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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I need some guidance from the RTF community. I am having a couple two dog boxes built to put on a trailer for now, but later transfered into a truck. I am trying to go into them pretty economically as they are kind of a short term set-up for me, but don't want to skimp on something that I shouldn't.

I am thinking two different options.

#1) very basic, standard doors, no insulation, no permanent mounted fans.

#2) louvered doors with back screens, boxes insulated, FRP on the walls and ceiling but stainless floor pans, fan.

The second option would cost me around double the first option.

I am concerned about the insulation for the summer heat more so than the winter cold. This will be used for hauling dogs for training a couple times a week and at a few weekend hunt tests through the end of May (high of mid 70's are average, but could be into the 80's). It won't really be used throughout the summer months unless it is for a an early morning training session.

At what point does the insulation help for an aluminum box in regards to heat? Above 70? Above 80?

The option #1 box would look similar to the box below. (well, they both would look like this other than the standard doors vs louvered)



Thanks so much for your help.
 

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My dog boxes aren't insulated and I have never had a problem. However, my boxes have a storage area on top that is about 8 inches deep with a inch of so of foam insulation (more for cushion for stuff in the storage compartment). This provides some insulation from the sun on the top of the box.

If the dogs are in the boxes for a prolonged period (like at a hunt test) in the heat of the day, I put a block of ice in with them and turn the fans on. I check on them periodically and they are snoring away. We have been out when the temp was in the high 90's but I also try to find shade to park my truck.

I make the ice in gallon milk jugs and cut the plastic off.
 

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agree with wayne. the storage area on top of the box i previously owned was critical to my summer use. in sunlight the ceiling of dog holes was cool, if you opened the storage area the underside of the storage lid was hot. if mid 70's low 80's are your highs, you have a storage area on top and use common sense/shade you should be fine. on the box you pictured, direct overhead sun will be hot for the dogs.

but if there is a way you can afford it, get it!
 

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What type of insultation would everyone suggest, post production?

I would worry especially stopped in heavy traffic.
 

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Did a little research on SS vs Aluminum. Aluminum transfers heat at about 5 times the rate of SS. They put Aluminum discs in cookware for a reason. Including Copper and SS frying pans.
 

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If $$ are really tight you can add a foil backed "bubble" insulation sheet to the inside top of the crates. It can be glued in and the dogs should not try to eat it. Not much R value but it does have a high reflectivity quotient and will help keep the radiant heat transfer from the AL to a more managable level. I did this with an AL crossover box and it worked fairly well, even in FL. But I parked in shade and the pups rode in the cab when the temp went above 90. My next box will have ceiling, wall and floor insulation. And, if I have it custom made, a large opening to the water tank so I can fill it with ice.
 

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I don't think plastic is much better without insulation and certainly not without a fan of some sort. With my new pup around August I was doing water work with him early and put him in a plastic crate about 8:00 in the morning. I had sold my previous SS box. Came back 15 min. later after helping with another dog. Took him out and I might as well have put him in a hot bath or sauna. I now have a SS used Deerskin box with fan and insulation top, sides and bottom. Stick a frozen 2 gal. water bottle in there turn on the fan and he has A/C. Huge difference. Even without the fan the difference is substantial.
 

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When it is hot, I put my dogs on a stake out in the shade to let them dry out before going in the dog box.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
BUMP. Any other thoughts on how to insulate an aluminum dog box that doesn't have insulation. Doors are four slat louvers, has good ventilation, but still worried about keeping heat out. Any help is greatly appreciated.
 

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BUMP. Any other thoughts on how to insulate an aluminum dog box that doesn't have insulation. Doors are four slat louvers, has good ventilation, but still worried about keeping heat out. Any help is greatly appreciated.



I worry to death about heat insulated or not. Probably cuz I hate the heat myself. Putting a hot dog in a hot box and insulation aint going to do you any good. If it's 80 degrees out it's going to be hotter in the box. Fan is every bit as important as insulation.
 

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I have been in your situation many times and understand how tough it can be to find an economical dog box to get by for awhile. Eventually, I went with a couple of boxes with top storage. I had Patriot and Creative supply boxes with top storage and the dogs stayed cool. Once, I had one without top storage, it was fine in cooler temps, but I would not put a dog in one when it was warm, humid, and/or combo that with a wet dog.
 

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Travis, have you looked at the thread, (recent) "is there anything I could have done different? "

Probably a good read before you decide.
 

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Down here in South La, we fight the heat a lot.

My present box is uninsulated, however, it has a very large storage area up top with pink panel insulation glued to the underside of the top door and carpet on the storage floor (over the holes). I also have two huge fans (10" radiator fans) that pull about 1,300 cfm each (if I remember correctly). We always park in the shade, have water and ice handy, and stake our dogs.

Positive: The storage area and fans keep the box very cool.

Negative: Large fans go through batteries, so I have to recharge often.
 
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