Advice on preparing for Qual
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Thread: Advice on preparing for Qual

  1. #1
    Senior Member Wayne Nutt's Avatar
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    Default Advice on preparing for Qual

    I am considering entering a qual this fall. I'm asking for suggestions in training. I have started by extending my hunt test setups in distance. Monday I got some of my white coat stuff out and did a partial FT setup. I know that i have to get my retired gun setup out and working. See video below of what i did on Monday. The fields were soaked out where the gun stations were located. On no. 1 I put out two wingers so i didn't rut up the fields so much. I was able to get to station 2 pretty good by staying on high ground.
    https://youtu.be/oO_7AsDPAss


    Wind was left to right on mark 1 and a tail wind on mark 2. Tail wind on blind 1 and wind right to left on blind 2.
    Last edited by Wayne Nutt; 05-08-2019 at 07:14 AM.
    Wayne Nutt
    Go Nutts with dog training

    HRCH Patton's Parker Co. Shadow "Shadow"
    HRCH Clineline Hijacker "Jack" RIP
    HRCH Marks a Lot Midnight Hudson, SH "Hudson" RIP (5/26/01-6/18/15)
    Castile Creeks Rawhide, MH "Rowdy"

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    Wayne, most of the failures I have seen when I have run Q's and judged them stemmed from:

    - A lack of willingness on the dog's part to look out past a shorter gun station and watch the longer bird all the way to the ground, resulting in a big hunt or failure on the longer bird.

    - The handler trying to win the trial on the blinds. Yes, you must address all the hazards, but perfection is not necessary, and can be a momentum killer that makes finishing the blind with style and precision very difficult.

    - Handlers working much too fast at the line, not making sure the dog has a good look at all the gun stations, and sending the dog before they re properly set and ready to be sent.

    Beyond that, don't dwell on only tight setups, and mix it up on a weekly basis, throwing a mix of singles, doubles and triples. You are probably doing this already.

    I hope you have some fun and success!-Paul
    there's no good reason to fatten up a retriever.

  4. #3
    Senior Member bamajeff's Avatar
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    Longer marks as you've stated. Long retired and short retired(I've had both in recent Qs). Long technical water blinds(thin entries/exits, multiple re-entries, down the shore re-entries, etc). Long land blinds.
    HRCH Laney's Chocolate Roux MH QAA
    HRCH Full Steam Coaltrain RIP

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  6. #4
    Senior Member EdA's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by paul young View Post
    Wayne, most of the failures I have seen when I have run Q's and judged them stemmed from:

    - A lack of willingness on the dog's part to look out past a shorter gun station and watch the longer bird all the way to the ground, resulting in a big hunt or failure on the longer bird.

    - The handler trying to win the trial on the blinds. Yes, you must address all the hazards, but perfection is not necessary, and can be a momentum killer that makes finishing the blind with style and precision very difficult.

    - Handlers working much too fast at the line, not making sure the dog has a good look at all the gun stations, and sending the dog before they re properly set and ready to be sent.

    Beyond that, don't dwell on only tight setups, and mix it up on a weekly basis, throwing a mix of singles, doubles and triples. You are probably doing this already.

    I hope you have some fun and success!-Paul
    All of that plus fliers or shackled birds at all distances and in different orders. Train on as many different properties as possible.

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    Senior Member ErinsEdge's Avatar
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    Paul and Ed right on especially Paul's first point "A lack of willingness on the dog's part to look out past a shorter gun station and watch the longer bird all the way to the ground, resulting in a big hunt or failure on the longer bird." I've seen well placed doubles wipe out cross-overs from hunt tests. I think training with real people in white or W drill helps
    Nancy P



    "We give dogs time we can spare, space we can spare and love we can spare. And in return, dogs give us their all. It's the best deal man has ever made." M.Facklam

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    Senior Member Wayne Nutt's Avatar
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    Thanks everyone. Our tech water is pretty limited now that Ackermans is not available. But we still have some at Fishers. On my training grounds we have about 20 ponds. Not very many are big.

    Paul yesterday I did a hunt test setup. One mark at 150 yards left to right. Another mark at 200 yards right to left (holding blinds were almost in line but not quite). Is this what you were talking about or should the first gun be closer?277D5862-D4A8-4DB2-99EE-757EA765A678.jpg
    Last edited by Wayne Nutt; 05-08-2019 at 08:33 AM.
    Wayne Nutt
    Go Nutts with dog training

    HRCH Patton's Parker Co. Shadow "Shadow"
    HRCH Clineline Hijacker "Jack" RIP
    HRCH Marks a Lot Midnight Hudson, SH "Hudson" RIP (5/26/01-6/18/15)
    Castile Creeks Rawhide, MH "Rowdy"

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    Senior Member fishduck's Avatar
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    It has been some time since I ran a Q. A dog that was willing to look past the short flyer station and find the "guy in the dirty t-shirt" deep always made it to the blinds.
    Mark Land

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    The vertical separation is fine. I think for training purposes you might want more horizontal separation so that it's easier for you to read when/if the dog's focus shifts off of the long bird to the shorter one. Every once in a while you can set up a tight look as a test of the how your training is progressing.

    As Ed said, flyers short of the long bird are a serious distraction. One way to encourage the dog to look long is to use shackled birds on the long mark a good percentage of the time.-Paul
    there's no good reason to fatten up a retriever.

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    Quote Originally Posted by fishduck View Post
    It has been some time since I ran a Q. A dog that was willing to look past the short flyer station and find the "guy in the dirty t-shirt" deep always made it to the blinds.
    Amen to that.

    I think it is toughest if the order is R, M retired, F or the same thing going left to right. The dog's tendency is to swing right past the middle bird to the flyer. Even if the gun stations are well separated and visibility is good, that's a tough setup.-Paul
    there's no good reason to fatten up a retriever.

  12. #10

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    If possible approach the line walking toward the longest or most difficult gun to pick out. Take your time, let the dog pick out the guns and settle in on the line.
    There will probably be a flier in the first series land marks and likely in a position to distract from the other guns.
    Expect water marks to be cheaty and entry may be long.
    There may or may not be retired guns but be prepared for it. More than one mark will surely be positioned so the dog loses sight of it in route while other guns are remain visible.

    The land blind may be run right after the marks and the line very tight to a gun.
    Identify corridor to the blinds and any "goal posts" or other factors. There will probably be factors that tend to pull the dog out of your line of sight.
    Watch the test dog and if possible some dogs that run before you. Be prepared to handle, whistle in mouth and lungs full. If you hesitate it's probably too late.
    If you are offended by what is said, ask yourself, is it because it was true?

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