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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
what command do you give your dog for it to heel on the opposite side that he/she was initially trained for? for instance, my dog heels on my right (i shoot left handed), when i give a heel command she heels to my right side. if i wanted to start training her to heel on the left side, what command would / could i give to her for her to know to go to that side and not the normal one? does this make sense?
 

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I still use the command heel, but hold out a different hand to signal which side she should go to. This is also what I do when she is returning with a bird to signal which side she should heel on.
 

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Still say "heel" but step back with the left leg instead of your right. It's easy to train for.

Angie
 

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Since the dog has been accustomed to right sided heel, you might put the dog on a lead for a few sessions and in a front remote sit. Call dog, when he is returning step back with your left leg so that you are at a 45 degree angle to the dog. With the lead guide the dog to your left side. Then without lead, step back with left leg and put hand down at say 45 degree angle on left side. If he is used to sitting on a mat, stand on the right side of the mat.
Hope this helps.
 

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I tried to convert a left sided dog to two sided. Not worth the effort IMO, and it certainly was not easy for this dog. I found that heel for him was ingrained to mean left side. I abandoned the effort but I could, and still can, bring him in on my right if I don't say heel. Just hold out the hand and step back as others mentioned. The problem I encounter is when he is a bit slow coming in or sits before squaring up in position. I'll say the word heel and he will jump up and spin around to what he knows as the heel position on my left. It is so easy to get a new pup to heel on both sides, but to convert and older dog is another story.
 

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I started my new pup with 2 sided heeling. I use my hands to either side , but also use a verbal "side" to heel on the right. Now at just say heel or side upon returning, but also could just put right or left hand out.
 

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I just use my hand as to which side I want the dog on.

Teaching it from a pup is very easy but once the dog is older it takes much more time and patients. I did convert Dora when she was about 4 years old into a 2 sided dog but it was a challenge.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
thanks for the replies, will try these suggestions today.
 

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My dog heels at the left side (walks with me and sits) with the word "heel". I never have him walk with me on my right side but I call him to sit on my right side with the german word for heel, "fuss", pronounced foos.
 

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The training methods above should work fine. As to the word, it doesn't really matter which word you use. I just say "right" when I want a heel on the right, because it's easy for me to remember.
 

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What advantage does one get from having a dog that is trained to heal either side? I shoot left, so have always had my dogs heel left so that when I am carrying my gun in the crook of my left arm or when I am sitting with the gun across my lap, the muzzle will be aimed away from the dog. The only time that I can think of that a right heel would be really nice is when I am sitting on the couch watching tv as I sit at the right end so can't really call him to heel then.
 

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Some hunt test or FT scenarios can be easier with two sided heeling. Which side is a cue o tell the dog where they are headed. Or help to anyway. Also in some hunting scenarios, it is easier or safer if the dog is on one side of the blind or the other. We unt out of a pit that I wish my right sided dog would be comfortable out the left side but he is not. He always wants to circle behind to the right side which is the prominent direction of the birds most generally.
 

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What advantage does one get from having a dog that is trained to heal either side? I shoot left, so have always had my dogs heel left so that when I am carrying my gun in the crook of my left arm or when I am sitting with the gun across my lap, the muzzle will be aimed away from the dog. The only time that I can think of that a right heel would be really nice is when I am sitting on the couch watching tv as I sit at the right end so can't really call him to heel then.
There are lots of potential applications for 2 sided heeling. I just did a search and a few threads came up on the subject. We went from 1 dog to 4 dogs in my family quickly. Thanks to 2 sided heeling, I can walk my dogs offlead through the neighborhood or park with 2 dogs on each side of me. And I can pick and choose who walks on which side, with no problem.

Some folks like 2-sided, and some don't. There are pros out there who prefer 2-sided dogs, but take the dogs on after their basics are complete. It seems in most cases, those pros just run those dogs as 1-sided, with the thought that it's really simple to teach it to a puppy, but it is perhaps not worth the effort to "overwrite the hard drive" on an older dog already conditioned to 1-sided.

I would imagine all future pups I train, housepet or competition dog, will be 2-sided. It's just too easy to teach and too functional not to teach it in my opinion.

And yes, for the person accustomed to a 1-sided dog, it can get confusing. If you're that person and you have a pro-trained dog, you probably should stay 1-sided, because you'll get confused and the dog/handler team will get messed up. But if you are doing your own training, and you've always just done one-sided, it's pretty easy to learn together with a pup. There will be so much repetition, you both will just do it as second-nature.

Chris
 

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I still use the command heel, but hold out a different hand to signal which side she should go to. This is also what I do when she is returning with a bird to signal which side she should heel on.
Both of our Labs were trained to be either side heelers. The only verbal is "heel" and then my husband does exactly as is stated above. He holds out a hand to indicate which side they should go to -- including which side to heel on when they are returning with the bird.
 

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With me and my three, there are few variables... For the most part I work the dogs on my left side the mirror image of how I work them on my right side.

john
 

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Do you use the pockets on both sides of your trousers?;)
Actually, not much, but am to a great extent ambidextrous although I can't write lefty (although many would say that my handwriting sort of indicates that I can't write right either.)
 

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Actually, not much, but am to a great extent ambidextrous although I can't write lefty (although many would say that my handwriting sort of indicates that I can't write right either.)
it is not the number of times you use um, just the fact you are able to. Some folk I train with have 2-sided but most often use only one side. Others swap forth and back all the time, sometimes in the same multiple, sending from one side and recieving on the other. However, the worry of the 2-sided dog? Driving home afore lunch wondering if you should have sent from the other side.
 

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What advantage does one get from having a dog that is trained to heal either side?
In my opionon, not much.......A dog is either trained for a "concept" or it isn't....you can have the dog sit on top your head

A recent example,

First series of a MH we ran a few weeks ago was a walk-up poison bird thrown from left to right, No the dog off the mark run the blind wich the line was 25yds to the right of the poison bird. I watched several folks try to flip flop their dog and it didn't change the outcome ONE BIT...the dog was either trained for the concept or it wasn't.

I know their are plenty of logical arguments for dual sided heeling...I don't do it and it hasn't cost me a ribbon(plenty of other things have) Some very well regarded FT Am's in my area don't do it either.

just my 1/10 a euro's worth
 
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