Black lab aggressiveness?
The RetrieverTraining.Net Forums The Retriever Academy
Total Retriever Training with Mike Lardy
Hawkeye Media Gunners Up Tritronics Wildear
Retriever Coach
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 17

Thread: Black lab aggressiveness?

  1. #1

    Default Black lab aggressiveness?

    Has anyone had a lab that showed aggression towards kids? I have a 1yr old black Male that has recently came back from the trainer. Hes been great with my kids ( 15yr old girl and 11yr old boy) and my nephews, but hes snapped at a couple of their friends. Both times it was 10 yr old boys. Anyone dealt with this before?

  2. Remove Advertisements
    RetrieverTraining.net
    Advertisements
     

  3. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    73

    Default

    I have one almost 4 years old that is aggressive towards other puppies and small children. I do not place 100 percent of blame on her shoulders. Long story behind her upbringing. She was very sick when we brought her home and due to that she was not able to be properly socialized as a puppy. Neither puppies or little children know to stay out of anyone's face and she does not like either of these in her face and is quick to let them know this. It's an easy fix for us, she stays in her kennel when either is around.

  4. #3
    Senior Member swampcollielover's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    MO
    Posts
    3,434

    Default

    I had a field bred Golden Retriever that showed aggressive behaviors at an early age. The breeder said it was not aggression, but just that he was a dog bred to have lots of drive! I beleived her because she was a vet/teacher and a large Texas University vet school. After the dog matured his aggression increased. We took him to a trainer who 'was said' to be good with dogs like this! When we got him back he was well trained for the field, but he would bite the tar out of you if you touched anywhere around his front chest. I found that out at the hospital! We kept him isolated when people where around visiting us. By the time he was five his problems continue to worsen. We took him to a dog phycologist who specialized in aggression in dogs. In one brief session our dog darn near attacked the doggie doctor.

    He told us that there were two basic types of aggression, the type he had could not be controlled or trained out of him. We had the dog put down!

    Be careful...Good Luck
    Last edited by swampcollielover; 06-15-2019 at 11:22 AM.

  5. Remove Advertisements
    RetrieverTraining.net
    Advertisements
     

  6. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Chewelah, WA
    Posts
    1,514

    Default

    CHECK THE THYROID!!! Early onset low thyroid can cause aggressiveness, anxiety and other odd behaviors.

    To Swampcollielover, Goldens are notorious for thyroid problems. If it is thyroid, no training techniques will help the situation. It is a chemical imbalance that only gets worse with time.

    Meredith

  7. #5
    Senior Member Labs R Us's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,127

    Default

    I had a black lab that at five months of age started showing aggression when he had certain items that he did not want to give up (resource guarding). I had him neutered at that time thinking it would help the issue but it did not.

    Thankfully he was never like this out in the field with birds and I earned an MH title on him. He was an extremely talented dog.

    One evening at home after having a great day of training in the field, he had his favorite toy, a tennis ball. I tried to have him give it to me but he wouldn’t and he became more and more aggressive. I managed to get him in his kennel in the car with the tennis ball in his mouth. I could not get near the crate without him getting extremely aggressive.

    The next morning I thought he would have settled down but he was still very agitated and aggressive. At that point I made a video of his behavior and drove to the vet. It was at that time we made the difficult, gut-wrenching decision to put him down. He was only five years old. At times, when I second-guess my decision, I am glad I have that video to watch.

    PS: Dang, I wish I would’ve known about this earlier, Meredith.
    Last edited by Labs R Us; 06-10-2019 at 09:16 AM. Reason: Added PS.
    Becky
    Life is Good . . . Do what you like - Like what you do.

  8. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    76

    Default

    agree with mwk56 CHECK THE THYROID! . Thyroid problems can cause aggressiveness, but, the thyroid levels can be controlled with medication. And, it is not expensive. We have had these problems in Goldens and in Labs. Good Luck

  9. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Chewelah, WA
    Posts
    1,514

    Default

    I would strongly suggest anyone who has a dog with a change in behavior have a full thyroid panel run. The other aspect is that many GP veterinarians are not aware of this phenomenon and will think a borderline low is "normal" but it is not!! Push for the blood test and educate your veterinarian! Hemopet in CA has developed normal range thyroid numbers by breed and can help figure out what dosage your dog needs to be under control. My afflicted dog also takes cannabis every day to help make him sweet and a dog we can live with again.

    Meredith

  10. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Montana
    Posts
    978

    Default

    Not only thyroid, but other health issues. A vet check should be the first thing you do with any behavior change. My Llewellyn attacked a dog that he knew well for no apparent reason. They have met up in open space frequently. Turns out his cervical vertebrae are undersized and he'd twisted his neck, pinching a nerve and causing a considerable amount of pain. This only showed up after he tweaked the neck. Treatment cured the issue completely and he's back to normal - thank heavens
    Chuck

  11. #9
    Senior Member ErinsEdge's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    SE Wisconsin
    Posts
    7,632

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mwk56 View Post
    I would strongly suggest anyone who has a dog with a change in behavior have a full thyroid panel run. The other aspect is that many GP veterinarians are not aware of this phenomenon and will think a borderline low is "normal" but it is not!! Push for the blood test and educate your veterinarian! Hemopet in CA has developed normal range thyroid numbers by breed and can help figure out what dosage your dog needs to be under control. My afflicted dog also takes cannabis every day to help make him sweet and a dog we can live with again.

    Meredith
    Thank you for promoting testing Meredith. That's really sad that some vets or pet psychologists don't know about doing a thyroid paneland exam first. I have seen aggression and I have also seen a Golden with an Open win's marking fall off dramatically and I suggested to the latter to do a thyroid panel and once medicated his field work improved dramatically although he never titled.
    Nancy P



    "We give dogs time we can spare, space we can spare and love we can spare. And in return, dogs give us their all. It's the best deal man has ever made." M.Facklam

  12. #10
    Senior Member DarrinGreene's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Souf Joisy
    Posts
    5,052

    Default

    Always recommend a thorough vet exam including thyroid and other bloodwork before training with aggression issues.

    There are usually a lot of lower level symptoms people aren't seeing before actual aggression occurs.
    Darrin Greene

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •