British vs. American bred Labs for AKC retriever hunt tests - Page 2
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Thread: British vs. American bred Labs for AKC retriever hunt tests

  1. #11
    Senior Member HarryWilliams's Avatar
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    Besides being different what's the difference?
    "Sometimes we just gotta do what is right". Jerry 2006

    See ya in the field. HPW http://www.sagaciouskennel.com/

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  3. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by HarryWilliams View Post
    Besides being different what's the difference?
    This is not a can of worms that should be opened. Trust me.
    Last edited by Mark S; 11-17-2019 at 09:25 PM.

  4. #13
    Senior Member Sabireley's Avatar
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    Do you mean British FT lines or US bred show dog that many refer to as British? If the parents don’t have a proven record of success in the game you want to play, then I would steer clear.

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  6. #14
    Senior Member Breck's Avatar
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    If you want to play HT or FT with a dog from British FT lines you will likely be disappointed. I only really know FT's and as far as I know not a single Labrador from a British FT breeding (like in last 30 years or more) has accomplished anything of note in Field Trials. A few had derby points and few (one I can remember) made QAA. Probably no QA2. As far as all age stakes, forget about it, maybe you could find a dog or two who jammed an AA stake but good luck finding any who placed.
    Anyway if you're okay with a so so dog for HT's go for it. Be aware that most British breeders in the US do not compete or run HT or do anything to prove their brood bitches are worthy of breeding.
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  7. #15
    Senior Member cmccallum's Avatar
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    You should be able to find a british dog that can play the hunt test game no problem.

  8. #16
    Senior Member crackerd's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Breck View Post
    If you want to play HT or FT with a dog from British FT lines you will likely be disappointed. I only really know FT's and as far as I know not a single Labrador from a British FT breeding (like in last 30 years or more) has accomplished anything of note in Field Trials. A few had derby points and few (one I can remember) made QAA. Probably no QA2. As far as all age stakes, forget about it, maybe you could find a dog or two who jammed an AA stake but good luck finding any who placed.
    Anyway if you're okay with a so so dog for HT's go for it. Be aware that most British breeders in the US do not compete or run HT or do anything to prove their brood bitches are worthy of breeding.
    For FTs, depends on one's expectations, Breck. Mine with a British dog (by way of Nebraska) were having a great dog to work with on the Zen of retriever training (various training groups) and competing on occasion. Fulfilled my expectations completely albeit from a longshot perspective that admittedly wouldn't have satisfied lots of other "truer" competitors. Though I got one of those QAA thingies along the way with her - way along the way, at almost 10 years old, but I can also that she went 5+ years without any running trials, and only ran a few after that, which was my decision. But also can say that at 16 months, owner-handler trained, she went seven of eight series in a Q and an Amateur and wasn't being carried by the judges for her manners, looks, or crooked smile...

    HTs, a different story with a British dog, and could be a good story for somebody wanting to train their own retriever for competition and getting in with an "American Lab" hunt test training group. Actually, I think Dawson's (DH) testimonial to Mr. Combs could be downright enticing to somebody wanting to try a British Lab in those games. I'm also thinking that Kirk Keene at Imperial Retrievers out of Illinois is breeding British Labs with hunt test success at the highest levels in mind.

    Funny thing is I've now got the antithesis of a British Lab (a Lean Mac yearling through and through) to play and work with, and my old British gal, now almost 12, is giving her all she wants on both fronts helping "raise her right" as a canine good citizen with at least some semblance of civility.

    MG

  9. #17
    Senior Member Hunt'EmUp's Avatar
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    So I have had experience with one Truly British Lab out of "British Field stock FC-FC etc."; She was imported directly from England and had KC paperwork. I have no idea how the owner actually got the dog; friend of a friend, brother, uncle, cousin; type of deal. She was pretty much the same and trained the same as an American lab. Only issue is she tended to be a bit softer and had little bottom. But then that could've been just this dog. That Said I have had exposure to several " what they call British dogs". Namely they came from kennel advertising "British lines" and I believe they might've been out of a British line at some point; but their paperwork doesn't actually show any KC registration numbers nor British field titles for generations. They are pretty much just the same as many American bred dogs. Different dogs from particular Kennels tended to have some quirks " less drive than I like, and a bit stubborn IMO" ; but I feel that is more the kennel line; and not "British Breeding". Not sure I would go out of my way to find a truly "British dog" when to me the Good British dogs are just the same as a Good American dogs. Now I will say when look at Labs in general different lines have different energy levels; and that is pretty much all about particular dog type; not nationality. It is completely possible to find a well manner less driven dog without it having to be British; might look into HRC or HT lines. If you start looking just for "British" you really limit your options; and "unless you are going to import directly which is a Major PITA; most likely the dog would just be "British" lines which could be several generations back.
    Last edited by Hunt'EmUp; 11-18-2019 at 01:29 PM.
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  10. #18
    Senior Member lucas's Avatar
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    Thank you Huntemup, for the only knowledgeable post in the thread. Unless you import directly from England, you have an American bred Labrador Retriever. There are surely different body styles here, as there are in other countries.
    Tell me, are YOU American? Or British?
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  11. #19
    Senior Member cmccallum's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lucas View Post
    Thank you Huntemup, for the only knowledgeable post in the thread. Unless you import directly from England, you have an American bred Labrador Retriever. There are surely different body styles here, as there are in other countries.
    Tell me, are YOU American? Or British?
    False. I have two I bought here in the states, sire and dam of both have KC registration and all generations behind them. There are kennels here in the states that imports studs and dams directly from the UK. I agree that if I was to breed mine, they would technically be "American bred". Those who know the pedigrees, know different.

  12. #20
    Senior Member crackerd's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cmccallum View Post
    False. I have two I bought here in the states, sire and dam of both have KC registration and all generations behind them. There are kennels here in the states that imports studs and dams directly from the UK. I agree that if I was to breed mine, they would technically be "American bred". Those who know the pedigrees, know different.
    No, not necessarily false, just sorta somewhere between doctrinaire and semantics. Kind of funny that several of Ms. Lucas' confreres on the LRC BOD - past and present - and their "associates" ask from time to time how my "British Lab" is making out. (I put it in quotes to emphasize for her inference that yes, she's American-bred. ...then again, I had a MH Sussex spaniel bitch that was "British-bred" - came over in-utero - and I didn't cotton to calling her an American Sussex spaniel, not a'tall.)

    MG

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