Finally - A Japanese Apology to US POWs ! - Page 2
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Thread: Finally - A Japanese Apology to US POWs !

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by BonMallari View Post
    what about all the Americans of Japanese descent that we put in internment camps like the one in Manzanar Calif..That was a very ugly part of American history that seems to go unnoticed...
    Not unnoticed Bon, disgusting. What about Nanking and unit 731 if you want to discuss unnoticed?
    Last edited by [email protected]; 07-20-2015 at 07:01 AM.
    Walt Gedney

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  3. #12
    Senior Member Paul Frey's Avatar
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    Both my father and my uncle were in WWII. Dad was only 17 when he went in. My uncle was a cook in the Navy and his ship was sunk twice. My father says that he will talk about the first time, but not the second. I remember as a kid visiting him and his family. We drove down in a Honda Accord. He came out and said hello and then asked my dad to get the car out of his driveway. I don't blame him one bit, but the years have softened him. He is 92 now. Dad is 88.

  4. #13
    Senior Member BonMallari's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by [email protected] View Post
    Not unnoticed Bon, disgusting. What about Nanking and unit 731 if you want to discuss unnoticed?
    Yup, it was Japanese atrocities like that that NEVER left my Dad, he recounted in his memoirs about coming into Filipino towns and seeing the aftermath of executions, it also served to inspire he and his troop to eliminate as many of the enemy as they encountered...
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    A few things that I learned still ring true. "Lanse when you get a gift, say thank you and walk away. When you get a screwing walk away. You are going to get a lot more screwings than gifts"

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  6. #14
    Senior Member HPL's Avatar
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    Several years ago I read a book called "The Rape of Nanking". It is interesting, in school we learned all about the genocidal atrocities committed by the Germans in WWII, and about the Bataan death march, but I don't remember hearing anything about what the Japanese did in the rest of Asia. In some ways what they did makes the Nazis look tame.
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    Quote Originally Posted by HPL View Post
    Several years ago I read a book called "The Rape of Nanking". It is interesting, in school we learned all about the genocidal atrocities committed by the Germans in WWII, and about the Bataan death march, but I don't remember hearing anything about what the Japanese did in the rest of Asia. In some ways what they did makes the Nazis look tame.
    If you want to read something that can shed some light on why that is, you should google an article written by Nicholas Kristof for the NY TImes in 1995. The article's not about the rape of Nanking, but another atrocity in Manchuria. Where plague still rears it's ugly head every once in a while, even today.
    As Bon mentions in one of the earlier posts, we are not totally innocent. Though our crimes are far less severe then the ones committed in China by the Japanese. My point is that we acknowledge our mistakes and misdeeds. They're in the history books and we don't shy away from looking in the mirror. It's my understanding that many of Japans atrocities are conspicuously missing from their history books. Hidden away where no one has to confront them.
    Walt
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  8. #16
    Senior Member swliszka's Avatar
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    Walt you are "absolutely" correct regarding Japanese reluctance to acknowledge their WWII roles. The few Japanese historians who have been brave enough to criticize and publish alternative perspectives have been ostracized or marginalized as anti-Japanese. The "Faustian Bargain" Americans made with the Japanese was to allow the Emperor continued national reverence and use that obedience to de-militarize Japan. The Cold War was "game on." The Japanese took that military energy/defeat and applied it to their industrial rebuilding and marketing with US assistance. The Japanese refuse to look at themselves unlike the Germans.

    This re-examination process is called historiography.

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