Tricupsid Valve Dysplasia
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Thread: Tricupsid Valve Dysplasia

  1. #1
    Senior Member Aussie's Avatar
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    Default Tricupsid Valve Dysplasia

    There have recently been two articles in the US, Retriever News, on TVD.

    A couple of years ago, I went to a large Labrador retriever colony breeding establishment health conference, where TVD was discussed openly (as some breeding studs and dams were found when echoed, had the condition). They did not consider TVD widespread in their breeding colony.

    The cardiologists confused me, as one thought the trait dominant, one recessive. Two geneticists suggested we don't have to worry about the condition as multiple genes are involved, and considered rare.

    What are your thoughts?

    Should all breeding stock especially studs have clear echocardiograms?
    Good story! Show me your dogs.

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  3. #2
    Senior Member ErinsEdge's Avatar
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    I would suspect there is a question on inheritance here also, (can it just be congenital?) and even though Bridget keeps telling us there are "numerous in field lines, I have yet to hear of any big field studs nor are they on OFA. I have done my own stud and I would tend to look at those studs that have had them done for breeding purposes, but that's where we are. There are still a number of studs that don't have PRA clearances nor even elbows and people still breed to them based on performance records.
    Nancy P



    "We give dogs time we can spare, space we can spare and love we can spare. And in return, dogs give us their all. It's the best deal man has ever made." M.Facklam

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    Senior Member IdahoLabs's Avatar
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    TVD is definitely a problem....maybe not a huge problem, but it is a problem in field trial dogs. I heard of a field trial litter recently where three of the pups have been diagnosed with mild or moderate TVD. I know of several others and all nice FT pedigrees. There's a TVD in Labradors group on Facebook I'd suggest joining, if you're a social media person.

    The mode of inheritance is uncertain and there is not a genetic test yet (although NCSU is doing research) so testing is the best option we have at this time.

    I do echo all my bitches and I have all pups checked by echo before placement.
    ​~Your decisions are only as good as the information you base them on~

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  6. #4
    Senior Member Hunt'EmUp's Avatar
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    Heart issues suck. My experience (limited) I have seen 2 dogs with heart issues, not sure if it was TVD. Both showed mild symptoms and had mild episodes (~5yrs). Both went to the vet, one there was a murmur; the vet echoed the heart found the issue; didn't really help with the outcome; dog died, after being allowed to play in the yard. The other dog, the vet did blood test etc. couldn't really find anything, they didn't look into the heart as after a couple of days he recovered. The dog was normal for 6-8mts, then after a day of working, was found dead in his crate no apparent reason. It was enough that I check my dogs heart and get their clearances; it used to be a standard test that everyone did; but has seemed to drop off. There might be some truth to the belief it is was a big issue in performance stock we would be see it, problem is you really don't want to see it. Heart issues doesn't seem to have a good outcome for working dogs, no matter what you do they are going to be active.
    "They's Just DAWGS"; "I train dogs, Not papers"
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    Senior Member ErinsEdge's Avatar
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    I found the thread on TVD from 2012 and the "list" of affected field individuals. Nothing new. This was asked in 2012 "So are you going to tell us the lines.... so we can be aware???" and the answer was "everywhere". Well that is no help to those of us who are willing to test. A little hint would be good where to start in pure field lines. Just saying.
    Nancy P



    "We give dogs time we can spare, space we can spare and love we can spare. And in return, dogs give us their all. It's the best deal man has ever made." M.Facklam

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    Senior Member North Mountain's Avatar
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    I recently had a pup diagnosed with mild TVD. It was diagnosed with an advanced cardiac exam by a cardiologist. The dog has no symptoms and likely never will since his condition is mild. There is no murmur and without an echo it never would have been caught. He was going to be my next stud dog. He's chocolate factored but from a black pedigree. He would have been a great outcross to every chocolate line out there. His sire is a well known National Field Champion and his dam is from well known field trial lines. She is QAA. He has at least one littermate that is confirmed moderate and will need to be retired. We absolutely need to start testing our breeding stock and especially those popular stud dogs. I kind of think it may be recessive just a gut feeling after looking at pedigrees of known affected dogs. Hopefully they can develope a DNA test but till then the OFA Advanced Cardiac Clearance is the gold standard. Start asking for it!
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    Senior Member HarryWilliams's Avatar
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    I did the heart exam. But now will do the Echo. Can we start a sticky where people can post results with Pedigree so we know more about TVD inheritability?
    "Sometimes we just gotta do what is right". Jerry 2006

    See ya in the field. HPW http://www.sagaciouskennel.com/

  10. #8
    Senior Member ErinsEdge's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HarryWilliams View Post
    I did the heart exam. But now will do the Echo. Can we start a sticky where people can post results with Pedigree so we know more about TVD inheritability?
    I think it's a good idea. All you are saying is sire + dam is clear or affected. Since we don't know the inheritance we are not saying who is the cause, but it will give people a chance to do the test, and maybe avoid sinking a bunch of money into a puppy. Maybe we can list clinics.We have to start somewhere. No witch hunts. Secrets aren't helping anyone.Maybe some of the stud dog owners will Echo their dogs. Fred Kampo did his two dogs and put them on OFA. BTW, if you have your dog done at a clinic, OFA only charges $7.
    Nancy P



    "We give dogs time we can spare, space we can spare and love we can spare. And in return, dogs give us their all. It's the best deal man has ever made." M.Facklam

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    Senior Member windycanyon's Avatar
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    Here are 2 very good resources: https://www.ofa.org/health-clinics and http://cavalierhealth.org/health_clinics.htm#Table_1 . Be sure to look for echo option as the auscultation alone is missing something like 20% according to the cardiologist who does our local clinics (in fact he will no longer give a breeding clearance to a lab w/o a clear echo). Also, the board cert'd cardiologists are the only ones who can do the OFA Advanced cardiac clearance. Anne

  12. #10
    Senior Member windycanyon's Avatar
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    Minor clarification here: the clinic must be listed on the OFA site to get the kennel rate stickers ($7.50 / dog). I'd also like to see a sticky here for Advanced Cardiac testing!

    Quote Originally Posted by ErinsEdge View Post
    I think it's a good idea. All you are saying is sire + dam is clear or affected. Since we don't know the inheritance we are not saying who is the cause, but it will give people a chance to do the test, and maybe avoid sinking a bunch of money into a puppy. Maybe we can list clinics.We have to start somewhere. No witch hunts. Secrets aren't helping anyone.Maybe some of the stud dog owners will Echo their dogs. Fred Kampo did his two dogs and put them on OFA. BTW, if you have your dog done at a clinic, OFA only charges $7.

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