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Thread: Proper heeling

  1. #11
    Senior Member Wayne Nutt's Avatar
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    What is the "force" in the force to the pile that you are currently teaching?
    Wayne Nutt
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  2. #12
    Senior Member J. Walker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RiverRat1 View Post
    When training my dog I notice that as he gets tired he starts sitting farther away from the heel position and rolls over on his hip(crooked sit).

    How do I correct this? I am currently teaching him force to pile and he is 1 year old.

    I also just ordered a heeling stick but I have never used/trained with one, how do I incorporated the heeling stick to force him to heel properly?
    Work on heeling beside curbs or sidewalks to crowd the dog, forcing him to sit squarely. I am not aware of a single competitive obedience trainer who uses a whip.
    "When a good trainer stops learning about dogs, he stops being a good trainer." the late Gene Hill

    "If you want to find out what kind of trainer you are, leave your transmitter in the truck." the late Rex Carr

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  3. #13
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    If he's that far away then he hasn't gotten "here" yet. There are many ways to fix the problem but that far away from you the lazy sit is not the only issue. Wayne's suggestion of having the dog on lead is a good one. If you don't want to do that then give a nick "here" to get the dog to come to you before worrying about anything else.

  4. #14

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    Force is the e collar nick to pile..

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tony Marshall View Post
    If he's that far away then he hasn't gotten "here" yet. There are many ways to fix the problem but that far away from you the lazy sit is not the only issue. Wayne's suggestion of having the dog on lead is a good one. If you don't want to do that then give a nick "here" to get the dog to come to you before worrying about anything else.

    I started trying with a lead n I have better control to get I'm close to me and the use the heeling stick. Will continue to do this until he gets heel correctly...

  6. #16
    Senior Member jackh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ada5771 View Post
    -I would highly recommend getting on a structured training program. From what it sounds like you have skipped some very crucial building steps in the overall training goal. Each program will vary but the ultimate training goal will be the same. Each program teaches building blocks you will need to work with in the future. It is curtail whatever program you follow you do not skip any steps and follow it closely. Most programs teach with a heeling stick in formal obedience as a puppy and use the heeling sticks for other teaching drills such as stick fetch and stick to pile later on. I would recommend do a little research and pick a training program and start from basic obedience with your dog even though it is a year old and you will quickly see how each step builds on the next. It is also helpful because many successful armatures and pro trainers on RTF follow these same training programs and can help you out when you are struggling at any step threw out the program. But itís hard for anyone to give you advice if you do not follow a structure program and flowchart because no one knows what the dog has completed or not.


    -I also sent you a Privet Message with the link to the whistle i use.
    What whistle are you using?

    I would recommend Bill Hillman's training a retriever puppy DVD. I have heard it can be used with older dogs to get a good foundation just as well as it can for young dogs. Lardy's TRT is what I started after Hillman.

  7. #17
    Senior Member ada5771's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jackh View Post
    What whistle are you using?
    The one he was reffering to was a Roy Gonia Special
    Drew Allain

    Cajun Made King "Zeus"

  8. #18
    Senior Member metalone67's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tim Carrion View Post
    Sitting over on their hip at 1yo after exertion I would get a priliminary hip x-ray.

    Tim
    Why is it every time someone posts a question on a training an auto reply is get to the vet. I have a dog that does the same thing and it's nothing to do with hips.
    She's a goof and I screwed up in training.
    The foundation to a great retriever is obedience.
    Firestorms Full Throttle Chevy aka Callie-Roo 7/5/2007 - 10/25/2013 I miss you every day
    Proud owner of Kona's Surfer Girl, aka Loki.

  9. #19
    Senior Member PalouseDogs's Avatar
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    If possible, I think you need to look for a pro in your area who will give private lessons, because there are so many things that could be adding to your problems on the heel.

    How long are your training sessions for heel? Are they short and productive or are you marching around in circles for 15 or 20 minutes at a time? Too much pointless drilling, especially in the heat of summer, can cause a dog to sprawl sit or lag at heel, and eventually to dread the training.

    Before you correct for heel, the dog has to understand what heel means. Are you letting him know when he's RIGHT as well as when he's wrong? If you are constantly correcting without praise, how does he know when he's doing the right thing? Before you haul out the heeling stick, make sure he knows what he's supposed to be doing. Get A Rope. (Well, a leash.) Don't let him be so wrong that he's several feet away.
    Kelly Cassidy (person)

    HR Maple Cassidy CDX JH RE (golden retriever)
    Alder Cassidy CDX RE (standard poodle chipmunk chaser)
    plus whacked-out weird Burka (elderly mix-breed rescue girl)

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by PalouseDogs View Post
    If possible, I think you need to look for a pro in your area who will give private lessons, because there are so many things that could be adding to your problems on the heel.

    How long are your training sessions for heel? Are they short and productive or are you marching around in circles for 15 or 20 minutes at a time? Too much pointless drilling, especially in the heat of summer, can cause a dog to sprawl sit or lag at heel, and eventually to dread the training.

    Before you correct for heel, the dog has to understand what heel means. Are you letting him know when he's RIGHT as well as when he's wrong? If you are constantly correcting without praise, how does he know when he's doing the right thing? Before you haul out the heeling stick, make sure he knows what he's supposed to be doing. Get A Rope. (Well, a leash.) Don't let him be so wrong that he's several feet away.
    I don't teach heel daily as a lesson but I think I need to start. He knows what it means but u are right I don't praise when he does it right n don't reprimand when wrong. Already got him on lead now for every training.

    Thanks to all for your responses.

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