Success/ Failure rate in training set-ups. - Page 3
The RetrieverTraining.Net Forums The Retriever Academy
Total Retriever Training with Mike Lardy
Hawkeye Media Gunners Up Tritronics Wildear
Retriever Coach
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 21 to 25 of 25

Thread: Success/ Failure rate in training set-ups.

  1. #21
    Senior Member EdA's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Posts
    9,433

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Sabireley View Post

    The trick is knowing and reading the dog. Is the dog educated enough, smart enough, has enough drive, has enough heart, and is physically capable to do the setup?

    I’ll add that location and context are important. Just because a dog does cheating singles on your home grounds perfectly every time does not mean they will do it perfectly in a different location.
    Not much to add to that. I took the liberty to condense the takeaway message to three sentences. I would add that on occasion when training emphasize working on your dog’s weaknesses.

  2. Remove Advertisements
    RetrieverTraining.net
    Advertisements
     

  3. #22
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Anywhere we want, USA
    Posts
    4,944

    Default

    I have never seen a dog that didn't fail at something in training or a trial at some point. I have never seen a trainer/handler who didn't do the same. No pain, no gain.

    I have touched on this before, but you can only really train during the periods that the dog has a significant break between tests or trials. If you are entered in trials or tests week after week, you really can't do anything but prepare for the next trial.

    Does anyone really want to break a dog's momentum by focusing on a weakness with only 4-5 days between trials? That would inevitably mean introducing significant mental, and possibly physical stress to the dog as it struggles to assimilate new skills or improve on poor ones.

    Ideally, going into a trial you want the dog to be confident, bold and relaxed. At the top of it's game.

    To address the OP's question, the ideal success rate is going to vary according to the individual dog. At some point, almost all of them need to be taken down a peg or two to maintain your control. But a steady stream of failures may weigh the dog down and stifle their ability to make good decisions and respond to the handler in the way that is most productive. It's important to realize that what a dog perceives as failure may differ from ours. In the long run, if the dog has a good attitude and is willing to work with you, you have it about right for that particular dog. We all need to really observe our dog's body language, physical appearance, and demeanor every day in order to assess how things are going. -Paul
    Last edited by paul young; 05-23-2020 at 09:40 AM.
    there's no good reason to fatten up a retriever.

  4. #23
    Senior Member Sabireley's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Culpeper VA
    Posts
    1,562

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by EdA View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Sabireley View Post

    The trick is knowing and reading the dog. Is the dog educated enough, smart enough, has enough drive, has enough heart, and is physically capable to do the setup?

    I’ll add that location and context are important. Just because a dog does cheating singles on your home grounds perfectly every time does not mean they will do it perfectly in a different location.
    Not much to add to that. I took the liberty to condense the takeaway message to three sentences. I would add that on occasion when training emphasize working on your dog’s weaknesses.
    I’ll add that dogs who have had some time off from training might need to be eased back in before running at their previous level. They can get a little rusty sitting around for awhile.

  5. Remove Advertisements
    RetrieverTraining.net
    Advertisements
     

  6. #24

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by moscowitz View Post
    ..... plan B ready to put in if dog needs help.
    This turned into a great threat. With well thought responses by so many. I wanted to quote the above from our friend in the Nutmeg State. So sweet and short (the post not the poster) as it could be overlooked is so very important.
    Always have a plan B no matter the type of setup your running think of the what ifs and have a plan in place. And share your plan with your help in the field.

  7. #25
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    115

    Default

    Great topic, and several precepts come to mind. A dog can’t learn if it never has to be corrected. Are you training or exercising? Keep in mind, you are 100% responsible for your dog’s attitude, so what kind of test is best to run next? When your dog is confident, happy and running hard, throw the book at ‘em, but be fair. Opposite is true if dog’s attitude is sour. Start every training session with a test the dog can do; also end every training session with a test the dog can do; train hard in between; result-dog looks forward to getting out of the crate to go to work, and goes to bed happy every night. A rerun after correction can serve as final test of the day since dog can do it. Think about what concept you are trying to instill in the dog, not the minutia of a particular setup. So, bottom line, the failure rate is an ever changing happenstance of where you and your dog are in your training program.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •