Heat stroke stroke scare. Be careful out there - Page 2
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Thread: Heat stroke stroke scare. Be careful out there

  1. #11

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    We're in PA, too, though east of you. The humidity this week has been horrible. If we can't get out to train in the early morning, we don't train at all. Glad your dog is ok!

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  3. #12
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    On Monday I attended a lecture for a group of 12 PD K9 handler's put on by my vet. He is one of the main law enforcement K9 vets out here in Phoenix, and once of the topics he covered was heat stroke. The Dr advocated to taking your dogs temperature a few times a week to get them used to it and then recording a heat chart:

    Note the temp and humidity.
    Take your dog's resting temp.
    Run your dog through a brace or training session.
    Once the session is over, take your dog's temp and record it.
    Take your dog's temp every five minutes until it returns to normal range of 100-102.5


    According to the Dr, a normal healthy dog can return to normal range within 25 minutes. If it takes them much longer than that, something is wrong. The doctor also stated that when lowering your dog's temperature, stop at 103 degrees. If your dog is within heat stoke range, 106-109, and you drop their temp to 100 degrees, the shock can kill them.

    He also stated that at a certain point, subcutaneous fluid will not help the dog. The blood vessels become too constricted and water will not be absorbed fast enough. The Dr recommended the subQ fluids be used as prevention, IV as a emergency treatment.

    This are not my opinions, this is simply from the notes I took from that lecture. Keep in mind that he almost exclusevly sees working K9s in Arizona, he knows a thing or two about heat stroke.

    Hope this helps!
    Last edited by Pwechsler; 06-14-2017 at 09:33 AM.

  4. #13
    Senior Member hotel4dogs's Avatar
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    Also, be sure your dog gets enough fat in his diet. They need it in the hot weather, or they metabolize protein, which raises their body temperature 3-4 degrees and they are unable to cool down. 22% minimum in the heat.

    Barb Gibson
    with
    CH Rosewood Little Giant VCD3 UDX VER RA TDX MHU SH MXP MJP MFP T2BP DJ VCX WCX CCA CGC FFX-OG
    also UCH HR UH UUD NN UJJ URO1 UHIT
    (golden retriever) born 3-10-07
    a.k.a. "Tito", "The Tito Monster"
    www.GoTeamTito.com

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  6. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by frontier View Post
    I searched but couldn't find Dr. Nates Cooling thread. It used to be a sticky but had some useful and timely information especially given the heat and high humidity all across the U.S.
    Search heat stress
    Tom Dorroh
    Boston, GA

  7. #15
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    Also, most reported temps are in shade, not sun.
    Tom Dorroh
    Boston, GA

  8. #16
    Senior Member swliszka's Avatar
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    Iraq /Afghanistan K-2 dogs sold to the USMC were given subcutaneous fluids in combat areas. Still continues today in various high heat posted areas.

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