default Off topic...Fawns

    Do any of you know at what age a whitetail deer fawn can make it on its own in the wild? We had a doe with twins but for the last two days the fawns seem to be on their own. Grazing and lying around in our front yard. (It has been 92 degrees or more for 8 days straight). We have does and fawns every year but I have never seen them left "unattended" for so long. There is nothing we can do about it as it is illegal to feed or care for them but I am curious what their chances are if their mom is gone.
    "I love the winning, I can take the losing, but most of all I love to play"

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    Senior Member Erik Nilsson's Avatar
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    From our Game Commission website

    Quote PGC

    "Fawns are functionally weaned by the time they are 10 weeks old. They will still nurse if allowed up until they are 5 or 6 months old. However, this is not necessary for their survival. After 10 weeks of age, fawns are perfectly capable of obtaining food on their own by grazing and browsing. Deer do learn feeding behavior so the longer a doe and fawn are together, the more the fawn learns."
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    Doe's will leave their young in a safe place when they are out and about. From what I have read in the past, fawn mortality rates hover around 50% and typically the biggest influences to their survival are nutrition and body mass. Not sure what the stats would be for no momma but maybe she really trusts your house and knows when you are out and about?
    Erik B.

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    Senior Member duk4me's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Erik Nilsson View Post
    From our Game Commission website

    Quote PGC

    "Fawns are functionally weaned by the time they are 10 weeks old. They will still nurse if allowed up until they are 5 or 6 months old. However, this is not necessary for their survival. After 10 weeks of age, fawns are perfectly capable of obtaining food on their own by grazing and browsing. Deer do learn feeding behavior so the longer a doe and fawn are together, the more the fawn learns."
    Thanks very interesting. I have seen three sets of twins on my place. Now one fawn has disappeared I'm sure something got it. I didn't know that at 10 weeks they could survive. I have always heard that the longer they can stay with the doe the greater their chance of long term survival.
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    Senior Member Erik Nilsson's Avatar
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    I came across one about this time last year working on swim by, darn near stepped on it. It never moved so we went to a different pond.

    At my parents property we get several sets of them, this year we have twins and triplets running around

    deer.jpg


    Mom said the other night while having dinner, they all walked across the deck from the front yard, cute until they start eating the all plants
    HRC- Our season never ends

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    Senior Member metalone67's Avatar
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    Being a deer hunter I've seen fawns as early as 3 months old make it on their own. I would scout from June till season started and had a set of twins make it after the mother was hit in the road.
    Just leave them be and don't feed them.

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    Senior Member dogcommand's Avatar
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    Thanks guys, that is what I wanted to know. Hope that they make it....even if they do eat things that we plant but can't fence!
    "I love the winning, I can take the losing, but most of all I love to play"

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    They birth twins for a reason, as mentioned above mortality rate is about 50%. If they are no longer spotted they can make it on their own.

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    Senior Member Breck's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dogcommand View Post
    Thanks guys, that is what I wanted to know. Hope that they make it....even if they do eat things that we plant but can't fence!
    .
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    Unfortunately my 7yo CLM haphazardly added to the mortality rate....while walking on our farm about a month ago, he found one lying in the grass and decided to try and pick it up and deliver it to hand.......the doe almost stomped him and I yelled and he dropped it, but unfortunately when I went to check on it later it had expired....I didn't see a mark on it, but I think he squeezed it in the middle too much.... Funny because he won't give an adult deer a second glance, but I don't think he knew what the fawn was......

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