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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is there really away to test for what kinds of ingredients in dog food that a dogs allergic to with out a food trial.
My vet and Dermotoligst says No. You can for air air borne.
I just keep hearing people say you can have a blood test done and that will tell you what their alergic to.
I wished it was as simple as with my allergies.
I see on here every one thinks that corn, wheat, soy, fillers etc are the problems.
Which may be the cause of most problems.
But I have been told some of the protiens, such as chicken, beef etc.. could be.
I think mine is allergic to fish, after a long food trial.
Thanks, Brad
 

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Two of my dogs were tested for allergens and the lab was able to test for both environmental allergies as well as food allergies.

Here is a list of the different "categories" that they were tested for: Grasses, Weeds, Trees, Fungi, Epidermals, House Dust, Foods, Indoor, Insects, Flea, Staph, Malassezia.

There were 24 different foods that they were tested for.

The vet used Spectrum Labs.
 

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What is surprising to me is the exact number of dogs that have food allergies. I wouldn't be surprised if its how the grains, for example, are processed. Not so much the grain itself. Knew a dog that they determined was allergic to corn but yet he could eat sweet corn right off the cob.
 

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Best I can remember, it was a couple hundred dollars, and worth every penny!
 

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In the veterinary industry, tests offered by central laboratories are not regulated by either the FDA or USDA. The USDA does regulate tests for the detection of infectious disease (e.g., heartworm) but only those tests that are "products" (i.e., can be put in a box). Tests performed in laboratories are considered a "service" and therefore, not regulated. The reason this is important is that any lab can offer any test (and make any claim about that test) without having to demonstrate that the test provides meaningful (or even accurate) results. I don't know of a single veterinary dermatologist that believes that food allergies are mediated by IgE (the type of antibody that is responsible for contact or inhalant allergies). Even if IgE specific for a particular food is detected, it does not mean that those antibodies are responsible for the disease (the mechanism for food allergies is not currently known). Therefore, even if a test is accurate in detecting IgE specific for a particular food it is not necessarily predictive of which food is responsible for the allergy (and therefore, a waste of money). Again, just because a laboratory offers a test and reports results does not necessarily mean that the results are meaningful. Most good laboratories will validate the tests they offer. Ask for data demonstrating the positive predictive value of food allergy tests (% of dogs that test positive for X and responded to elimination of X from the diet) and you will likely get no response (if you do, please let me know - I would like to see the data).
Previously developed allergy tests regards,
Wayne Jensen, DVM, PhD, MBA
 

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I had a dog with allergies. When I went to the second dermatologist I still held hope that we could find something in the dog's food that was the cause.

The dermatologist held little hope that would be the cause. She said "I wish it was that simple. Most of the time it's their reaction to something in the environment."

Tried various "food trials." It wasn't the food, or at least we never proved it was.
 

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In the veterinary industry, tests offered by central laboratories are not regulated by either the FDA or USDA. The USDA does regulate tests for the detection of infectious disease (e.g., heartworm) but only those tests that are "products" (i.e., can be put in a box). Tests performed in laboratories are considered a "service" and therefore, not regulated. The reason this is important is that any lab can offer any test (and make any claim about that test) without having to demonstrate that the test provides meaningful (or even accurate) results. I don't know of a single veterinary dermatologist that believes that food allergies are mediated by IgE (the type of antibody that is responsible for contact or inhalant allergies). Even if IgE specific for a particular food is detected, it does not mean that those antibodies are responsible for the disease (the mechanism for food allergies is not currently known). Therefore, even if a test is accurate in detecting IgE specific for a particular food it is not necessarily predictive of which food is responsible for the allergy (and therefore, a waste of money). Again, just because a laboratory offers a test and reports results does not necessarily mean that the results are meaningful. Most good laboratories will validate the tests they offer. Ask for data demonstrating the positive predictive value of food allergy tests (% of dogs that test positive for X and responded to elimination of X from the diet) and you will likely get no response (if you do, please let me know - I would like to see the data).
Previously developed allergy tests regards,
Wayne Jensen, DVM, PhD, MBA
Wow, thank you that is the best answer I have ever seen to this kind of question.

Dealt with a dog with allergies for far too many years regards,
Eileen
 

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The blood tests are known not to be as accurate as intradermal skin testing for even environmental allergies. Foods are even more difficult without a diet trial of at least 8-12 wks. Thankfully, they say that food products produce less than 10% of canine "allergies" (ie- it is widely known in the veterinary community that true food allergies are actually relatively rare... but they ARE one of the easiest things to treat and possibly try a diet trial for)
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Dont mean to stirr anything, but who is they?
And why does everyone, think that grains in the food are the only cause for problems.
My dog has food and air borne allergies.
I may be wrong but I am just trying to help, after my experience and expenses.
Thanks, Brad
 
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