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Thread: Walking on walkups

  1. #1

    Default Walking on walkups

    Over the years we have had 2 different outside judges stress the need for the handler to walk on a walkup.
    I could find nothing in the rulebook about this.

    The judges did not want to see a "sneak" as a hunter would do while jump shooting.
    One judge from Louisiana was clear that if the handler "sneaks", he would be sent back to the holding blind.
    A second "sneak" by the handler would be elimination.

    At our latest AKC seminar, the national rep said he had no problem with a handler "sneaking" in a walkup.
    That makes sense to me since that is how most hunters who a jump shooting walk up while hunting.
    Also as a judge, what if a handler is in a wheelchair, or crutches...

    I do not judge, and would appreciate thoughts and what are the customs from different areas of the country.

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    I would LOVE to see handlers sneaking quietly! There is nothing in the rule book that says this is not allowed, but some judges make up their own, unfortunately.

    Usually when judging, I am treated to what I consider excessive commands of heel, here, mark, etc. by the handlers on the way to the area where the first bird will be presented, whether it is a walkup test or not. A couple of quiet commands is certainly fine, and to be expected. What I dislike is a steady litany of commands that are obviously only background noise from the dog's perspective, and largely being ignored. It does affect the trainability score in Master tests, and may in Senior tests, depending on severity. -Paul
    Last edited by paul young; 03-06-2020 at 09:42 AM.
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    Senior Member Tobias's Avatar
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    Hi Paul,

    does/can/should this rule come into play, when it comes to how the handler should approach the line?

    "Judges must explain the test set-up to the handler, andfurther explain the objectives or scenarios as they relateto a specific hunting situation. "


    I think of the times I have seen a pheasant trying to sneak off while hunting, and rather than have my dog try to catch up to it, I put him at heel and walk (at a fairly quick clip) to where I last saw the bird. I am not a 'legitimate' pheasant hunter, having only been a few times.. but this worked for me on a couple of occasions.
    The way I look at it, every dog is an opportunity to be a better trainer, and every day is a new day to be a better trainer to the same dog we trained yesterday.

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    Senior Member road kill's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tobias View Post
    Hi Paul,

    does/can/should this rule come into play, when it comes to how the handler should approach the line?

    "Judges must explain the test set-up to the handler, andfurther explain the objectives or scenarios as they relate a specific hunting situation. "


    I think of the times I have seen a pheasant trying to sneak off while hunting, and rather than have my dog try to catch up to it, I put him at heel and walk (at a fairly quick clip) to where I last saw the bird. I am not a 'legitimate' pheasant hunter, having only been a few times.. but this worked for me on a couple of occasions.
    I always try to explain my set ups in as much detail as I can, at least what I thought when I set them up.
    I explain what the factors are and what I am looking for the dog to do.

    On a land walk-up (upland type situation), if the dog is just outside the gun and I think he was just trying to get a better angle on the bird, I ask the handler to re-heel the dog and then release him or her.
    I don't usually see too many upland hunters sneaking up on pheasant...…...but maybe some do.
    I don't usually mark down a dog that just changed a little to get a better view.
    Kind of arbitrary, but we (the judges) always discuss that ahead of time.
    Most judges I have worked with agree with that assessment.

    In a water walk-up, we don't like to see the dog go ahead into the water, that is not a good thing.
    And "sneaking" up on a pot hole to jump shoot makes sense.

    BUT----It is all dependent on what is happening that day, things are fluid in these games.

    As experienced hunters and handlers, generally speaking, we know what the "sneak" is really about and we understand.
    Last edited by road kill; 03-07-2020 at 08:34 AM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tobias View Post
    Hi Paul,

    does/can/should this rule come into play, when it comes to how the handler should approach the line?

    "Judges must explain the test set-up to the handler, andfurther explain the objectives or scenarios as they relateto a specific hunting situation. "


    I think of the times I have seen a pheasant trying to sneak off while hunting, and rather than have my dog try to catch up to it, I put him at heel and walk (at a fairly quick clip) to where I last saw the bird. I am not a 'legitimate' pheasant hunter, having only been a few times.. but this worked for me on a couple of occasions.

    It does come into play. In every test, for that matter.

    In a lot of cases, I prefer to use the walk up component incorporated into the land-water combination test as a jump shoot scenario, as long as my co-judge agrees. This lends itself to 'sneaking' if the handler wants to do so. Doing it allows for that relatively short mark required in a walk up to have some meaning and difficulty if thrown into cover in the water. I wouldn't make it mandatory to sneak because some people have physical conditions that might make it difficult or impossible for them to do so.

    Hard to sneak up on a pheasant, in my experience. That usually results in a footrace, quickly followed by a wild flush out of gun range, but a quiet hunter and Retriever team can successfully pull off a sneak on resting waterfowl in a lot of situations. -Paul
    there's no good reason to fatten up a retriever.

  8. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by paul young View Post
    It does come into play. In every test, for that matter.

    In a lot of cases, I prefer to use the walk up component incorporated into the land-water combination test as a jump shoot scenario, as long as my co-judge agrees. This lends itself to 'sneaking' if the handler wants to do so. Doing it allows for that relatively short mark required in a walk up to have some meaning and difficulty if thrown into cover in the water. I wouldn't make it mandatory to sneak because some people have physical conditions that might make it difficult or impossible for them to do so.

    Hard to sneak up on a pheasant, in my experience. That usually results in a footrace, quickly followed by a wild flush out of gun range, but a quiet hunter and Retriever team can successfully pull off a sneak on resting waterfowl in a lot of situations. -Paul
    Thanks for all the replies!
    I walk up on late season wild roosters quite frequently in northern Idaho/eastern Washington
    ...I hunt with a partner who is working up a draw with his lab,
    while I hustle out of sight across wheat stubble to block at the end of the draw...either I get a flush on the walk-up
    with my partner still working 100-200 yards away coming up the draw
    or a rooster decides to hold tight and later gets flushed by both dogs rooting in the cover.
    Then we switch positions for the next draw.

    How about someone that is wheelchair bound on walkups? I've never seen it, but I imagine it has occurred somewhere?

    Thanks.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave_Verbyla View Post
    Thanks for all the replies!
    I walk up on late season wild roosters quite frequently in northern Idaho/eastern Washington
    ...I hunt with a partner who is working up a draw with his lab,
    while I hustle out of sight across wheat stubble to block at the end of the draw...either I get a flush on the walk-up
    with my partner still working 100-200 yards away coming up the draw
    or a rooster decides to hold tight and later gets flushed by both dogs rooting in the cover.
    Then we switch positions for the next draw.

    How about someone that is wheelchair bound on walkups? I've never seen it, but I imagine it has occurred somewhere?

    Thanks.
    If someone has problems with mobility, every effort would be made to accommodate them, of course.

    I always look for a site that is level and firm for the walk up test. No need to make things any more difficult. -Paul
    there's no good reason to fatten up a retriever.

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    Senior Member Steve Thornton's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave_Verbyla View Post
    Over the years we have had 2 different outside judges stress the need for the handler to walk on a walkup.
    I could find nothing in the rulebook about this.

    The judges did not want to see a "sneak" as a hunter would do while jump shooting.
    One judge from Louisiana was clear that if the handler "sneaks", he would be sent back to the holding blind.
    A second "sneak" by the handler would be elimination.

    At our latest AKC seminar, the national rep said he had no problem with a handler "sneaking" in a walkup.
    That makes sense to me since that is how most hunters who a jump shooting walk up while hunting.
    Also as a judge, what if a handler is in a wheelchair, or crutches...

    I do not judge, and would appreciate thoughts and what are the customs from different areas of the country.
    Last I looked "sneaking" is walking. Crutches, no problem by me as long as they hold the gun, same for a wheelchair. In the absence of a clear rule common sense and reason should be used to interpret the intent of the rules or lack there of.

    Again, this just my humble opinion.
    Steve

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