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Your gonna have alot of different opinions on this post. This is just my experiance with my current dog. She will be 3 in May. She got her HR at 16 months and her HRCH at 26 months. She had a heat cycle while we were running finished that screwed up a weekend of testing that would have allowed her to be finished before she was 2. These time frames could of possibly been shorter if she would have went to a pro trainer. I did all of the training with her myself. Currently training for the spring grand. Hope this helps.

Ken Youngs
Michigander Retrievers
 

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I contacted the AKC and inquired on getting a report from them. The might only give me the raw data but I can do the math if they can supply the information.

I think I will contact HRC and see if they can do something as well.
 

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It seems like many people are getting their dogs titled at higher levels at rather young ages now, maybe it is just experienced training that is allowing trainers to train younger dogs more efficiently, but many times a dog will get his JH title when it is 1 then its 2nd year earns a SH title and at 3 to 4 many dogs recieve their MH title, this is just what I have seen with quite a few dogs. Granted there are always variables and no true time limits. It is usually the owners ambition and the dogs maturity level, if a dog is trained 3 to 6 days a week then they will be ready sooner. I didnt get into hunt tests till my dog was 2 so I am off by a year but she will be 4 - (I hope) when she gets her MH - for me it is time and money for the Hunt tests. each year I can afford about 5 to 7 hunt tests which includes driving and lodging - it all adds upto about 1000 a title which is why many people are starting to skip JH and go strait to SH. If you have more dogs then it can be reduced but each weekend runs about 150 to 300 dollars depending on the drive and where you stay and if it is a double hunt test weekend or a single. Good luck.
 

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It seems like many people are getting their dogs titled at higher levels at rather young ages now, maybe it is just experienced training that is allowing trainers to train younger dogs more efficiently, but many times a dog will get his JH title when it is 1 then its 2nd year earns a SH title and at 3 to 4 many dogs recieve their MH title, this is just what I have seen with quite a few dogs. Granted there are always variables and no true time limits. It is usually the owners ambition and the dogs maturity level, if a dog is trained 3 to 6 days a week then they will be ready sooner. I didnt get into hunt tests till my dog was 2 so I am off by a year but she will be 4 - (I hope) when she gets her MH - for me it is time and money for the Hunt tests. each year I can afford about 5 to 7 hunt tests which includes driving and lodging - it all adds upto about 1000 a title which is why many people are starting to skip JH and go strait to SH. If you have more dogs then it can be reduced but each weekend runs about 150 to 300 dollars depending on the drive and where you stay and if it is a double hunt test weekend or a single. Good luck.
The words above in bold sums it up. I don't see the point in attaining titles so quickly. What's the point? Bragging rights?

As a first time dog owner I had it all planned out as to title goals and timelines but that has fallen apart due to other interests and money concerns. Two years later I don't really care about title timelines any more. I'm more interested in the journey. Training my dog (for hunt tests and obedience) is plenty interesting enough for me that now a title is just icing on the cake. Besides, if I got the titles quickly, what would I have to look forward to?

My dog's three and he has a CDX title and with a little bit of luck will have UD and HR titles before the year is out.
 

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My AWS, Gumbo got his Seasoned title at 16 months and his Finished and Upland title at 20 Months. At that time, he was the 3rd youngest Spaniel to get a HRCH.
 

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Is there an average age for obtaining a senior/seasoned title and master/finished. Just curious.
If you are trying to build a time line or have a measuring stick to guage your dog's progress, I'd say that is fine, but just remember that each dog and each trainer are unique. Trying to cram a dog into a certain time line, more often than not, leads to lower standards and chronic problems.

Better to run the dog in tests when the dog is ready+ for the level tested.

ready+ for even Started/JH level means to me...
The dog will heel tractably to the holding blinds and line both on and off lead.
The dog is delivering to hand.
The dog is steady in training under very demanding circumstances without a lead.
The dog is through swim-by and cheating work.
The dog has completed pattern blinds, blind drills, PB with diversions, etc. and is running colds blinds.

If I didn't know that many Junior and Started judges often set up cheaty water tests, I'd consider running before swim-by and cheating work is complete.

I ran my first dogs in Junior/Started, Seasoned, etc. but now that I've scratched the itch and put a few titles on my dogs, I'll only run Finished/Master tests because basically, I want my dogs at this level before I run any test.
 

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Contacted AKC and for a mere $85 per breed per report they can can give me the info you requested.
 

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IMHO timelines aren't of much use to train the dog you have. There are always those that have 'wonder pups' that are FF'd at a very young age, running tests and earning accolades at 6 mos. and it might work fine for that particular dog, but not for yours. I've had dogs that were ready for formal training at 4 mos. and those that for whatever reason--immaturity, my finances, etc. that weren't formally trained til 12-18 mos. Doesn't mean that they are any worse than wonder pup that has master passes before it's a year old, just that they are different. I have a 6 yr. old male running masters--but I sold him at 15 mos. and he had 4 different homes in 4 years and came back home for good with lots of baggage. He's a very talented dog--but it is taking longer for him to unlearn some bad habits than if he'd had the proper sequential training from the start. On the other hand, if he hadn't spent time hunting and gotten tons of wild birds, I doubt he'd be running HT at all. His love of birds is what has gotten him over some of the baggage he came back with last year.
 

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IMHO publishing a set of the average age for receiving one title will not help the newby's. The biggest problem in running young dogs for the fast acqusition of titles is that it just creates bad habits that will cause considerably more problems (line manners, cheating) when you advance. Better to progress through the titles and enjoy them with a dog that is under control than get sucked into the my dog was a blah blah at this age. Long time ago we didn't have titles that young dogs could run for (HT) so most people didn't break them out until they were competitive say at 20 months. Those that were competitive in derby's early often suffer the same fate, out of control line manners, unless they are run by seasoned trainers who have high standards in training always.
 

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Depends...... righ LVL?

When the dog is clearly running at the next level higher then what you are going to test at. Maybe not running smooth master / finished but doing that work pretty well that way they are under whelmed by the tests that any judge can send them to at the lower levels.
 

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OK did a quick bit of math from dogs entered in a master test and here are my results (These are just random dogs not mine)

20 dogs with Junior titles average age getting a junior title 20 months (youngest 7 months, oldest 40 months)

22 dogs with Senior Titles average age when getting a senior title 31.25 months (youngest 12 months, oldest 5 years 4 months)

14 dogs average time getting a Master title 4 years 4.5 months (youngest 2 years 8 months, oldest 7 years 2 months)

By no means a scientific study based only from data of a single hunt test in California.
 

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I might have this wrong because I don't run hunt tests, but it's always been my perception that worrying about the age a dog titles is just another version of - my dog is better than your dog.
 

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I might have this wrong because I don't run hunt tests, but it's always been my perception that worrying about the age a dog titles is just another version of - my dog is better than your dog.
Absolutely and if the OP had asked what the youngest dog to get a senior or a master title was that would have been a big tip off. But since he asked for the average age for a title then I would think he is wondering if he is on par with training. Or he just might be a numbers freak like me and some of us just like average dogs.:)
 

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I might have this wrong because I don't run hunt tests, but it's always been my perception that worrying about the age a dog titles is just another version of - my dog is better than your dog.
Sounds about right. Same goes for field trials. Just read an add for studs or litters and you see folks marketing based on how young the dog was when it obtained x title.

Do you believe this is faulty thinking? If your dog won an open at 3 years old, while my 5 year old can't finish a Qual, I'd say your dog is better than mine. In HT speak if you put a MH on your 2 year old, while I can't pass a Junior test with my 5 year old, your dog...
 

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IMHO publishing a set of the average age for receiving one title will not help the newby's. The biggest problem in running young dogs for the fast acqusition of titles is that it just creates bad habits that will cause considerably more problems (line manners, cheating) when you advance. Better to progress through the titles and enjoy them with a dog that is under control than get sucked into the my dog was a blah blah at this age. Long time ago we didn't have titles that young dogs could run for (HT) so most people didn't break them out until they were competitive say at 20 months. Those that were competitive in derby's early often suffer the same fate, out of control line manners, unless they are run by seasoned trainers who have high standards in training always.

pay VERY close attention to what was stated above...

Whats your hurry?

MICHAELBAKER
 

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pay VERY close attention to what was stated above...

Whats your hurry?

MICHAELBAKER
And that is very very good advice! Wait till the dog and you are ready for the test before entering. Take your time especially with your first dog. Go to a lot of club training days and run and ask the helpful pros or good amatuers if they think you are ready and what you need to work on.
 

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Some good advice here, my plan is to train a lot before testing, so far it been working ok, I was suprised on the level of change from junior to senior , now it starts to be a team, it takes both to do correct to pass, ask how I found this out......
 
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