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Thread: 300 yard plus blinds?

  1. #81
    Senior Member Mark Littlejohn's Avatar
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    To the OP (if you're still around...)
    I consider running extra long blinds the same way Ben Hogan viewed hitting a golf ball 300 yards (was probably 200 yds in his day, but that game has evolved, too).
    He said something like: "You may not need it often, but you know you've got it in the bag if you ever do".
    Last edited by Mark Littlejohn; 10-20-2019 at 11:49 PM.

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  3. #82
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    Depending on how you train, I think you end up traiing what that dog does in the video out of a dog. Granted, I haven’t even watched the video. I don’t train it out of the dog myself but I am a dog whisperer, ha, ha.

    Mike Lardy himself says in a video that the dogs learn to not take an over. I am sure I am misquoting him to a degree but the phenomenon does exist and it is mentioned. That could be a reason not to teach 300 yard blinds like everyone does it if you focus on hunting. I would say that if a dog can’t take an over that is also a sign of lack of control. That is obviously true in the literal sense. If a dog doesn’t do what is asked, you aren’t controlling the dog. It just doesn’t go along with game as it is played.

    Granted, I know little. But .... it seems ironic that the question is whether to teach something that untrains what is shown in a video as an example as the end result.

  4. #83
    Senior Member ErinsEdge's Avatar
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    Puppies (meaning dogs under a year) can learn to do long sight blinds. I had a rather new Lab owner, come over with his dog from his son bred to my stud who at 9 months was telling me his dog was already doing long blinds, especially up hill. He explained how the trainer taught him. I respectfully explained he might want to look for a trainer who had an established program and why. He did, he went on to earn an MH and MN plates. Some dogs can line very well. Big difference of a blind negotiating obstacles and one up a hill done over and over.

    https://vimeo.com/287115601?fbclid=I...rLXPbWQEa2MLrY
    Last edited by ErinsEdge; 10-21-2019 at 11:19 AM.
    Nancy P



    "We give dogs time we can spare, space we can spare and love we can spare. And in return, dogs give us their all. It's the best deal man has ever made." M.Facklam

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  6. #84
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    I guess someone can tell me if this is true or not:

    When blinds are easy, a dog that holds a tight line is all that is needed to keep it out of trouble.

    When blinds are hard, the dog needs to be able to change direction when it gets in trouble

    When a blind is near impossible, the dog needs some independence to pull the cat out of the bag.

    It seems like it must be true. Some people want to follow rules. Some people dream of pulling a cat out of a bag however remote. A cat is beautiful creature if even in a dream?

  7. #85

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    Quote Originally Posted by psduckman View Post
    I do hunt and y'all have talked me into it!! I'm sure they are going to struggle! I'm thinking of teaching them in sections like I did when starting blind training. What do you think?
    The OP was convinced about training on long blinds in post 5.
    The reward for working on long blinds (and marks) will be a more confident, more obedient, better handling retriever with a great training attitude.
    I also believe a happy retriever is a retriever that is both challenged and successful in training.
    "I'm thankful someone stood up to him, even if it was a woman." Franco 10/18/19

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