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Hi Everyone,

I have a WPG that is heading to training for 3 months starting at the end of this month. The kennel is requiring a 5th parvo vaccine because the last (4th) was not given after the puppies 5th month of life.

It makes sense and the kennel is only looking out for the best interest of the dogs. My vet has some some concerns and it seems like a lot for the first 6 months of the little guys life. I just wanted to see if anyone else has experience on this and if they have gotten the OK from their vet. I am pretty sure my vet would do it if I pushed. I am just looking for a little more insight and back up.

What does everyone think?
 

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What exactly is the vet's concern other than a different protocol than he followed? I think the kennel is taking the safest route.
 

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It is a muddy and unclear issue even among practicing vets. I just had this discussion w/my very seasoned (69) vet of 20 years regarding yearly Parvo/Distemper etc. shots versus the now accepted 2 year interval. His argument based on his CT/MA practice is the high number of dogs he has had in the past two years w/it despite having a yearly shot. Our previous discussions indicated even w/most shots depending on the individual animal and outside exposure that it was about 70% protection @ best. My longtime MN vet of over 35 years has been a proponent of 2/3 year intervals. The real reason is fear of no vet paperwork supporting maximum vaccinations to support a dog health clearances . In the event a kennel/even vet shop could be proven as the source of contamination when a client's dog contracted the illness there would be trouble. New born pups having dew claws removed are often done in the client's vehicle not in the shop. That is why , many kennels will not accept owner vaccinated dogs even w/proper vaccine identification , etc..For instance I have done Corona for 35 years where most do not. Dogs @ FTs or HTs come from varied places w/contamination issues, they urinate, defecate and pick up common birds with their saliva....Soooo?
 

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I think the kennel has a good protocol. I require an extra if the puppy's last vaccine was before 4 months. (not 5). But, my own dogs receive an extra parvo booster at 5 months .
Many vets are stopping the vaccines at 12 weeks !! That does not fly for entrance into my kennel- Ive sent dogs away when Ive seen that and told them to get another and come back. Stickler I know-but I prefer to err on the safe side.
Perhaps the kennel you mentioned is aware of a concentration of parvo in their area and are being extra cautious. I always give kudos to someone erring on the safe side of vaccines (ie- give them vs. not give them)...
If you think your vet will give you trouble on this, you can find another who will give that last parvo.
 

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I actually think the vet is being pretty proactive in not wanting to over vaccinate. Studies have found most of the core vaccines Pravo and distemper etc. last up to 7 yrs, or the length of the study. The only reason we do a series of puppy shots is to ensure the pups get protection as soon as possible while maternal antibodies wear off. Maternal antibodies attack the vaccine making it inert, which is why you need to have pups weaned prior to the first shot, still moms antibodies can hang around for some time in particular pups (usually 2-4 wks after weaning) meaning some might not get protection from those first shots. Realistically all pups weaned at a normal age could have one shot at 12-16wks and be covered for 7 yrs. if not for a lifetime (those studies are ongoing). Once the immune system has learned to recognize the antigens it remembers, another vaccine doesn't really do anything. Still over vaccination has been tied to health issues in particular animals, injection site sarcomas, cancers, allergies etc. With vaccines less seems to be more if you can help it. I applaud the vet for looking out for your dog, ask the kennel if they will accept viral titer results. A titer test will tell yah if your dog has protection for the antigens, which it's highly likely the dog already does. Still if some are missing your vet can do individual vaccines for the missing antigen, and you don't x5 up on something your dog doesn't need.
 

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This is my view. Dogs have died of Parvo if they haven't had their last vaccination after 20 weeks. I think the kennel is following good advice, particularly if it has happened in their region, and they are trying to keep their kennel dogs safe. There is no one size fits. By saying one vaccination should be enough that is not true because the second vaccination boosters the antibody protection whereas one vaccination does not receive the optimum production and trails off slowly. You can research this yourself. I follow middle of the road vaccination rules: a full series of puppy vaccinations with last vaccination after 20 weeks , booster a year after that, and then every 3 years. I use a high titer vaccine where there is still antigen left over to produce immunity after the maternal antibody is bound. Titers can be misleading because the rate at which individuals lose immunity to specific diseases varies quite a bit. I think it is far worse to load up on multiple vaccines at once, thereby lowering immunity for a few weeks, than by giving an extra booster after 20 weeks. I separate my vaccines.
 

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Parvo virus maternal antibodies capable of interfering with the immune response may persist until 20 weeks of age therefore Parvo virus immunization at or after 20 weeks of age is good practice. The threat for Parvo virus infection is almost non existent in vaccinated dogs over 1 year old.
 

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Parvo virus maternal antibodies capable of interfering with the immune response may persist until 20 weeks of age therefore Parvo virus immunization at or after 20 weeks of age is good practice. The threat for Parvo virus infection is almost non existent in vaccinated dogs over 1 year old.
Ah, the voice of wisdom....:) Thanks Dr Ed!
 

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Check out NeoPar vaccines for Parvo. I had Parvo in my last litter of puppies (came down with it at less than 7 weeks of age) and lost 3 puppies despite 24-hr vet care. I've opted to give NeoPar (which has been proven to break through maternal antibodies to provide almost immediate protection) at 4 and 6 weeks of age. I'll start the normal series of puppy shots at 8 weeks and 13 weeks, then titer test after that to determine if another set of vaccines is necessary. Parvo is a horrible disease for puppies and young dogs. If the puppy does not produce antibodies in response to a vaccine given after about 20 weeks, it's unlikely that another vaccine will get any better immune response. I have one from the Parvo litter that just doesn't mount a response to Distemper despite vaccinating twice (once after 6 mo of age). But it does happen with some dogs.
 

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Immunization is enough for most viruses. Don’t expect your veterinarian to ask you broadly what you want to do when you take your dog in for an annual exam. Most veterinarians, unless prompted by the client, will assume that you’re there for “the usual” and will go ahead and recommend annual vaccinations. It is up to you to educate yourself and advocate for your dog and know what vaccines and tests might benefit him, and to know the laws concerning how frequently the rabies vaccine must be administered.

If you and your veterinarian are not on the same page, try having a rational, objective discussion. Put yourself in her position and try to understand her concerns. Take a step back to be sure that what you propose is reasonable. Keep in mind that taking your dog in regularly for annual checkups will help your veterinarian to develop further trust in you and your intentions. If you’ve got a good relationship and you’re armed with the facts, you just might be able to reach common ground.
 

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Check out NeoPar vaccines for Parvo. I had Parvo in my last litter of puppies (came down with it at less than 7 weeks of age) and lost 3 puppies despite 24-hr vet care. I've opted to give NeoPar (which has been proven to break through maternal antibodies to provide almost immediate protection) .
I would LOVE to see this data if you have it. Th company refuses to supply the study work They talk about. After multiple times contacting that company for data I have given up. There ARE vaccines on the market that have proven data on their label to show they override maternal antibodies.
 
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