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Thread: Lawn mushrooms

  1. #1
    Senior Member Labs R Us's Avatar
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    Default Lawn mushrooms

    This very wet spring has brought an abundance of mushrooms to my yard. Iím concerned my lab will ingest them and Iím not sure if they are poisonous or not. They are mostly near an area that had a tree at one time in my front yard. Now Iíve noticed some in my backyard tho. I try to keep my lawn open to sunshine and dry but weíve been getting rain every other day so the ground doesnít have time to dry out.

    Any suggestions to get rid of these mushrooms would be appreciated as Iím getting paranoid about letting my 14 month old pup out in my yard.
    Becky
    Life is Good . . . Do what you like - Like what you do.

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  3. #2
    Senior Member PalouseDogs's Avatar
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    Default

    The mushrooms you see aren't the main part of the fungus. The fungus growing underground (usually living on some sort of decaying matter, but sometimes on something living) is composed of fine filaments called a mycelial mass. The mushrooms you see are structures designed to get the spores above ground where they can be carried by the wind and deposited elsewhere to maybe grow a new fungus. Too much information?

    The point is, trying to to kill the above-ground mushrooms is like trying to kill a plant by clipping its flowers off. You'd have to try to kill the mycelial mass underground, which would likely take way more poison than you'd want to put on your lawn. If the mushrooms are appearing where you had a tree, possibly the fungus is growing on the decaying roots.

    Anyway, the good news is that most mushrooms aren't poisonous. You could try to find out what they are. There are some online guides to mushrooms ID. I think there are also some web sites with people that try to ID insects, plants, mushrooms, etc., from photos, but it can be difficult to see some of the important features from a photo. At best, you might be able to eliminate some of the most toxic ones as possibilities. As a last resort, you could try to find a mycologist (fungus expert) at one of the universities in your area and see if he/she can help.

    Another avenue (probably more practical) is to talk to a local vet that's been around your area for a while. Ask if they see cases of mushroom poisoning and, if so, what the dangerous mushrooms look like.
    Kelly Cassidy (person)

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  4. #3
    Senior Member Labs R Us's Avatar
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    Default

    Thanks for the info Kelly!

    Quote Originally Posted by PalouseDogs View Post
    The mushrooms you see aren't the main part of the fungus. The fungus growing underground (usually living on some sort of decaying matter, but sometimes on something living) is composed of fine filaments called a mycelial mass. The mushrooms you see are structures designed to get the spores above ground where they can be carried by the wind and deposited elsewhere to maybe grow a new fungus. Too much information?

    The point is, trying to to kill the above-ground mushrooms is like trying to kill a plant by clipping its flowers off. You'd have to try to kill the mycelial mass underground, which would likely take way more poison than you'd want to put on your lawn. If the mushrooms are appearing where you had a tree, possibly the fungus is growing on the decaying roots.

    Anyway, the good news is that most mushrooms aren't poisonous. You could try to find out what they are. There are some online guides to mushrooms ID. I think there are also some web sites with people that try to ID insects, plants, mushrooms, etc., from photos, but it can be difficult to see some of the important features from a photo. At best, you might be able to eliminate some of the most toxic ones as possibilities. As a last resort, you could try to find a mycologist (fungus expert) at one of the universities in your area and see if he/she can help.

    Another avenue (probably more practical) is to talk to a local vet that's been around your area for a while. Ask if they see cases of mushroom poisoning and, if so, what the dangerous mushrooms look like.
    Becky
    Life is Good . . . Do what you like - Like what you do.

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