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Thread: spinning

  1. #1
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    Default spinning

    My 1.5 year old Boykin has a lot of prey drive, and is very active. But she spins 360 when retrieving ducks, leaving the line on marks or blinds, walking at heel, and reheeling. She continues on quickly after spinning on marks and blinds but then doesn't mark as well. Noing and recalling her, or back-nick-back after spinning doesn't seem to help. Any advice from those who have experience with this phenomena. Thanks. JD

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  3. #2
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    Some say it is caused by to much pressure, I dont know. I have a dog who is inclined to spin when she doesnt understand what I am asking of her. Calling back is a confidence buster and I wouldnt recommend. If you can anticipate the spin and are fast enough you can unwind them with a back nic back in the opposite direction of the spin. Im usually not quick enough and will give a no sit. I will then walk up and recast the dog in a remote sit in the opposite direction of the spin. I have had success with that. She hasn't spun in quite a while. It is hard to break, especially if it is now engrained habit. Good luck with your pup.

  4. #3
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    I would not use pressure to fix a problem likely caused by pressure/lack of confidence/progressing too fast (that's a young dog), etc. Set up marks so close that she really cannot spin, use birds as much as possible, visible gunners and do SINGLES only. Get her SLOWLY stretched back to "normal" lengths doing singles, the idea is complete success and develop confidence. Then shorten back up and try an easy double. Slowly ease her back into doing more multiple sets. Even when doing triples, do most of your training with singles. Too many people set up "tests" instead of training, I do train on singles a lot, save the multiples for new grounds where the dog is not as likely to remember old falls.
    Same for blinds use sight blinds, bird boy blinds, walk out blinds. Make them simple and get a routine of success. Develop some permanent blinds they really help with confidence, these are blinds that can have various or multiple factors, but you start close and teach the blind like on the pattern blind field. The dog will remember and go with confidence, again establishing the habit for just going without spinning.

    If you are really new into retriever training, find a local club and get help from a more experienced person.

    Good luck
    Nate Baxter, DVM
    Clarksville, OH

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  6. #4
    Senior Member EdA's Avatar
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    I am sad to tell you that this is an almost unsolvable problem, there are 2 others, people will tell you they have a remedy but rarely do any of those remedies work. If your dog spins in training you have a chance but not without the hands on assistance of a very experienced trainer with impecable timing.

  7. #5

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    Back off on the training difficulty. Slow things down, build confidance.
    Dale Long

    Long's Riptide Charlie Brown SH. Charlie
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  8. #6
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    I have had 3 over the years. 2 could not be fixed.
    The last, I saw it coming and almost got in front of it. It is/was a genetic thing with her as a distant cousin was a spinner also.
    I got her to focus in front by placing at heel, commanding "Mark" then held the bumper, low right in front of her nose. Tossed with a back hand flip then command for retrieve. The dog almost HAS to go straight as the bumper right in front and very short and visible keeps the forward focus. This dog is very motivated and loved to work. About 1 in 10 longer marks in HT training will get a spin.
    As Dr.Ed stated, IMO this is almost uncurable. 2 of the 3 were mine and I sold them to hunters that simply wanted a meat dog. Got a report on one after 2 years and was doing a credible job in the blind but the expectations from the owner were low compared to competitive or HT standards.
    Of the 3 that I have had, there are some commonalities in them. All were very fast. All were "nervous" type dogs. Edgy, hyper, short attention span, liked to be doing something and they were all pacers in the kennel. All of these behaviors go to DNA I believe.
    It is unfortunate that they were spinners because all 3 showed a lot of positives in other areas.
    MP
    The pain of regret is much worse than the pain of hard work.

  9. #7
    Senior Member BJGatley's Avatar
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    Yep.. and the worst case is not only the spin, but barking as well.
    Sounds like some time off and let dog be a dog with no pressure.... maybe through a happy bumper now and then and watch their signs.
    My Penny.

  10. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by EdA View Post
    I am sad to tell you that this is an almost unsolvable problem, there are 2 others, people will tell you they have a remedy but rarely do any of those remedies work. If your dog spins in training you have a chance but not without the hands on assistance of a very experienced trainer with impecable timing.
    As Rex put it "if you caused it, you will probably not be able to fix it .. send it to me" ..It's the most difficult problem to fix once it becomes a problem ...Most do not recognize there is a problem until it is too late...I agree with ED..Steve S
    "Your dog learns as much by doing his work right,by your praise and encouragement, as he does by your displeasure and correction." DLWalters

  11. #9
    Senior Member BJGatley's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by steve schreiner View Post
    As Rex put it "if you caused it, you will probably not be able to fix it .. send it to me" ..It's the most difficult problem to fix once it becomes a problem ...Most do not recognize there is a problem until it is too late...I agree with ED..Steve S

    Yes Steve…
    IMO handlers or trainers to be require high expectations from their dogs through task management in a program…
    What they don’t know is the dog in their program thinking that all dogs are the same.
    There lies the problem…and the problem…
    My penny...

  12. #10
    Senior Member Wayne Nutt's Avatar
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    Dr Ed, What are the other two?
    Wayne Nutt
    Go Nutts with dog training

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