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Thread: Problems with Heel!

  1. #11
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    No offense intended but it sounds like your first time and no matter what you might think, you can't learn from a DVD or the internet. Find someone who knows what they are doing to help you. Heel and Sit and Here are some of the simplest things to teach these dogs and you need to get it right.
    Having said that, I will tell you what I do with pups that insist on walking too far in front.
    Get a lead that is long enough to have the dog at heel on a fairly tight but not strangling lead and the lead needs to be long enough to drag the ground after it goes through your hand on the side away from the dog. As you are walking with the dog at heel, twirl the long end of the lead right in front of your knee so the dog whacks itself when it gets in front of you. Spin it in a circle ith your off lead hand. Let the dog learn where the boundary is by staying in the proper position. It may take a little practice but this is how I have taught several energetic dogs to stay with me.
    Don't even think e collar until you know what you are doing.
    MP
    Last edited by Mike Perry; 12-31-2014 at 01:05 PM.
    The pain of regret is much worse than the pain of hard work.

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  3. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tony Marshall View Post
    A good method to use to stop pulling is to counteract it. Your dog is old enough to start using other aversives other than the chain. Start putting pressure on the sit command either with stick or collar and the result should be lagging at heel. Voila! Pulling is gone.
    Yes, it is sort of a indirect pressure. Also, do turnabouts, pulls on lead, pass lead being you or as you pleasure, turn into dog kinda clumsy that way, or turn away on the turn in the opposite direction. Do front sits remotes if you please, have dog come to a heel position , stepping through or forward to the side you heel on. Also, do sits with making dog stay, go to end of lead, call dog to a remote in front, sit, then walk forward into a heel position. A "good" obedience class at the local park district or school, would help with hands on instruction. Pulling on lead is not about extreme drive with the dog, but, compliance and teamwork with you and the dog. In fact some extreme drive dogs, especially Goldens, are very good in the obedience ring. Labradors not so good and some are pouters when leash pressure is put on them.. Lots of other things to try, but, you have a very young dog, no need to resort to harsh measures at this stage of the game, including the e-collar!
    Earl Dillow

  4. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Perry View Post
    No offense intended but it sounds like your first time and no matter what you might think, you can't learn from a DVD or the internet. Find someone who knows what they are doing to help you. Heel and Sit and Here are some of the simplest things to teach these dogs and you need to get it right.
    MP
    no offense taken. We only have a few good dog training places here. One relies soley on eollars, the other only on treats no chain or prong allowed, and others require initial boarding at their facility. I did come across a trainer Guy Yeaman, he has one on one and group classes. I'm not sure if anyone has heard of him?

    As I said before our local retriever club is not operating at the moment. Winter.

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  6. #14

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    Earl Dillow has excellent suggestions. He is a successful sensible effective trainer.
    What is in the earlier post showing the picture of the dog pulling is just teaching the dog to pull. Has nothing to do with "teaching heeling". Write me at [email protected] and I can give you some references on articles and books on basic obedience, Best option is a mentor who is willing to spend time with you on and off for multiple months . We all benefit by another trainer discussing what we are doing with us. . The next steps in training (likely) are going to need some support and analysis of what is happening and why. If you write me privately and tell me where you live, I might be able to give you some help on finding what you need. ( I only look at RTF a couple times a week so don't expect me to see a post from you) Looks like a very nice dog who has no idea that it is not doing what you want. As said in another post --- pressure won't cure your problem.

    just noticed that the Golden was not the person who initially wrote ---but message remains the same.

    Marilyn

    Marilyn J Fender, PhD
    Windstorm Retrievers - Wisconsin and Georgia
    Home of 1996 NFC FC AFC Storm’s Riptide Star and birthplace to QAA of 2000 CNAFC CFC CAFC Quik Windstorm
    And others including a new son of NFC living here called "Pick". [email protected]
    Last edited by Marilyn Fender; 12-31-2014 at 01:30 PM.

  7. #15
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    The prong collar should be positioned high up on the neck just behind the ears. Take out a few links if needed. Good Luck!

  8. #16
    Senior Member Joe Brakke's Avatar
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    Look into the Delmar Smith Wonder Lead, it can assist with teaching heel, I like the stiffness and how it opens when relaxed teaching the dog the correct heel position. When heeling I also will only use a choke collar where the ratcheting of the chain teaches the dog to back off and not pull or lead ahead. Also good for applying pressure on the sit command.

    Placement of the lead or choker should be high and directly behind the ears, you'll have better control of the head for heeling. Allowing it to hang low around low on the neck puts the lead in a powerful area of the dog, near the shoulders. With the high on the head lead position they have less pull power and they tend to pay attention to changes in direction better. Also what is key in any training session is that you have the attention of the dog. Heeling will encourage this, a good healer is always looking back or up to you and making eye contact with you.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JXlcSgwG2CM
    Joe B.

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  9. #17
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    I made a little clip for you ,,
    This dog does not know heal nor does it walk on a leash,, its the only one here that has not had the exercise,,so thats why I used him
    Most dogs take 2 or 3 minutes to get walking nicely on a leash,,this one took only a few seconds ,so sorry about that. Because of that there is very little time when the dog is pulling.so you don't have a whole lot of instructional video,,,also I have not taught this dog to sit,,because of its occasional tendencies to sit during a woe command. He likes to crowd birds ,,so we're working through that.
    One thing to keep in mind so you don't think i'm an axe murderer,,,is,,this dog yelps really ,really easy so ,,I was being gentile with it,,it then gives me a few appeasement behaviors and I correct for it,,then the walk goes good from there. After your dog is walking nice on a leash,heal goes much smoother.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9Nbc...m-upload_owner
    Happy New Year
    Pete
    Last edited by Pete; 01-01-2015 at 12:13 AM.
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  10. #18
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    Wolfatomic

    Good luck. Although I had an excellent heel in obedience class what I got in the field was far different. What I did was reteach heel under field conditions. And my reteaching was not command based, it was not drag and nag. I went back to square one in the field with my teaching, starting with no distractions and gradually introducing distractions. And I spent a lot of time at it. Now I have what I want. And now I can give corrections.

    I think you need to reteach the heel. The dog has already learned to do the wrong thing, that's why you keep getting it. And of course this happens in the field where the dog gets the ultimate reward, the retrieve.
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  11. #19
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    compliance really starts With "sit", way back at the food bowl and at the kennel door. you want the dog to understand that being calm they get what they want. Sit still, when they comply "yes" put the bowl on the ground and then release them "OK". step 2, I go to the kennel door and say "sit" if the dog complies, I go to open the door, if they don't I stop and close the door. I repeat this until I can open the door, step to their side and put the lead on. Step 3, Once I got the lead on and the dog is calm I say "OK" If the dog forages I say "sit" When the dog sits I say "yes" You can give them a treat if it makes you feel better about yourself, but I do not. I feel that they really don't care one way or another in the long run and I am not a food dispenser. I do this until I get some what of a compliance, It dose not have to be perfect. Then I use the yuk and jerk or or the drag and nag. These are negative terms that the PC trainers use to make a point. All it really is, is following your lead. You are at a sit. 'OK" When the dog starts to move ahead of you, step 90 degrees from your original line leash check in, walk a few paces "sit", lease check up "yes" I do not say anything on the heel at this point, just on the sit. When I get compliance I will bridge The leash check with heel. Leash check in "heel", compliance "yes", "sit" Leash check up compliance "yes".

    Hope this helps.

    Keith

    This seems like it will take a long time, but it only takes a few days.

  12. #20
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    Ok, here's something you could try, and as a previous poster has said, you do really need to start again as the dog doesn't understand 'heel' or relate to it as being what you want - I teach all my young dogs to heel off lead first and then put the lead on later when they are already heeling! Voila. No pulling, as they are already holding position as they have learnt where the best place to be is. The lead is just added on, and plays no role in holding the dog in position, so no pulling. It's a bit 'head about tail', but if you can get your mind around it, it really works.

    I use a treat to lure the dogs nose into the correct position, with my left hand on my left leg just down the outside of my thigh. When the pup breaks the position or loses concentration, I just say 'ah ah' and then produce the treat under it's nose and lure it back to the desired place again, where it is rewarded with treat and praise. I only do a few steps in a confined space (like the kitchen) and it is a bit of a game where the pup has to follow my hand (which eventually becomes a hand target) and stick by my leg. They enjoy doing it. There is no pressure, although I do mark verbally when the dog is wrong and when they are right. With a bit of care/patience you soon have the dog heeling, and then you can transition this to outside.

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