For a casual weekend bird hunter, a few questions.
The RetrieverTraining.Net Forums The Retriever Academy
Total Retriever Training with Mike Lardy
Hawkeye Media Gunners Up Tritronics Wildear
Retriever Coach
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 14

Thread: For a casual weekend bird hunter, a few questions.

  1. #1
    Junior Member Vance_kaz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Posts
    16

    Default

    Start with some books and videos im a lardy fan
    Then go find a decent breeding maybe a MH to a SH and your journey will begin make sure hips, elbows,eyes and EIC tests have been done

  2. Remove Advertisements
    RetrieverTraining.net
    Advertisements
     

  3. #2
    Senior Member The Snows's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    1,780

    Default

    As to your pros & cons ...... wrong and wrong!

    Any dog breeding which is too active for the house and home means you as a trainer did not do your job in your obedience training in setting limits as to what is acceptable house / yard behaviour. My FT bred dog is sitting sleeping at my feet as I write this!

    Working Retrievers actually have better health clearances in the fact that those who are breeding for field work realize that as well as hips, elbows and eyes, CNM and EIC are also very important .... confirmation breeders not so much.

    Look for a breeding where you can see working titles in the pedigree - FC, AFC, FTCH, AFTCH, MH or QA2 ..... note CH in front of the dogs name is a show title and not a field title.

    As for training materials you have lots of options depending on puppy or advanced training DVD's - Jackie Mertins, Bill Hillman, Mike Larry, Evan Graham, Chris Akin, Rick Stawski.

    Good luck and have fun!
    NMH GMH GMHR-V HRCH-UH Dakota Creek's Royal Navigator MH (HRC & NAHRA 500 PT Clubs)
    HRCH-UH MHR-I Dakota Creek's Royal Gem MH
    HRCH-UH WR Dakota Creek's Wreaking Havoc SH
    SHR UH Dakota Creek's Cute As A Bug JH WC
    MHR Pine Acre's Dakota Sand Creek SH WCI (2003-2017)

  4. #3
    Senior Member Don Smith's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Johnstown, OH
    Posts
    1,305

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by The Snows View Post
    As to your pros & cons ...... wrong and wrong!

    Any dog breeding which is too active for the house and home means you as a trainer did not do your job in your obedience training in setting limits as to what is acceptable house / yard behaviour. My FT bred dog is sitting sleeping at my feet as I write this!

    Working Retrievers actually have better health clearances in the fact that those who are breeding for field work realize that as well as hips, elbows and eyes, CNM and EIC are also very important .... confirmation breeders not so much.

    Look for a breeding where you can see working titles in the pedigree - FC, AFC, FTCH, AFTCH, MH or QA2 ..... note CH in front of the dogs name is a show title and not a field title.

    As for training materials you have lots of options depending on puppy or advanced training DVD's - Jackie Mertins, Bill Hillman, Mike Larry, Evan Graham, Chris Akin, Rick Stawski.

    Good luck and have fun!
    ^^^^^^^
    This!
    Also, I don't know what an "ordinary" Lab is. If you're referring to a "backyard breeding", beware. If, with regard to a pup's abilities, if the only reference to sire and dam is that they are "great hunting dogs", I don't know what that means. The "breeder's" evaluation of a "great hunting dog" may be far below what many would consider to be great.
    HRCH Meglyn's Maramaxx Daisycutter MH-30 (Daisy)
    SHR Meglyn's Eye on the Prize JH (Molly)
    Meglyn's Timbrhuntn ValleyGirl (Lilly)
    Meglyn's Prime Time to Leave Me Lucille SH (Lucy)
    Meglyn's Lionheart MH (Little Guy)
    Meglyn-Firemark's I am NOT a Lab SH (Goldie)
    Meglyn's Lil Miss Sureshot SH CGCA(Annie)
    In memory of Chevy, HR Meglyn's Silverado Slim SH, July 20, 2006, HR Meglyn's Blue Ridge Belle MH, July 19, 2008 and HRCH Meglyn's Honest Abe MH, Aug 9, 2013.

    www.meglynretrievers.com

  5. Remove Advertisements
    RetrieverTraining.net
    Advertisements
     

  6. #4
    Senior Member fishduck's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    nowhere Alabama
    Posts
    2,054

    Default

    Let me give you a different spin on your question. Why bother with the crap shoot of a puppy. You may spend the next 2 years of your life finding out that the puppy you purchased does not fit your needs. Could be a breeding issue, training issue or any number of personality conflicts. Instead look for an older started dog. The cost will be more initially but you will spend much more getting a dog to that level. You can watch the dog work and see how it interacts with you before you purchase.
    Mark Land

  7. #5
    Senior Member drunkenpoacher's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Posts
    1,400

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jonah Fitzsimmons View Post
    For a casual weekend bird hunter, can an "ordinary" Labrador or Golden retriever get it done with the right training?


    There's pros and cons I keep hearing.

    -field bred dogs are too active for house or yard pets
    -show bred dogs have better health certifications


    I mainly want a dog for companionship and for long life and good canine health. Hunting talent is secondary in importance to me as long as he can pick up the doves, the ducks and the pheasant without damaging the quarry and promptly return the fowl to my hand.

    How does one become an amateur trainer to work their own puppy from litter to a finished gun dog? Is there a good book or video kit I can purchase for the DIY retriever trainer?
    Do I absolutely have to buy a dog with field trials titles on its pedigree? I'm not looking for a Rolls-Royce grade dog but just a good "Ford pickup truck" dog that gets it done with some good work on my own part. Will a Master Hunter or Field Champion dog really be a lousy companion pet for a typical 3-br home in the suburbs?
    What you are hearing must be coming from show breeders. I have a talented field dog (and future NAFC ) laying at my feet right now. In a couple hours he will be leaving the line like a rocket for some marks and blinds.
    Consider that the pup you buy will be your companion for a decade plus. Get a pup from the best litter you can find, preferably stacked with FC/AFC dogs with generations of good health.
    The money you save getting a pup from a backyard breeder or show breeders reject can be eaten up with one vet bill.
    "I'm thankful someone stood up to him, even if it was a woman." Franco 10/18/19

  8. #6
    Senior Member HarryWilliams's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Washington
    Posts
    1,547

    Default

    Find a breeder, with a good reputation, that sells most of their dogs to hunting & pet homes. Make sure they have health clearances (Hips, elbows, EIC, CNM, Eyes) and that they are used in the field (hunt or hunt tests) with a title (MH or SH) on one or both. A good pup from that breeding would be good for a hunting dog. You'll still need to train it. Wish you well! Harry
    "Sometimes we just gotta do what is right". Jerry 2006

    See ya in the field. HPW http://www.sagaciouskennel.com/

  9. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Southeastern PA
    Posts
    172

    Default

    Lots of good advice already, you have enough.

    Now go get a puppy and enjoy it !
    Tarnation of Apache
    Tumblin TurboJet

  10. #8
    Senior Member KwickLabs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Roscoe, IL
    Posts
    3,189

    Default

    "I mainly want a dog for companionship and for long life and good canine health. Hunting talent is secondary in importance to me as
    long as he can pick up the doves, the ducks and the pheasant without damaging the quarry and promptly return the fowl to my hand."


    There are several steps in the process of having a life long "hunting companion". This post is not a about selecting the right pup. It
    is more about making sure that the important early windows of opportunity are not lost in the journey. The following links describe
    the process of imprinting that companionship hunting window. There are three steps 1) establishing a relationship, 2) training and
    3) hunting experience......in that order. The first two, done well, make the last one easier (and more fun).

    The described approach is contrary to the often used technique of learning on the job.

    https://web.archive.org/web/20190408...ToadIsland.htm

    https://web.archive.org/web/20190408...TealIsland.htm\

    https://web.archive.org/web/20150515...stDuckHunt.htm
    Last edited by KwickLabs; 02-17-2020 at 02:28 PM.
    Jim Boyer KwickLabsii.com

  11. #9
    Senior Member Gary M's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Northern Michigan
    Posts
    339

    Default

    Hey Jonah. Welcome to the forum. Great advice given above. I recommend what Harry said in finding a good breeder. Many good ones out there and many not so good. I suggest contacting Chris Wincek at Kerrybrook https://kerrybrook.com/

  12. #10

    Default

    If you look at a Golden I would suggest going to K9data.com for pedigree and health Certs on dogs. I have 2 field bred goldens laying on the floor of my living room at my feet now. Field bred dogs lab or golden can and do have good house manners if trained. My female golden has a lot of go in the field but is also a hospice visitation dog where she is very calm and mannerly. I upland hunt with both dogs but their number 1 job is house pet. As previously suggested, find a reputable breeder. A Backyard breeder may work out but is a crap shoot at best.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •