Advice on buying a digital camera.
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Thread: Advice on buying a digital camera.

  1. #1
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    Default Advice on buying a digital camera.

    I plan on buying a digital camera in the next three months or so, but I know very little about them. I'm hoping for some advice on what I should be looking for and some info on what digital cameras are capable of. Most have their megapixels in big, shiny letters, but is that a reliable mark of quality? What other specs should I be looking for when choosing a camera ?
    I've also been wondering how digital cameras behave compared to old-fashioned film cameras. Is it possible to adjust depth of field with a digital camera? Do they have the equivalent of f-numbers for fine-tuning exposures? Do they have the option to take pictures in grey scale or high-contrast black-and-white?

    If anyone feels like recommending specific cameras, I'm looking for something that mimics my mom's old Cannon SLR camera. Something more than a point-and-shoot, but nothing over-elaborate or expensive. I'd like to have the ability to fine-tune my pictures like in the previous paragraph. I'm not interested in video. I'd hope to get something under $300 if possible.

    Last edited by johncina19; 10-17-2019 at 02:29 AM.

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  3. #2
    Junior Member NickJ2812's Avatar
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    My friend is into photography, he's got Canon EOS 80D. I'm not the professional but the quality is pretty good. It's also lightweight so it's easy to take on a trip.

  4. #3
    Senior Member Mountain Duck's Avatar
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    The good news is "yes" today's Digital SLR cameras offer all the "adjustments" of your traditional SLR film cameras. Depth of field (aperture) and shutter speed can all be set manually if desired. As for the gray scale B/w options, some cameras do offer "in camera" options for this. However, these edits are best done with a photo processing program on a computer. You can do basically anything to a digital photo with an editing program. If you shoot in RAW, you can adjust exposure and white balance easily.

    The bad news is $300 will severely limit you. Depending on the style of shooting you're looking to do, you'll have to buy a couple different lenses....probably. You might look at the used market, or refurbished market. Try B&H photo online. Also, if your mom still has her Canon camera/lenses, they may still be compatible with a new Digital SLR. I shoot Nikon, and am not real familiar with Canon compatibility.
    Wildlife and Outdoor Photography

    http://www.ericrutherford.net

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  6. #4
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    I used a Canon AE-1 for years - a film camera. The lenses don't work for the EOS 30D (precursor of the 80D by several models) or the 7D I went to. The 80D, though, would be a fine camera and let you shoot both automatically and with as much control as you want with speed and f stop.

    I traded in my 30D to cameraland in NY when I bought the 7D. Mountain Duck's advice about a used camera is good.

    You can shoot jpegs or raw or both if I remember my 30D. B/W and grayscale are possible. The pros use the raw files which improved their ability to post-process - digitally edit the files.
    Chuck

  7. #5
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    Not a true SLR but much more than a point and shoot. I got a Canon Powershot SX40HS. It takes very nice photos, is pretty adjustable and is compact enough to take hunting. I put the padded case in a small dry bag. It has a 35x optical zoom which makes a big difference when framing a pic. I do wish I could do a manual focus as it gets a little finicky with thee auto focus some times. But overall for my needs it takes really nice pics. One of my pics took an editors choice award from Delta Waterfowl a few years back.
    Just another option.
    Nate Baxter, DVM
    Clarksville, OH

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