The RetrieverTraining.Net Forums The Retriever Academy
Total Retriever Training with Mike Lardy
Hawkeye Media Gunners Up Tritronics Outdoor Media
Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 32

Thread: Age of first hunt.

  1. #11
    Senior Member uplandbird's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    St Paul, MN
    Posts
    223

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CodyC View Post
    Haha cool. Nice picture too..
    Well thank you. I keep forgetting that everyone in this great country hasn't the same previlgious as I do with hunting upland and waterfowl!
    I love love pheasant hunting. Waterfowl hunting comes in a close second.
    This is a picture of Fin in Saskawhen, Canada.
    He was 10 weeks old. I Did NOT have him in the field but in a crate not to far away (up there a mile is close) until after the hunt.
    I threw a goose and duck out there just to see what he'd do.

    image-1322214783.jpg





    image-1059764570.jpg



    I think the exposure can only help. You can see he got the fact these are his. Can't wait for this waterfowl / pheasant season. He will be ~13monthes old when early goose opens.

  2. #12
    Senior Member blackasmollases's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Union mills In.
    Posts
    261

    Default

    [QUOTE=CodyC;1134353]Just curious at what age do most people take their dog on it's first hunt. I know a lot depends on the dog and it's maturity.

    My last dog's first hunt was when she was 10 months old. She was ready for it though. My new dog (male) is coming along nicely but he is only 5 months. He has a long way to go. Probably won't make it out this season[/

    QUOTE]



    I don't understand the rush?
    Black as mollases, call name Strap

    Sire: Fc Afc Land ahoy "PIRATE"

    Dam: Ten bears little bit "BUTTON"

  3. #13
    Senior Member CodyC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    361

    Default

    How can you not understand the rush? I am very eager to enjoy a hunt with the dog. That first hunt is always a blast but i do understand that patients is key. I love hunting with dogs. That's the rush. You get to reap the benefits of hard work and that feels good.

  4. #14
    Senior Member HNTFSH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    1,195

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CodyC View Post
    How can you not understand the rush? I am very eager to enjoy a hunt with the dog. That first hunt is always a blast but i do understand that patients is key. I love hunting with dogs. That's the rush. You get to reap the benefits of hard work and that feels good.
    If you've trained and hunted over a nicely finished dog your interpretation of a 'rush' changes.
    We shoot dogs with a Canon

  5. #15
    Senior Member CodyC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    361

    Default

    ^^^ That's very true. I guess the word "rush" doesn't fit what I mean. It's eagerness. There is nothing wrong with that in my opinion. and it's not stupid eagerness. when the dog is ready for the hunt I take him. I am not a professional trainer by any means but I can get a dog to the point where "most" people are impressed with his ability in the field. I do not run field trials. I hunt. If the dog sits, stays, retrieves when I tell him, brings the bird back and is ready for the next one, then I call him ready.

    I know from readimg a lot of peoples post on here that a good majority of the members here hold their training to higher standards and are in a different category than me. I do not mean to step on anyone's toes at all. Thats just the way I feel.

  6. #16
    Member Troy Fields's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Shapleigh, Maine
    Posts
    48

    Default

    I hunted my pup of 7 months last year. Our season starts in October and runs through January. She was the only dog on these hunts and made 118 retrieves during that time. Did we have things to work on for this season? Absolutely, but last year was one of the most memorable years I've had afield in a long time and it was due to having my pup there with me, giving joy and making people say wow everyday. Best of luck this season to you and your pup. P.S. not sure if it makes a difference but this was all water work (from beaver flowages to the Atlantic) and I shot only a handful of times last year, I simply handled the dog all season.
    Last edited by Troy Fields; 08-11-2013 at 07:41 AM.

  7. #17
    Senior Member HNTFSH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    1,195

    Default

    As many times as the 'how old' question has been asked on dog forums it really comes down to the sensibility and fair objective of the owner and the maturity, readiness of the dog. Not to mention what 'hunting' means.

    For every 1 dog that does 'great' at 7 months there's likely a dozen that got corrected poorly, owner had too big an ego around peers or dog had never had a crip and found being face pecked to its displeasure.

    There's a lot more that goes into when Rover should be out there than age. And/Or at what pace, what kind of hunt, how many guns and what type of landscape. Given the garbage performance I see in public fields with MATURE dogs...can't make the widespread proclamation of what age a pup should be out there.
    We shoot dogs with a Canon

  8. #18
    Senior Member CodyC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    361

    Default

    ^^^ that's true too. I realize all that. I stated in my first post that it all depends on the maturity level of the dog. Also, this thread was not about asking what age I should take my dog hunting, it was asking what age do most people take their dog on their first hunt. Just poking around starting conversation. I completely agree that if taken when when the dog is not ready it can do more harm than good.

    Like I said, my last dog was ready (or what I call ready for what I needed her to do) at 10 months. This male I have now is only 5 months now so who knows where he will be when season rolls around. Fortunately for me, my brother understands a dogs first time in the blind and we work pretty good together by not getting caught up in the hunt and actually working the dog. A lot of people are too blood thirsty for that

  9. #19
    Senior Member HNTFSH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    1,195

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CodyC View Post
    ^^^ that's true too. I realize all that. I stated in my first post that it all depends on the maturity level of the dog. Also, this thread was not about asking what age I should take my dog hunting, it was asking what age do most people take their dog on their first hunt. Just poking around starting conversation. I completely agree that if taken when when the dog is not ready it can do more harm than good.

    Like I said, my last dog was ready (or what I call ready for what I needed her to do) at 10 months. This male I have now is only 5 months now so who knows where he will be when season rolls around. Fortunately for me, my brother understands a dogs first time in the blind and we work pretty good together by not getting caught up in the hunt and actually working the dog. A lot of people are too blood thirsty for that
    I realize what your first post was about and think you do have the right idea. I've responded on what you asked, not what you do/did. I'm just stating that when asking about what age - as you know, it's often too subjective, not objective enough, a call.

    Not to mention what I do - shouldn't be in any form suggestive of what other people should do. THAT'S what these types of posts end up reading like to a newbie. And many are looking for justification or nudge to do so despite their dog not truly ready for the ups and downs of a hunt, and under what scenarios.

    I took knucklehead out last year at 7 months with the purpose of keeping him the box during my hunt on private property. Something a dog needs to adapt to, if and when a dog might need to stay in the box for awhile on a hunt.

    Luckily for us both the last light Woodie I'd shot as a crip took to land with a game of hide-n-seek at dusk. Dog unloaded, picked up trail, bagged the bird.

    Just agreeing with you but believe those young early hunts need a lot of structure and an objective beyond 'seeing what the pup will do' or 'impressing anyone' including myself.
    We shoot dogs with a Canon

  10. #20
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    14

    Default

    I can't decide if I will be hunting my pup this year either. I am thinking a couple of dove hunts will do her good.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •