Heat stroke stroke scare. Be careful out there
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Thread: Heat stroke stroke scare. Be careful out there

  1. #1
    Senior Member bshaf's Avatar
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    Default Heat stroke stroke scare. Be careful out there

    To start off, my dog is ok...

    Yesterday, PA temps were high 80s with no breeze and more humid than usual.

    Got home around 5, fed the dogs and the wife and I ran a few errands, returned home around 8. I always train before feeding but didn't as I was going to give us a night off. When we got home, the yard was shaded and it was considerably cooler.

    Decided to do a quick wagon wheel, here-heel with me on the bucket, placed 8 bumpers. It was slow paced as I was working on him spinning with me. This drill lasted about 10 minutes (estimate) and at the end I "released" him to pick up a freebie which was laying off the the side, he walked to me and started heaving, and threw up 3 pieces of food, and then heaved again with nothing coming up. He laid in the cool grass and was panting, didn't seem too excessive but I noticed him gums were lighter than normal.

    We headed in the house which he walked perfectly at heel (not typical), head down and just seemed loopy. In the house I put them on the cold tile floor and he laid there panting, he would pant 5-8 breaths, then take a deep/struggling breath which I have never heard before...

    Gums were very pale, the breathing continued a couple minutes, and he wouldn't look up or lift his head at all. Wife ran out and started the truck with AC on high. With Huck laying on his side, I noticed his tail pointing out and he started going to the bathroom on the floor like he didn't know he was doing it (has never done that, even as a puppy).

    I knew something was seriously wrong, scooped him up and stood him up outside to finish, which he did go quite a bit and walked back to me but seemed off/wobbly/loopy. In the truck to the vet. At the vets office within 60 minutes of this starting.

    His symptoms improved the whole way, temp was 104, color on his gums had returned, and he was much more aware.

    X-ray revealed no torsion and no obstructions, just a little gas...

    For a dog who trains 4-5 days a week... It seems odd to me that a short/slow paced wagon wheel would cause this. Either way, be very careful with your pups out there.

    It was very fast and very scary.

    Brett
    Brett Shaffer

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  3. #2
    Senior Member swliszka's Avatar
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    1. Weight management. No fatties.
    2. Pre- conditioning. mandatory.
    3. Some dogs like humans are poor hot weather performers even with the above conditions met.
    4. 94 (Monday), 96 (Tuesday) and 91-95 today.
    5. 300 miles east of you.

  4. #3
    Senior Member bshaf's Avatar
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    Pre-conditioning - do you mean physical conditioning (running/roading) or not taking the dog from an air conditioned house outside to train without allowing them to acclimate?
    Brett Shaffer

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    Always important to consider the conditions (especially the humidity) during the summer months. I lost a 1.5 year old pup last year to a heat stroke. It was not training related and was a bit of a freak incident, but that doesn't ease the pain of losing a friend.
    White Oak's Take A Chance 6/19/2015 - 8/29/2016

  7. #5
    Senior Member swliszka's Avatar
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    My opinion is taking dogs from AC to outdoor extreme heat/humidity is an iffy So to me this means kenne lin shade with H2O, sun cover outdoors to adjust performance activities. Equally , dogs should be outside towards the fall to adjust for colder conditions (coat cover, etc.). Humidity is tough on animal and humans, ability to adjust is individual.

    Sunday high 80s no house AC
    Monday house no AC
    Tuesday house no AC until 6M with internal heat of 90 w/humidity. When turned to 75 , shut off and used fans.
    Today only fans until 85 or higher in house w/windows closed/shades drawn. Forecast worse humidity.

    I have had both AWS and Labs that could handle high humidity/temps and even with similar genetics others could not. One Open All Age FT stake started @ 97 degrees at 8 AM on land with one water dip. Just got hotter. Hydrate,
    Last edited by swliszka; 06-13-2017 at 10:29 AM.

  8. #6
    Senior Member ErinsEdge's Avatar
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    Drills can more stressful for dogs than marks and blinds, or getting into a battle over something. Back off in humid high temperatures.humid.jpg
    Nancy P



    "We give dogs time we can spare, space we can spare and love we can spare. And in return, dogs give us their all. It's the best deal man has ever made." M.Facklam

  9. #7

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    I'm glad your dog is fine Bshaf. Thanks for posting. I have seen my dog struggle lately as well. He stays inside and summers are always hot and humid here.

  10. #8
    Senior Member Hunt'EmUp's Avatar
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    Humidity is hard even for those dogs conditioned to it, still seems like he might've been a bit dehydrated to start. Will need to watch him to make sure it was only over-heating. Also keep some Alcohol around to put on foot pads and belly (helps with cooling), I keep ringer solution in my med bag, for subcutaneous fluid just in case.
    "They's Just DAWGS"; "I train dogs, Not papers"
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    Senior Member frontier's Avatar
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    I searched but couldn't find Dr. Nates Cooling thread. It used to be a sticky but had some useful and timely information especially given the heat and high humidity all across the U.S.
    Terrie Tomlinson


    HR Frontier's True Grit With a Cause "Rooster"
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    Member SWIPER's Avatar
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    First off you shouldn't train after you feed, especially with the heat. Food seems to digest slower IMO.
    I know how I feel after I eat in the heat.
    HRCH UH HEIDL'S MALLARD MACHINE MH 500 Point Club ( SWIPER )
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